Date   

Re: Oystercatcher near Bruhel point

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Rob Fowler reports that the CBRC secretary ranked it at a 32, which seems
better for PURE American. More to come on this one, for sure

On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 18:37:34 -0800, "Lisa D. Walker, (Feather
Forestwalker)" <feather@...> wrote:
JEHL Scale analysis from Lucas Corneliussen says 22 - which puts it
smack
dab in the middle for a hybrid, much as the Monterey bird from last
year,
which he also thinks is the same bird.



On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 17:42:22 -0800, "Roger Adamson" <radamson@...>
wrote:
Looking through old records of hybrid AMOY/BLOY in California. There
is
a
bird photographed last year on the Monterey peninsula that VERY closely
resembles the Mendocino Co bird. I am betting it is the same
individual.

See photos by Brian Sullivan:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S83325750


Roger





Re: Oystercatcher near Bruhel point

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

JEHL Scale analysis from Lucas Corneliussen says 22 - which puts it smack
dab in the middle for a hybrid, much as the Monterey bird from last year,
which he also thinks is the same bird.



On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 17:42:22 -0800, "Roger Adamson" <radamson@...>
wrote:
Looking through old records of hybrid AMOY/BLOY in California. There is
a
bird photographed last year on the Monterey peninsula that VERY closely
resembles the Mendocino Co bird. I am betting it is the same individual.
See photos by Brian Sullivan:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S83325750


Roger




Re: Oystercatcher near Bruhel point

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

I was looking at the same photos as well as some from an article about the
same bird (Jan 2021, Monterey) and wondered the same thing - could this be
the same bird???

Thanks for bringing that up!

On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 17:42:22 -0800, "Roger Adamson" <radamson@...>
wrote:
Looking through old records of hybrid AMOY/BLOY in California. There is
a
bird photographed last year on the Monterey peninsula that VERY closely
resembles the Mendocino Co bird. I am betting it is the same individual.
See photos by Brian Sullivan:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S83325750


Roger




Oystercatcher near Bruhel point

Roger Adamson
 

Looking through old records of hybrid AMOY/BLOY in California. There is a
bird photographed last year on the Monterey peninsula that VERY closely
resembles the Mendocino Co bird. I am betting it is the same individual.
See photos by Brian Sullivan:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S83325750


Roger


Oystercatcher photos

Roger Adamson
 

My eBird list with photos of the Oystercatcher is here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S101555817


Roger


Re: Oystercatcher

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

My checklist with photos is here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S101549867


It is being evaluated via Jehl Scale through Lucas Corneliussen per Rob
Fowler. I have sent in photos

Bird was first spotted by Craig Swolgaard on January 26th

Lisa D Walker-Roseman
Fort Bragg-Cleone


On Thu, 27 Jan 2022 13:57:51 -0800, "Roger Adamson" <radamson@...>
wrote:
The possible American Oystercatcher is still present near Bruhel Point.
Park at the “Vista Point” parking (mile 74.09) and the bird is with
about
20 BLOY on the rocks below.
The discussion will be between frazari AMOY and hybrid AMOY x BLOY. Has
a
fully red bill, quite a bit of black on the rump, black goes low on
breast
and is not cleanly demarcated. Photos later.

RHA



Oystercatcher

Roger Adamson
 

The possible American Oystercatcher is still present near Bruhel Point. Park at the “Vista Point” parking (mile 74.09) and the bird is with about 20 BLOY on the rocks below.
The discussion will be between frazari AMOY and hybrid AMOY x BLOY. Has a fully red bill, quite a bit of black on the rump, black goes low on breast and is not cleanly demarcated. Photos later.

RHA


Kittiwake Day

Tim Bray
 

23 January 2022 - It was a Black-legged Kittiwake show on the whale-watching cruise today. We didn't even try to get an accurate count, but it was a lot, certainly more than 50 and maybe 100. They were the most abundant Gull we saw. Interesting to see a fairly wide variation in the amount of black in the wings, width of the black collar, and some birds that appeared to be intermediate between juvenile and adult plumage.

There were also lots of Rhinoceros Auklets, sometimes in rafts of 10-15 birds, and most of them already have facial plumes; Feather got a photo of one with a horn.

Only a couple of Fulmars; apparently the large numbers have moved back out to sea. The weather turned calm, no wind and plentiful sunshine for the last couple of days. The ocean was nearly flat so it was extremely pleasant.

Oh, and the whale-watching was pretty good too, we had a few pods of Grays and one got fairly close to the boat.


Whale watching trip

Tim Bray
 

Just in case anyone else is interested, a few of us are going out on a whale-watching charter Sunday morning, in hopes of seeing some birds as well.  It's only a two-hour cruise, $50 pp, boat departs at 10. If you want to join us, call All Aboard Adventures 964-1881 and tell Captain Tim that I sent ya. 

We might be able to do this again, as long as we can get six or more people signed up we can do a charter; for more money we could go farther and stay out longer. Let me know if you can do a mid-week trip on short notice whenever the ocean forecast looks promising.

There has been a lot of bird activity a mile or two out, some feeding frenzies and a lot of Murres and other birds flying around. Feather got some photos from Laguna Point showing flocks of Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres (and possible Thick-billed), Black-legged Kittiwake and possibly even Sabine's Gull. So even just getting out where the whales are could put us into some good birds.


Re: PV Bald Eagle Nest spared

Diane Hichwa
 

Article front page of todays press Democrat: neighbors triumph over pg&e


On Jan 14, 2022, at 6:45 PM, Diane Hichwa <dhichwa@...> wrote:



Good work! Thanks.

 

Diane Hichwa

 

Email: dhichwa@...

 

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)

707-483-3130 (cell)

More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!

Millie 2007

 

From: <Mendobirds@groups.io> on behalf of Jim Havlena <havlenas@...>
Date: Friday, January 14, 2022 at 5:48 PM
To: <tbray@...>, "Mendobirds@groups.io" <mendobirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] PV Bald Eagle Nest spared

 

Thank you, Tim, for keeping us informed of this sad, but now happy "tail!"
Jim Havlena


On 1/14/2022 5:28 PM, Tim Bray wrote:

I received word this afternoon that PG&E was "unable to gain access" to the nest tree and will not be taking it down until breeding season is over. The property owner reportedly refused access to the tree-cutting crew, after allowing the PG&E biologist, arborist, and Public Information Officer onto the property. Activists were also present and ready to blockade the access road, but such a confrontation was avoided when the PIO declared that PG&E would not be cutting the tree down.




Brant Goose

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Hi, Mendobirders!

A Brant Goose is hanging out on an off-shore rock with Western Gulls off
Glass Beach south - between the main beach and the Dynamite Shack. Looks to
be a "Black Brant". Photo from a distance attached.

Also, after I got home, I had two Hutton's Vireos in my yard, calling and
singing.

Happy Birding!

Lisa D Walker-Roseman
Fort Bragg-Cleone


Re: PV Bald Eagle Nest spared

Diane Hichwa
 

Good work! Thanks.

 

Diane Hichwa

 

Email: dhichwa@...

 

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)

707-483-3130 (cell)

More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!

Millie 2007

 

From: <Mendobirds@groups.io> on behalf of Jim Havlena <havlenas@...>
Date: Friday, January 14, 2022 at 5:48 PM
To: <tbray@...>, "Mendobirds@groups.io" <mendobirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] PV Bald Eagle Nest spared

 

Thank you, Tim, for keeping us informed of this sad, but now happy "tail!"
Jim Havlena


On 1/14/2022 5:28 PM, Tim Bray wrote:

I received word this afternoon that PG&E was "unable to gain access" to the nest tree and will not be taking it down until breeding season is over. The property owner reportedly refused access to the tree-cutting crew, after allowing the PG&E biologist, arborist, and Public Information Officer onto the property. Activists were also present and ready to blockade the access road, but such a confrontation was avoided when the PIO declared that PG&E would not be cutting the tree down.




Re: PV Bald Eagle Nest spared

Jim Havlena
 

Thank you, Tim, for keeping us informed of this sad, but now happy "tail!"
Jim Havlena


On 1/14/2022 5:28 PM, Tim Bray wrote:

I received word this afternoon that PG&E was "unable to gain access" to the nest tree and will not be taking it down until breeding season is over. The property owner reportedly refused access to the tree-cutting crew, after allowing the PG&E biologist, arborist, and Public Information Officer onto the property. Activists were also present and ready to blockade the access road, but such a confrontation was avoided when the PIO declared that PG&E would not be cutting the tree down.



PV Bald Eagle Nest spared

Tim Bray
 

I received word this afternoon that PG&E was "unable to gain access" to the nest tree and will not be taking it down until breeding season is over. The property owner reportedly refused access to the tree-cutting crew, after allowing the PG&E biologist, arborist, and Public Information Officer onto the property. Activists were also present and ready to blockade the access road, but such a confrontation was avoided when the PIO declared that PG&E would not be cutting the tree down.


Re: ANOTHER Update on the Eel River Bald Eagle nest

Erica Fielder
 

Thank you for all this hard sleuthing, Tim. The process has been educational. Thank you for keeping us all informed. 

Erica



On Jan 14, 2022, at 7:39 AM, Tim Bray <tbray@...> wrote:

Yesterday I spoke with Heather Beeler, Regional Eagle Permit Coordinator for the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS). She received a request from PG&E “about a week ago” for emergency approval to take down the nest tree, citing an imminent risk of fire hazard, and approved that request by e-mail. She was very forthcoming and explained the whole situation from a regional perspective. She was also quite frank about her agency's position when confronted with any proposed action intended to reduce wildfire risk: they will never oppose such actions, fearing the liability. She also is looking at things in a regional context.

Bald Eagles, as we know, have made a great recovery and are repopulating their original range in California. Their population growth is robust, which means individual nests are no longer critical to the overall recovery.

This particular pair of Eagles has two nests in their territory, as many Bald Eagle pairs do. The nest in question seems to be favored by them and they used it to fledge young for several years, but in some years they have used the "alternative" nest - most recently in 2016, according to Ms. Beeler. This is a strategy that makes them more resilient against the catastrophic loss of a nest. If one nest is lost during the nonbreeding season, the eagles can move to the other for the next breeding season. Bald Eagles are highly individualistic and their response to disturbance varies widely. This pair has been established in this territory for many years, producing several young, so it seems likely they would remain and use their alternative nest.

This afternoon I spoke with Mike Best, Avian Protection Plan manager for PG&E. (A lot of his job consists of trying to prevent situations like this.) He says they discussed alternatives to removing the tree but the only feasible alternative is shutting off the power to that line during fire season. According to their arborist, the tree's condition has deteriorated in the past year or so, increasing the risk of falling onto the nearby power lines. So, they are back to the plan to send a crew out to cut the tree down.

At this point I think we have done what we could to protect the birds. No governmental agency is willing to step in. CDFW staff have been directed by their management to stay out of it, as the USFWS approval takes the matter out of their hands. If PG&E is prevented from doing the work, there may be repercussions to  the tenant who raised this issue in the first place if the power is shut off. Simply delaying the work is likely to make things worse for the eagles; if it happens before they begin egg production, there is a better chance that they will move to their other nest.

I hope the alternate nest can be monitored so we find out how the story ends.


Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn




*******************************************
Erica Fielder
707-671-4072

See unique interpretive displays on our new website:
https://www.ericafielderstudio.com

See more interpretive panels about nature and culture on our Facebook page: 




ANOTHER Update on the Eel River Bald Eagle nest

Tim Bray
 

Yesterday I spoke with Heather Beeler, Regional Eagle Permit Coordinator for the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS). She received a request from PG&E “about a week ago” for emergency approval to take down the nest tree, citing an imminent risk of fire hazard, and approved that request by e-mail. She was very forthcoming and explained the whole situation from a regional perspective. She was also quite frank about her agency's position when confronted with any proposed action intended to reduce wildfire risk: they will never oppose such actions, fearing the liability. She also is looking at things in a regional context.

Bald Eagles, as we know, have made a great recovery and are repopulating their original range in California. Their population growth is robust, which means individual nests are no longer critical to the overall recovery.

This particular pair of Eagles has two nests in their territory, as many Bald Eagle pairs do. The nest in question seems to be favored by them and they used it to fledge young for several years, but in some years they have used the "alternative" nest - most recently in 2016, according to Ms. Beeler. This is a strategy that makes them more resilient against the catastrophic loss of a nest. If one nest is lost during the nonbreeding season, the eagles can move to the other for the next breeding season. Bald Eagles are highly individualistic and their response to disturbance varies widely. This pair has been established in this territory for many years, producing several young, so it seems likely they would remain and use their alternative nest.

This afternoon I spoke with Mike Best, Avian Protection Plan manager for PG&E. (A lot of his job consists of trying to prevent situations like this.) He says they discussed alternatives to removing the tree but the only feasible alternative is shutting off the power to that line during fire season. According to their arborist, the tree's condition has deteriorated in the past year or so, increasing the risk of falling onto the nearby power lines. So, they are back to the plan to send a crew out to cut the tree down.

At this point I think we have done what we could to protect the birds. No governmental agency is willing to step in. CDFW staff have been directed by their management to stay out of it, as the USFWS approval takes the matter out of their hands. If PG&E is prevented from doing the work, there may be repercussions to  the tenant who raised this issue in the first place if the power is shut off. Simply delaying the work is likely to make things worse for the eagles; if it happens before they begin egg production, there is a better chance that they will move to their other nest.

I hope the alternate nest can be monitored so we find out how the story ends.


Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn




Update on the Eel River Bald Eagle nest

Tim Bray
 

This morning (13 January) the PG&E crew arrived to take down the nest tree, but the Eagles were in it, so the crews turned around and left. One could say the Eagles came to their own rescue.

Garry George of National Audubon Society (Director of their Clean Energy Initiative) contacted PG&E and was told they are "looking at alternatives as a result of the input from the public." They do still have Federal approval to take the tree down before January 15. George indicated a press release might be forthcoming from PG&E.

I am preparing a longer summary of the whole situation, but wanted to get the news out to those who are following this situation.

--


Re: Bald Eagle in PV?

Tim Bray
 

Following up on this and raising an alarm:
After hearing that there are two active nests along the Eel River near Van Arsdale I contacted the resident, and it sounds as if he is in fact talking about one of those nests. The PG&E contractors have identified the tree it is in, a diseased (not yet dead) Ponderosa Pine, as a potential threat to nearby power lines. The resident has obtained an arborist's opinion that the threat can be mitigated without cutting the tree down, but PG&E is playing hardball.

Both the resident and a respected local birder have confirmed activity in the nest in the last two days.

PG&E intends to cut the tree down by January 15, which is the date California regulations establish as the start of the "critical period" during which timber harvest operations are restricted in the vicinity of nest sites. It's not clear to me that those regulations allow cutting of nest trees even outside the critical period, but it is evidently clear to PG&E and its contractor that they do.

There are not many inland Bald Eagle nests and if this one is cut down, it is not at all clear what the pair will do.

I hope someone over in the Ukiah region knows who to call to get some clarification and perhaps stop this action.


--
Cheers,
Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn

On 1/11/2022 7:46 PM, Tim Bray wrote:
Does anyone know of Bald Eagle nesting in Potter Valley? I just heard about a possible threat to a snag being used as a nest.
If you know or have any pertinent observations, please contact me directly. 

Cheers,
Tim Bray
Albion
Sined, seeled, and delivered by a used Oscillation Overthruster. 






Bald Eagle in PV?

Tim Bray
 

Does anyone know of Bald Eagle nesting in Potter Valley? I just heard about a possible threat to a snag being used as a nest.
If you know or have any pertinent observations, please contact me directly.

Cheers,
Tim Bray
Albion
Sined, seeled, and delivered by a used Oscillation Overthruster.


Snow Geese

Roger Adamson
 

I checked Newport Rangeland for the Rough-legged Hawk with no luck. However, there is a group of six Snow Geese among the cattle on the west side of the road.
Roger Adamson

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