Date   

Re: ANOTHER Update on the Eel River Bald Eagle nest

Erica Fielder
 

Thank you for all this hard sleuthing, Tim. The process has been educational. Thank you for keeping us all informed. 

Erica



On Jan 14, 2022, at 7:39 AM, Tim Bray <tbray@...> wrote:

Yesterday I spoke with Heather Beeler, Regional Eagle Permit Coordinator for the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS). She received a request from PG&E “about a week ago” for emergency approval to take down the nest tree, citing an imminent risk of fire hazard, and approved that request by e-mail. She was very forthcoming and explained the whole situation from a regional perspective. She was also quite frank about her agency's position when confronted with any proposed action intended to reduce wildfire risk: they will never oppose such actions, fearing the liability. She also is looking at things in a regional context.

Bald Eagles, as we know, have made a great recovery and are repopulating their original range in California. Their population growth is robust, which means individual nests are no longer critical to the overall recovery.

This particular pair of Eagles has two nests in their territory, as many Bald Eagle pairs do. The nest in question seems to be favored by them and they used it to fledge young for several years, but in some years they have used the "alternative" nest - most recently in 2016, according to Ms. Beeler. This is a strategy that makes them more resilient against the catastrophic loss of a nest. If one nest is lost during the nonbreeding season, the eagles can move to the other for the next breeding season. Bald Eagles are highly individualistic and their response to disturbance varies widely. This pair has been established in this territory for many years, producing several young, so it seems likely they would remain and use their alternative nest.

This afternoon I spoke with Mike Best, Avian Protection Plan manager for PG&E. (A lot of his job consists of trying to prevent situations like this.) He says they discussed alternatives to removing the tree but the only feasible alternative is shutting off the power to that line during fire season. According to their arborist, the tree's condition has deteriorated in the past year or so, increasing the risk of falling onto the nearby power lines. So, they are back to the plan to send a crew out to cut the tree down.

At this point I think we have done what we could to protect the birds. No governmental agency is willing to step in. CDFW staff have been directed by their management to stay out of it, as the USFWS approval takes the matter out of their hands. If PG&E is prevented from doing the work, there may be repercussions to  the tenant who raised this issue in the first place if the power is shut off. Simply delaying the work is likely to make things worse for the eagles; if it happens before they begin egg production, there is a better chance that they will move to their other nest.

I hope the alternate nest can be monitored so we find out how the story ends.


Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn




*******************************************
Erica Fielder
707-671-4072

See unique interpretive displays on our new website:
https://www.ericafielderstudio.com

See more interpretive panels about nature and culture on our Facebook page: 




ANOTHER Update on the Eel River Bald Eagle nest

Tim Bray
 

Yesterday I spoke with Heather Beeler, Regional Eagle Permit Coordinator for the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS). She received a request from PG&E “about a week ago” for emergency approval to take down the nest tree, citing an imminent risk of fire hazard, and approved that request by e-mail. She was very forthcoming and explained the whole situation from a regional perspective. She was also quite frank about her agency's position when confronted with any proposed action intended to reduce wildfire risk: they will never oppose such actions, fearing the liability. She also is looking at things in a regional context.

Bald Eagles, as we know, have made a great recovery and are repopulating their original range in California. Their population growth is robust, which means individual nests are no longer critical to the overall recovery.

This particular pair of Eagles has two nests in their territory, as many Bald Eagle pairs do. The nest in question seems to be favored by them and they used it to fledge young for several years, but in some years they have used the "alternative" nest - most recently in 2016, according to Ms. Beeler. This is a strategy that makes them more resilient against the catastrophic loss of a nest. If one nest is lost during the nonbreeding season, the eagles can move to the other for the next breeding season. Bald Eagles are highly individualistic and their response to disturbance varies widely. This pair has been established in this territory for many years, producing several young, so it seems likely they would remain and use their alternative nest.

This afternoon I spoke with Mike Best, Avian Protection Plan manager for PG&E. (A lot of his job consists of trying to prevent situations like this.) He says they discussed alternatives to removing the tree but the only feasible alternative is shutting off the power to that line during fire season. According to their arborist, the tree's condition has deteriorated in the past year or so, increasing the risk of falling onto the nearby power lines. So, they are back to the plan to send a crew out to cut the tree down.

At this point I think we have done what we could to protect the birds. No governmental agency is willing to step in. CDFW staff have been directed by their management to stay out of it, as the USFWS approval takes the matter out of their hands. If PG&E is prevented from doing the work, there may be repercussions to  the tenant who raised this issue in the first place if the power is shut off. Simply delaying the work is likely to make things worse for the eagles; if it happens before they begin egg production, there is a better chance that they will move to their other nest.

I hope the alternate nest can be monitored so we find out how the story ends.


Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn




Update on the Eel River Bald Eagle nest

Tim Bray
 

This morning (13 January) the PG&E crew arrived to take down the nest tree, but the Eagles were in it, so the crews turned around and left. One could say the Eagles came to their own rescue.

Garry George of National Audubon Society (Director of their Clean Energy Initiative) contacted PG&E and was told they are "looking at alternatives as a result of the input from the public." They do still have Federal approval to take the tree down before January 15. George indicated a press release might be forthcoming from PG&E.

I am preparing a longer summary of the whole situation, but wanted to get the news out to those who are following this situation.

--


Re: Bald Eagle in PV?

Tim Bray
 

Following up on this and raising an alarm:
After hearing that there are two active nests along the Eel River near Van Arsdale I contacted the resident, and it sounds as if he is in fact talking about one of those nests. The PG&E contractors have identified the tree it is in, a diseased (not yet dead) Ponderosa Pine, as a potential threat to nearby power lines. The resident has obtained an arborist's opinion that the threat can be mitigated without cutting the tree down, but PG&E is playing hardball.

Both the resident and a respected local birder have confirmed activity in the nest in the last two days.

PG&E intends to cut the tree down by January 15, which is the date California regulations establish as the start of the "critical period" during which timber harvest operations are restricted in the vicinity of nest sites. It's not clear to me that those regulations allow cutting of nest trees even outside the critical period, but it is evidently clear to PG&E and its contractor that they do.

There are not many inland Bald Eagle nests and if this one is cut down, it is not at all clear what the pair will do.

I hope someone over in the Ukiah region knows who to call to get some clarification and perhaps stop this action.


--
Cheers,
Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn

On 1/11/2022 7:46 PM, Tim Bray wrote:
Does anyone know of Bald Eagle nesting in Potter Valley? I just heard about a possible threat to a snag being used as a nest.
If you know or have any pertinent observations, please contact me directly. 

Cheers,
Tim Bray
Albion
Sined, seeled, and delivered by a used Oscillation Overthruster. 






Bald Eagle in PV?

Tim Bray
 

Does anyone know of Bald Eagle nesting in Potter Valley? I just heard about a possible threat to a snag being used as a nest.
If you know or have any pertinent observations, please contact me directly.

Cheers,
Tim Bray
Albion
Sined, seeled, and delivered by a used Oscillation Overthruster.


Snow Geese

Roger Adamson
 

I checked Newport Rangeland for the Rough-legged Hawk with no luck. However, there is a group of six Snow Geese among the cattle on the west side of the road.
Roger Adamson


Re: Rose Memorial Garden rogue squirrels

Shannon Underhill
 

Hi,

I also had the same experience as Lisa. I had multiple fist-sized pine cones drop from high up in a tall tree just five feet from where I stood. I had just exited my truck parked at the same location Lisa describes. It would have been a trip to the hospital, at the very least, if one of those hit me. Also, like Lisa described, the barrage stopped one I walked away from the area.

Shannon Underhill

Two Bears Remodeling LLC
707-357-7044

On Jan 10, 2022, at 8:23 PM, Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@...> wrote:

Hi all!

At the eastern-most Banksia tree in Rose Memorial Gardens is the location
that the Tennessee and Nashville Warblers have been seen most often. So, it
is often that I go to this section, park my car and walk out from there
after checking that tree, to the other Banksia Trees.

The last three times I have gone there, however, I have been bombarded by
pine tree parts. Not just needles; pieces of branches containing one or
more green pinecones that are absolutely huge and heavy. They don't just
fall, harmlessly to the ground, either. They've hit the fence, the railroad
tracks, bounced off tombs and grave markers, near-missing my head, or lower
legs, depending on how sharp the angle of ricochet is.

The Western Gray Squirrels are definitely letting me know that they do not
want me there, for as soon as I walk away, they stop. When I go back to get
into my car, they start up again. I would caution other birders who are
visiting the graveyard, to be aware of the two Western Gray Squirrels in
the tall pine close to the railroad tracks where the eastern-most Banksia
tree is. And park anywhere but beneath that pine. The squirrels let fly
with the tips of branches as I was getting ready to leave today, right on
top of my car. I have never harassed or otherwise bothered them. I just
don't think they want humans near that spot.

Lisa Walker-Roseman
Fort Bragg/Cleone





Rose Memorial Garden rogue squirrels

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Hi all!

At the eastern-most Banksia tree in Rose Memorial Gardens is the location
that the Tennessee and Nashville Warblers have been seen most often. So, it
is often that I go to this section, park my car and walk out from there
after checking that tree, to the other Banksia Trees.

The last three times I have gone there, however, I have been bombarded by
pine tree parts. Not just needles; pieces of branches containing one or
more green pinecones that are absolutely huge and heavy. They don't just
fall, harmlessly to the ground, either. They've hit the fence, the railroad
tracks, bounced off tombs and grave markers, near-missing my head, or lower
legs, depending on how sharp the angle of ricochet is.

The Western Gray Squirrels are definitely letting me know that they do not
want me there, for as soon as I walk away, they stop. When I go back to get
into my car, they start up again. I would caution other birders who are
visiting the graveyard, to be aware of the two Western Gray Squirrels in
the tall pine close to the railroad tracks where the eastern-most Banksia
tree is. And park anywhere but beneath that pine. The squirrels let fly
with the tips of branches as I was getting ready to leave today, right on
top of my car. I have never harassed or otherwise bothered them. I just
don't think they want humans near that spot.

Lisa Walker-Roseman
Fort Bragg/Cleone


Rock Sandpipers, YB Sapsucker & Tennessee Warbler

Richard Trissel
 

Hello,

At 10:15a this morning we observed the YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and 1 TENNESSEE WARBLER (and a NASHVILLE WARBLER) in the Banksia Trees at Rose Memorial.  Be advised that there is an Orange-crowned Warbler in the same area.

At 11:15a there were 2 ROCK SANDPIPERS at Laguna Point in MacKerricher State Park.

Good Birding,

Rich and Nancy Trissel


Rock Sandpiper, Virgin Creek

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Happy National Bird Day!

I went to Virgin Creek just to check out the rocks at high tide so I could
see what might be out there.

I saw:

Black Turnstones
Surfbirds
Sanderlings

and a single Rock Sandpiper foraging on the rocks to the north of the main
beach. it very well could be one of the three that have been at Laguna
Point in recent weeks.

Attached a photo

Lisa D Walker-Roseman, Fort Bragg-Cleone


Manchester Mystery Teal or Possible Garganey?

Ryan Keiffer
 

January 3 2022-
Yesterday morning while walking Manchester beach just south of Davis Lake area, Kyle Farmer and I were looking through bunches of Surf Scoters looking for other scoters and our attention quickly went to a small teal sized duck that was following a Surf Scoter around not too far offshore. The light wasn’t very good at the time but we managed some bad digiscope pictures. The size comparison with the Surf Scoter, facial patterns, and bill shape upon further review of the picture have us looking for answers, thinking it might be a Garganey. I thought it was odd for a supposed teal sp. to be riding the surf. If anyone wants to look for the bird, we suggest parking at the end of Kinney Road and walking north on the beach towards Davis Lake, but look at every group of scoters you see! 
--
Ryan Keiffer
Ukiah, CA MEN


Slate-colored DEJU in my yard

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

This is the third or fourth time I have seen a DEJU Slate-colored form in
my yard. This particular one has been here for several days now. This time,
however, I cannot get a photo of it. Every time I step out onto the porch
with the camera, they all fly away. If I step out onto the porch without
it, they are fine. Ah, birds... they're onto me!

If I get a photo, I will make a report on eBird

Lisa D Walker-Roseman,
Fort Bragg/Cleone


Painted Bunting continues in Willits

Mike Curry
 

Saturday, January 1, 2022

The Painted Bunting is continuing to come to my feeders in my yard today. See previous posts for info on how to chase it if you want.

Good birding!

Mike Curry
Willits, CA


Re: THREE Rock Sandpipers Laguna Pt

Robert Keiffer
 

Two were seen together in 1994 at that same location. Other than that only singles as far as my older records show. Good find! Cheers. Robert Keiffer. Hopland Mendocino County. rjkeiffer@...

On Dec 30, 2021, at 1:58 PM, Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@...> wrote:

Here is my checklist

https://ebird.org/checklist/S99713075


Lisa

On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 11:06:00 -0800, "Lisa D. Walker, (Feather
Forestwalker)" <feather@...> wrote:
This morning I decided to try to re-find the two reported Rock
Sandpipers
at Laguna Point and was surprised to find THREE. I texted a lot of local
birders to tell them. Roger Adamson came out and scoped and photographed
them. He said it was very unusual to find THREE.

I have photos too and will be uploading later to eBird

Lisa D Walker-Roseman, Fort Bragg-Cleone






Re: THREE Rock Sandpipers Laguna Pt

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Here is my checklist

https://ebird.org/checklist/S99713075


Lisa

On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 11:06:00 -0800, "Lisa D. Walker, (Feather
Forestwalker)" <feather@...> wrote:
This morning I decided to try to re-find the two reported Rock
Sandpipers
at Laguna Point and was surprised to find THREE. I texted a lot of local
birders to tell them. Roger Adamson came out and scoped and photographed
them. He said it was very unusual to find THREE.

I have photos too and will be uploading later to eBird

Lisa D Walker-Roseman, Fort Bragg-Cleone



THREE Rock Sandpipers Laguna Pt

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

This morning I decided to try to re-find the two reported Rock Sandpipers
at Laguna Point and was surprised to find THREE. I texted a lot of local
birders to tell them. Roger Adamson came out and scoped and photographed
them. He said it was very unusual to find THREE.

I have photos too and will be uploading later to eBird

Lisa D Walker-Roseman, Fort Bragg-Cleone


Re: Brown Pelicans being seen and a rescue of Nothern Fulmars at Manchester State Beach.

jackson_us
 

That is a very good thought, Diane. We know the upwelling that happens off of Point Arena ignites the entire food chain to our south, fueling the Farallones. Jeanne
 

From: Diane Hichwa
Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2021 9:47 PM
To: tbray@... ; jackson_us ; Mendobirds
Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] Brown Pelicans being seen and a rescue of Nothern Fulmars at Manchester State Beach.
 

With your comment:  I'm always amazed at how different the conditions are north and south of Point Arena---

I wonder if a major factor is the upwelling from Pt Arena South?

 

 

Diane Hichwa

 

Email: dhichwa@...

 

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)

707-483-3130 (cell)

More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!

Millie 2007

 

From: <Mendobirds@groups.io> on behalf of Tim Bray <tbray@...>
Reply-To: <tbray@...>
Date: Tuesday, December 28, 2021 at 9:09 AM
To: Jeanne & Rick Jackson <jackson2@...>, Mendobirds <Mendobirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] Brown Pelicans being seen and a rescue of Nothern Fulmars at Manchester State Beach.

 

On the north coast the departure was fairly sudden this year. There were hundreds on each of the roosting rocks from Mendocino to Westport around November 3-4, but a week later I saw flocks flying south and by the 17th nearly all had disappeared. A few individuals, mostly juveniles, could be seen now and then well into December but the thousands that summered here were gone. By the date of our Raptor Run (Nov 13) there were few left north of Elk but we did see a substantial flock at the mouth of the Garcia. I don't have all the reports yet but so far none reported for yesterday's Fort Bragg CBC (exceptionally poor conditions for seawatching).

I think this is pretty consistent with the normal pattern, it was just a lot more pronounced this year because we had such a huge population of them all summer. It would have been interesting to try surveying to get an estimate of the total number along the Mendocino coast. Certainly it was in the thousands. The total population is estimated to be somewhere in the 100,000 - 200,000 range although there are no formal surveys. So as much as ten percent of the total population might have summered here. They should have been in good condition for migration and breeding, after gorging on anchovies for almost six months. 

I'm always amazed at how different the conditions are north and south of Point Arena.

Interesting about the Fulmars. Given the unusually large numbers of them unusually close to shore in November-December, it's not surprising to find unusual numbers washing up on beaches. (About half of all young-of-year will fail to survive their first winter, and there are millions of them.)  COASST has data suggesting this recurs every 5 to 8 years. This year might be the biggest peak yet though. Is it simply a function of population cycles or is there some ecosystem variable at work? Nobody knows.
Young birds have a difficult time even in years like this when food is abundant. I watched a Fulmar eating a dead jellyfish at Caspar (just off the rocks) about a month ago, and wondered if such a meal could even provide enough energy for the bird to stay warm. Now I wonder about the Fulmar Foot Disease - is it a cause of emaciation, or a symptom?

I did get a chuckle at the "intoxicating smell" remark! Fulmars have a defense mechanism similar to Turkey Vultures... projectile vomiting, reportedly a "particularly vile-smelling" liquid.
--
Cheers,
Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn

 

 

On 12/27/2021 4:05 PM, jackson_us wrote:

12/27/21

 

Hi All,

  Do any of you keep records on when the brown pelicans have migrated south? We are still seeing dozens upon dozens of them in Gualala/Anchor Bay. Last night I looked through my spotting scope at Fish Rocks at sunset (I’m a half mile away from the shoreline). I was surprised to see brown pelicans on all the high spots, with hundreds of gulls and cormorants a little lower on the rocks. It looked like the bigger rock was totally covered in birds!

  Bob Rutemoeller wrote me that yesterday, Sunday, he saw at least 50 to 60 pelicans on the sandbar and in the Gualala River. It seems very late to me to be seeing them. What do you think?

  Also of note, there have been Northern fulmars in trouble at Manchester State Beach. A big rescue of over 20 of them took place. According to International Bird Rescue Center, they are first year birds with lesions on their feet. You can read about them at this IBRC link: https://www.birdrescue.org/puzzling-influx-of-northern-fulmars/ There is a fun photo of these birds in a swimming pool. Looks like most of them will survive thanks to some dedicate people who went the extra mile for these birds.

 

  Jeanne Jackson, Anchor Bay


Re: Brown Pelicans being seen and a rescue of Nothern Fulmars at Manchester State Beach.

Diane Hichwa
 

With your comment:  I'm always amazed at how different the conditions are north and south of Point Arena---

I wonder if a major factor is the upwelling from Pt Arena South?

 

 

Diane Hichwa

 

Email: dhichwa@...

 

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)

707-483-3130 (cell)

More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!

Millie 2007

 

From: <Mendobirds@groups.io> on behalf of Tim Bray <tbray@...>
Reply-To: <tbray@...>
Date: Tuesday, December 28, 2021 at 9:09 AM
To: Jeanne & Rick Jackson <jackson2@...>, Mendobirds <Mendobirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] Brown Pelicans being seen and a rescue of Nothern Fulmars at Manchester State Beach.

 

On the north coast the departure was fairly sudden this year. There were hundreds on each of the roosting rocks from Mendocino to Westport around November 3-4, but a week later I saw flocks flying south and by the 17th nearly all had disappeared. A few individuals, mostly juveniles, could be seen now and then well into December but the thousands that summered here were gone. By the date of our Raptor Run (Nov 13) there were few left north of Elk but we did see a substantial flock at the mouth of the Garcia. I don't have all the reports yet but so far none reported for yesterday's Fort Bragg CBC (exceptionally poor conditions for seawatching).

I think this is pretty consistent with the normal pattern, it was just a lot more pronounced this year because we had such a huge population of them all summer. It would have been interesting to try surveying to get an estimate of the total number along the Mendocino coast. Certainly it was in the thousands. The total population is estimated to be somewhere in the 100,000 - 200,000 range although there are no formal surveys. So as much as ten percent of the total population might have summered here. They should have been in good condition for migration and breeding, after gorging on anchovies for almost six months. 

I'm always amazed at how different the conditions are north and south of Point Arena.

Interesting about the Fulmars. Given the unusually large numbers of them unusually close to shore in November-December, it's not surprising to find unusual numbers washing up on beaches. (About half of all young-of-year will fail to survive their first winter, and there are millions of them.)  COASST has data suggesting this recurs every 5 to 8 years. This year might be the biggest peak yet though. Is it simply a function of population cycles or is there some ecosystem variable at work? Nobody knows.
Young birds have a difficult time even in years like this when food is abundant. I watched a Fulmar eating a dead jellyfish at Caspar (just off the rocks) about a month ago, and wondered if such a meal could even provide enough energy for the bird to stay warm. Now I wonder about the Fulmar Foot Disease - is it a cause of emaciation, or a symptom?

I did get a chuckle at the "intoxicating smell" remark! Fulmars have a defense mechanism similar to Turkey Vultures... projectile vomiting, reportedly a "particularly vile-smelling" liquid.
--
Cheers,
Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn

 

 

On 12/27/2021 4:05 PM, jackson_us wrote:

12/27/21

 

Hi All,

  Do any of you keep records on when the brown pelicans have migrated south? We are still seeing dozens upon dozens of them in Gualala/Anchor Bay. Last night I looked through my spotting scope at Fish Rocks at sunset (I’m a half mile away from the shoreline). I was surprised to see brown pelicans on all the high spots, with hundreds of gulls and cormorants a little lower on the rocks. It looked like the bigger rock was totally covered in birds!

  Bob Rutemoeller wrote me that yesterday, Sunday, he saw at least 50 to 60 pelicans on the sandbar and in the Gualala River. It seems very late to me to be seeing them. What do you think?

  Also of note, there have been Northern fulmars in trouble at Manchester State Beach. A big rescue of over 20 of them took place. According to International Bird Rescue Center, they are first year birds with lesions on their feet. You can read about them at this IBRC link: https://www.birdrescue.org/puzzling-influx-of-northern-fulmars/ There is a fun photo of these birds in a swimming pool. Looks like most of them will survive thanks to some dedicate people who went the extra mile for these birds.

 

  Jeanne Jackson, Anchor Bay


Fort Bragg CBC

Tim Bray
 

Preliminary results from the Fort Bragg CBC on 27 December:

Extremely poor weather conditions: Wind 10-15 mph at dawn increasing to 15-25 mph in the afternoon, rain in the morning, showers with occasional hail in some places. Temperature 35F at dawn, rising all the way up to 44F in the afternoon; I don't even want to know what the wind-chill factor was.

In spite of all that, around 30 people went out to count birds, demonstrating admirable commitment and a worrisome disregard for personal comfort. Birds were very difficult to find, and hard to see clearly even when you did find one. Nevertheless!

Total species 134. We might pick up a couple more from the Yard/Feeder watch. Our ten-year average is 140 and our all-time low was 132.

Best birds:
Blue-winged Teal with two Cinnamon Teal at Ocean Shores pond (photographed)
Ruddy Turnstone on the beach north of Ward Avenue, also two Snowy Plovers
(pending review) Ring-billed Gull at Glass Beach (would be a first for the Count)
Long-tailed Duck at Caspar, possibly same bird previously reported from Ten Mile River?
Black-legged Kittiwake at Todd's Point - blown in by the wind
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Palm Warbler at Rose Memorial cemetery (the Tennessee Warbler showed the day before and the day after)
Burrowing Owl off the Noyo Trail, also Clark's Grebe in Soldier's Bay
White-winged Scoters in flock of Surf Scoters flying south (seen by two parties several miles apart)

Other interesting sightings included four Bald Eagles, including one observed snatching a seabird off the water.
David Jensen found a protected spot behind the Point Cabrillo Lighthouse and was able to scope for seabirds; he counted 300 Northern Fulmars in one hour.
A single flock of around 100+ Greater White-fronted Goose was seen flying south by three different parties.

Notable misses: Killdeer, Wilson's Snipe, American Goldfinch


Painted Bunting continues in Willits

Mike Curry
 

Wednesday December 29, 2021

The Painted Bunting is continuing to come to my feeders, albeit perhaps less often, in my yard today.

Mike Curry
Willits, CA

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