Date   

White-winged Dove and another Tropical Kingbird

Ron LeValley
 

The White-winged Dove is still in our yard today (10/16/2017). Yesterday (10/15/2017) we went up to the mouth of Usal Creek and found another Tropical Kingbird. I think it was a different bird then the one we had in our yard, but who knows!

 

Ron LeValley

Mendocino Coast Photographer Gallery

357 North Franklin St.

Fort Bragg CA 95437

707/964-4706

 

P.O. Box 332

Little River CA 95456

707/937-1742

www.levalleyphoto.com

 


Fort Bragg White-throated Sparrows

David Jensen
 

15 October 2017. This morning I have two White-throated Sparrows in my yard in Fort Bragg, near the edge of Pudding Creek.

This is the sixth consecutive year they (species, not individuals) have spent the winter here.

Dave Jensen


White-winged Dove

Ron LeValley
 

Yesterday, October 12 at around noon a White-winged Dove showed up on my trail camera at the bird bath. We haven’t seen it yet, but I do have a picture.

 

Cheers, Ron

 

Ron LeValley

Mendocino Coast Photographer Gallery

357 North Franklin St.

Fort Bragg CA 95437

707/964-4706

 

P.O. Box 332

Little River CA 95456

707/937-1742

www.levalleyphoto.com

 


Gualala Common Nighthawk

Richard Trissel
 

10/11/2017
Gualala

Hello,

A COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen flying over our property, which is located 1 mile above Anchor Bay, at 6:45p this evening.  We observed it for about 2 minutes.

Keep your eyes on the skies!

Good Birding,

Rich and Nancy Trissel
Gualala



Bodega Bay pelagic trip October 15 with RROS

NANCY AND EUGENE HUNN
 

Mendo birders,


The Redwood Region Ornithological Society of Sonoma County has scheduled a pelagic trip this Sunday, October 15 (7 AM departure from Port-o-Bodega aboard the New Sea Angler), out of Bodega Bay to the continental shelf via Bodega Canyon (Sonoma County) and Cordell Banks (Marin County). $150/$160 for non-members. For details contact me (Gene Hunn) at enhunn323@....


Gene Hunn

Petaluma


Lincoln's Sparrow- Virgin Creek

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

MacKerricher State Park's Virgin Creek's Enchanted Trailhead (Fort Bragg,
CA_) (Just north of the Montessori School) - near the opening closest to
the headlands, several Lincoln's Sparrows were feeding around 10 AM Ot 8,
2017, in the Wax Myrtles near the pines. I managed one or two decent shots
of one bird for the ID. I heard them before I saw them and had been
hearing them off and on for the last couple of weeks before I finally got
a photo. It is a Life Bird for me :)

Lisa Walker (Feather Forestwalker)
Fort Bragg-Cleone, CA


Tropical Kingbird

Ron LeValley
 

Saturday, October 7, 2017 6:00 p.m.

 

We have a Tropical Kingbird in our yard out on the Little River Headlands 2 miles south of the town of Mendocino. I will post a picture soon.

 

Ron

 

Ron LeValley

Mendocino Coast Photographer Gallery

357 North Franklin St.

Fort Bragg CA 95437

707/964-4706

 

P.O. Box 332

Little River CA 95456

707/937-1742

www.levalleyphoto.com

 


N So Co sighting of a booby

Diane Hichwa
 

At 11 a.m. Sat Oct 7 we were out at Del Mar Point in Sea Ranch, far north
sonoma county, and had an immature booby fly by! No photos!
Warm largely unmarked light brown bird. Brief views multiple people
thought it had subtly warm-colored feet. It flew north and then south.

It might come your way

Diane Hichwa

Email: dhichwa@earthlink.net

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)
707-483-3130 (cell)
More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!
Millie 2007


Geese

Jessica Morton
 

Just heard what I'm thinking was GWF geese overhead, 3 miles out Rd. 409 at 10 a.m. - would love someone's (more) informed corroboration. (Apologies if they were CAGO).


CORRECTION: SURF Scoter

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Apparently, and according to Rob Fowler up in Humboldt, what I had this
morning was an imm. male Surf Scoter and not a White-winged as I had hoped
it was (Ten Mile Beach, 9 AM, Fort Bragg, CA, Oct 6, 2017)

Lisa Walker-Roseman
Fort Bragg, CA


Juvenile Kite in the Little Lake Valley Mitigation lands

marisela de santa anna
 

On October 5, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. I discovered an active White Tailed Kite nest with a juvenile bird in it. It is located in an Ash tree along Outlet Creek. The juvenile was making begging sounds to the parent, who was in a large Cottonwood tree to the east of where the nest is. It stood up on the side of the nest for about 10 minutes so I could clearly see its' rusty streaks on the chest and smudging on the face. The parent did not feed it while I was near. I would love to take someone out there tomorrow to photograph it with a close up lens. It would have to be tomorrow 10/7/17. Marisela de Santa Anna


Posting on Mendobirds

marisela de santa anna
 

Thanks to Ryan for the format info! I will repost that entry with the date and my full name. 10/6/2017 Marisela de Santa Anna


White-winged Scoter, Ten Mile Beach

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

At around 9 AM or so (October 6, 2017) on Ten Mile Beach, just north of
Ward Ave., I watched as flocks of Surf Scoters flew by.... there was at
least one large flock of Aleutian Canada Geese, and in the water, what
appeared to be a White-winged Scoter.... the bird had the characteristic
pointy tail, and was otherwise a deep, solid black, with a pale eye and a
small white streak behind the eye. A faint bit of white on the secondaries
was barely visible as the bird was in the water.

Photos avail upon request as I no longer upload to the Yahoo! site

Happy Birding,

Lisa Walker-Roseman (Feather Forestwalker)
Fort Bragg-Cleone, CA


Mendobirds posting format

Ryan Keiffer
 

6 October 2017-  Hi all, I would like to remind folks posting here that it helps to post in a consistent format for compiling records and observations. PLEASE start your message with the date and time if appropriate. When we say "Yesterday I saw a _______________ and it hasn't been seen since" we have no idea what date that actually was. The following comes from the CALBIRDS yahoo group and is nice to include.


A signature is required at the end of every message and must contain your first and last names and your city.


All messages are required to have an appropriate subject in the Subject field of the message. This allows for workable searching of the archives in the future, the ability to follow a thread, and quick compiling of records.

Just a friendly reminder, sorry if it sounds harsh.
Cheers,

Ryan Keiffer
Ukiah, MEN



Ruddy Turnstone

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

A single Ruddy Turnstone continues at Fort Bragg's Glass Beach's north
side, with a flock of Black Turnstones. Photos avail upon request (I am
guessing it is the same bird as last month)

Lisa Walker
Fort Bragg, CA


Request for binocular pick-up

kmarianchild
 

Dear Birders,

I have a pair of binoculars waiting for pick-up at Out of This World. I need them by Friday for my Walking in Wonder class which takes place on Saturday. These binoculars will be the spare pair that I loan to my students. Is anyone coming from Mendocino to Ukiah, or going to and from Ukiah or Willits and Mendocino, between now and then?

Thanks!

Kate
707-463-0839 (h)
707-472-1930 (c)


Re: A First--A Butterfly Post

jackson_us
 

We have Painted Ladies in abundance right now. Thanks for the link, Rich, on their flight. I will look for the Tortoiseshells – thanks for the head’s up. Many Monarchs here right now too, the Methuselah generation that is feeding here now and will migrate south, many to Mexico.
 
Had a Pileated Woodpecker fly right across our front deck this morning – a nice way to start the day.
 
Jeanne, Anchor Bay
 

From: richhubie@... [Mendobirds]
Sent: Thursday, September 28, 2017 11:28 PM
To: Mendobirds@...
Subject: [Mendobirds] A First--A Butterfly Post
 
 

This just might be the “first” butterfly post on MendoBirds. I’m inspired by Ted Floyd’s post on the ABA Blog called, “Painted Ladies! (Or, The Phenomenon of Phenomena)”. Ted is a noted birder, editor of Birding (America Birding Association’s flagship publication) and the author of the Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds of North America. He is also an excellent nature observer. You can read his post at this link.
 
 
Ted states that the Painted Butterfly flight  is, “… a once-in-a-generation phenomenon.” That might also be true in Mendocino County. While not as large in total numbers, we actually had two flights of Painted Ladies this year. One in late April/early May and one going on now.
 
Ted ends his post with this statement, “For starters, the state birding listserv has been hijacked of late by eager butterfly discoverers. That’s cool, but Painted Lady awareness goes well beyond those of us who are already nature lovers: We’re noticing it and talking about it at bus stops, playgrounds, and schoolyards. Together we’re reveling in our shared sense of wonder at the natural world.” We don't seem to have this “wonder” in Mendocino County. Nobody is talking about Painted Ladies or invertebrates in general. Without them MendoBirds would have few birds to talk about.
 
Just this week another butterfly phenomenon, right here in Mendocino County, is happening with little fanfare. It might be a generational happening but I don't know because there are few butterfly enthusiasts in the county. California Tortoiseshells are staging a major irruption along the Northern California Coast all the way down to the Bay Area. I heard that they were coming in "off the ocean”. A butterfly coming in from the OCEAN is amazing. A little earlier in the year I read that they were flying in the thousands at 7,000 feet in the Cascades. I wasn't expecting them here at sea level. I hope you get a chance to see them.
 
The taxonomy of butterflies in the United States is still in flux. There are many opportunities for discoveries here in Mendocino County. Early and late records, subspecies soon to be full species, rare sightings, etc. A Gulf Fritillary, recently found at the Little River Airport was only the fourth record for Mendocino County. Take a look at your local butterflies.
 
Pictures of mentioned butterflies are posted in photo section.
 
Richard Hubacek
A Birder Gone Bad (phrase coined by Robert Michael Pyle, founder of the Xerces Society)
Little River, CA
 
 
 

 



Re: A First--A Butterfly Post

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

It was fun running into you the very day after I saw several
Tortoiseshells on Seaside Beach ... also saw a Mourning Cloak for the
first time in literally years!

Feather, birding, and butterflying! LOL

Fort Bragg, CA


A First--A Butterfly Post

Richard Hubacek
 

This just might be the “first” butterfly post on MendoBirds. I’m inspired by Ted Floyd’s post on the ABA Blog called, “Painted Ladies! (Or, The Phenomenon of Phenomena)”. Ted is a noted birder, editor of Birding (America Birding Association’s flagship publication) and the author of the Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds of North America. He is also an excellent nature observer. You can read his post at this link.


Ted states that the Painted Butterfly flight  is, “… a once-in-a-generation phenomenon.” That might also be true in Mendocino County. While not as large in total numbers, we actually had two flights of Painted Ladies this year. One in late April/early May and one going on now. 

Ted ends his post with this statement, “For starters, the state birding listserv has been hijacked of late by eager butterfly discoverers. That’s cool, but Painted Lady awareness goes well beyond those of us who are already nature lovers: We’re noticing it and talking about it at bus stops, playgrounds, and schoolyards. Together we’re reveling in our shared sense of wonder at the natural world.” We don't seem to have this “wonder” in Mendocino County. Nobody is talking about Painted Ladies or invertebrates in general. Without them MendoBirds would have few birds to talk about. 

Just this week another butterfly phenomenon, right here in Mendocino County, is happening with little fanfare. It might be a generational happening but I don't know because there are few butterfly enthusiasts in the county. California Tortoiseshells are staging a major irruption along the Northern California Coast all the way down to the Bay Area. I heard that they were coming in "off the ocean”. A butterfly coming in from the OCEAN is amazing. A little earlier in the year I read that they were flying in the thousands at 7,000 feet in the Cascades. I wasn't expecting them here at sea level. I hope you get a chance to see them.

The taxonomy of butterflies in the United States is still in flux. There are many opportunities for discoveries here in Mendocino County. Early and late records, subspecies soon to be full species, rare sightings, etc. A Gulf Fritillary, recently found at the Little River Airport was only the fourth record for Mendocino County. Take a look at your local butterflies.

Pictures of mentioned butterflies are posted in photo section.

Richard Hubacek
A Birder Gone Bad (phrase coined by Robert Michael Pyle, founder of the Xerces Society)
Little River, CA






Yellow-headed Blackbird at Westport-Union Landing

Roger Adamson
 

Sept 28, Thursday, about 10 am
Westport-Union Landing State Park
There was a Yellow-headed Blackbird (probable 1st winter male-see a little
white on wing coverts) just north of Howard Creek in the Westport-Union
Landing State Park. It was with a group of about 30 Brewer's Blackbirds
(and 3 Redwings) that are hanging out in the campground area immediately
north of Howard Creek. I also had a brief view of an empid flycatcher-I
thought it lacked an eye-ring, but it made no sound and I did not get a
useful view of the bill. Probably a Willow.
See list and YHBB photo at: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39441800
Roger Adamson
Fort Bragg

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