Date   

Blue-winged Teal at Ten Mile River and Purple Martin report

Dan Airola
 

Yesterday (6/18) at the Highway 1 bridge, I observed a mixed flock of mallards and teal in eclipsed plumage.  Although the light was not great, one teal clearly showed the white crescent typical of a male Blue-winged teal.  It and at least two other birds had a black rump with a vertical stripe immediately in front of it.  When I moved to try to get a better view, they had left.  The specific location was a small eddy area on the north side of the river, about 200 yd upstream of the bridge.  I now realize that Roger Adamson was there taking Purple Martin pictures earlier, but I saw the teal about 45 min after I last saw him.

To those interested, I found Purple Martins at 8 sites where they have been seen in the past.  Three sites were in snags (Enchanted Forest, Milepost 66.65 near Little Valley Rd, and Caspar Cr)) and the rest in bridges (Juan Cr., Ten Mile R.,Noyo R.[only 1 bird heard singing once from within bridge hole], Big R., and Greenwood Cr.). It appears that the population here is healthy, unlike many other areas in the state. 

Dan Airola 
916/494-1283 
d.airola@...


Gualala/Anchor Bay

jackson_us
 

6/19/2021
 
Hi All,
  The Osprey nest I watch through a spotting scope here in Anchor Bay has two chicks in it. They have grown some feathers and are looking very alert and healthy. The mother is still on guard at the nest.
  The female Bald Eagle recently has been seen, after an absence of some weeks. We think/hope she was on a nest in the watershed of the Gualala River. We’ll be keeping watch to see if a fledgling is seen.
  Anna’s Hummingbirds have been seen in normal numbers recently.
  Quite a few Red-necked Phalaropes were seen last week, females in breeding plumage.
  And we are seeing lots of Brown Pelicans, including fledglings now, all streaming northward.
 
Jeanne Jackson, Anchor Bay


June 18 2021. Very late Golden-crowned Sparrow at Lake Mendocino

Dave Bengston
 

Sorry for late post. Yesterday, I saw a Golden-crowned Sparrow in the Pome Area (NW corner of lake). It was about 10:15. It was located near a picnic table SE of the SE corner of the parking lot, just above where two trails cross each other, about 60 yards down from the parking lot. It was very unafraid. It was foraging next to a man sitting at the table, and it let me get to within 5 yards without fleeing. In fact, it never did fly away. The feathers were very old and worn in non breeding plumage, but the golden crown was very apparent. I saw one other bird foraging with it about the same size and shape, but it flew before I could look at it.

Dave Bengston
Ukiah


Cooper's Hawk and other birds at MCBG

Tim Bray
 

16 June 2021 - on the regular third-Wednesday "Early Bird" walk at the Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, we tallied 63 species of birds. We had a larger-than-usual group of 14 people, and took a bit longer than usual as well, but it was still a remarkable count for a 2-mile route. Not quite our best day ever - we had 65 species on a May count several years ago.

Best bird was probably the gorgeous male Hermit Warbler foraging in the top of a pine tree directly over the North Trail next to  the Native Plant Garden. We first heard the bird singing, and after much looking we were treated to some good views (and a case of "warbler neck"). I heard two other singing birds in other areas but was unable to get a visual.

Most surprising to me though was an immature Cooper's Hawk that zipped by us near where the North Trail crosses the creek. Presumably a hatch-year bird, already dispersing from the breeding grounds, but it seems really early for that.


Re: Gilded flicker (Low Gap Pk) & yellow warbler (Bushay)

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

We don't have Gilded Flicker's this far north. They are a southwestern
species. It is likely you saw a Northern Flicker :)


On Sun, 06 Jun 2021 20:10:17 -0700, phalady@hotmail.com wrote:
Hello,
I'm new to Mendobirds and to birding in general, so a quick hello to
fellow birdwatchers in the Ukiah area. Based on Peregrine Audobon's
excellent webpage on Inland Mendo birding, I decided to check out Bushay
campground. Right past the gate, I saw a lovely yellow warbler. Earlier
in the day, spotted a gilded flicker perched near its nest on a tree
right next to the small bridge over Orr's Creek that leads to the dog
park. Looking forward to many enjoyable sightings.

-Pravin

Links:
------
[1] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8688
[2]
mailto:phalady@hotmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Gilded%20flicker%20%28Low%20Gap%20Pk%29%20%26%20yellow%20warbler%20%28Bushay%29
[3] https://groups.io/mt/83362433/974701
[4] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[6] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[7] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub


Gilded flicker (Low Gap Pk) & yellow warbler (Bushay)

Pravin
 

Hello,
I'm new to Mendobirds and to birding in general, so a quick hello to fellow birdwatchers in the Ukiah area. Based on Peregrine Audobon's excellent webpage on Inland Mendo birding, I decided to check out Bushay campground. Right past the gate, I saw a lovely yellow warbler. Earlier in the day, spotted a gilded flicker perched near its nest on a tree right next to the small bridge over Orr's Creek that leads to the dog park. Looking forward to many enjoyable sightings.

-Pravin


Re: regarding the Five fledged Peregrines

marg Duncan
 

Didn't think of Mendobirds as a place that would attract crowds of ill-mannered non-birders.  Sorry.  Glad to report that all seems well.  As of 6/3, chicks were doing aerobatics, chasing parents and screeching/begging, putting on their usual fledged airshow.     


On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 5:55 PM Erica Fielder <efielder@...> wrote:
Thank you, Lisa. 

Erica


On Jun 1, 2021, at 3:34 PM, Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@...> wrote:

Blabbing the location online is a NO-NO. The parent birds apparently
didn't return during five hours of observation from afar. DOZENS of groups
of people had to be asked to move farther away, as they were walking right
up to the fledglings and taking photos and selfies, video, etc.

Those parents are stressed enough without having humans add to their
stress. Let them be and stop broadcasting the nest site location, please.
For the sake of the birds!

Lisa D Walker-Roseman






*******************************************
Erica Fielder
707-671-4072

See unique interpretive displays on our new website:
https://www.ericafielderstudio.com

See more interpretive panels about nature and culture on our Facebook page: 




Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Robert Keiffer
 

Marisela,  I only have limited experience in the west (Eastern Oregon) and limited experience in May years ago back east (Vermont, New Hampshere, and Maine). With lots of birds calling.  That “teacha, teacha, teacha” sequence is pretty unique to Ovenbird.  I also highly respect Todd Easterla’s opinion ... he has a sharp ear and lots of experience!


On Jun 3, 2021, at 12:11 PM, marisela de santa anna <mdsa1955@...> wrote:


Well that is awesome Bob! and Philip!  I do hear that repeated teacha teacha teacha but was hearing witcha witcha witcha before and thought that a Common Yellowthroat just wasn't finishing it's song!  Where I work in the Little Lake Valley doing bird surveys, we have tons of C Yellowthroats and I am always noticing that each one can be individual in its song. I also hear the other three birds.
Marisela

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 10:23 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@...> wrote:
OK... thank you Todd and Robert.... it sure didn't sound like it to me,
but as I said, my ear is untrained for Ovenbird. What a cool find! I have
only seen one once in NJ


Lisa D Walker-Roseman

On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 09:29:53 -0700, Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
wrote:
> Sounds like Ovenbird to me. ... “teacha, teacha, teacha” typical call.
> Bob Keiffer, Hopland Mendocino County. Rjkeiffer@...
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jun 3, 2021, at 8:55 AM, Todd Easterla <teasterla@...>
wrote:
>>
>> OVENBIRD!!!!!!
>>
>> Jun 3, 2021 6:26:11 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
>> <feather@...>:
>>
>>> Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing*
like
>>> that species to me.
>>>
>>> When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via
>>> Bird
>>> Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared
it
>>> to
>>> other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other
>>> recordings
>>> I listened to suggested:
>>>
>>> Black-headed Grosbeak
>>> Dark-eyed Junco
>>> and
>>> Chipping Sparrow
>>>
>>>
>>> Lisa Walker-Roseman
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
>>>> <pgeorgakakos3@...> wrote:
>>>> Dear Mendo birders,
>>>> On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some
fish
>>>> surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
>>>> vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
>>>> seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
>>>> repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3
>>>> seconds.
>>>> Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
>>>> descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive
songster,
>>>> you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
>>>> day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across
>>>> the
>>>> river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos,
so
>>>> not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
>>>> recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
>>>> possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler?
>>>> If
>>>> you have thoughts, please send them my way.
>>>> Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
>>>> really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also,
>>>> this
>>>> reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require
a
>>>> 10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
>>>> Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
>>> time
>>>> to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
>>>> Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
>>>> graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can
>>>> be
>>>> a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However,
>>>> dogs
>>>> are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
>>>> nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
>>>> group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding
birds
>>> as
>>>> they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior
or
>>>> they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
>>>> their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
>>>> great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to
connect
>>>> about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
>>>> best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">
>>>>
>>>> Links:
>>>> ------
>>>> [1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
>>>> [2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
>>>> [3]
>>>>
>>>
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@...?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
>>>> [4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
>>>> [5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
>>>> [6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
>>>> [7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
>>>> [8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>






Franklin’s Gull

Roger Adamson
 

Chris Lamoureux reports seeing a Franklin’s Gull fly by the MC Bot Gardens today. It was in company with Cal Gulls and all headed north without stopping. Not chase-able.
Roger Adamson
For Chris Lamoureux


Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

marisela de santa anna
 

Well that is awesome Bob! and Philip!  I do hear that repeated teacha teacha teacha but was hearing witcha witcha witcha before and thought that a Common Yellowthroat just wasn't finishing it's song!  Where I work in the Little Lake Valley doing bird surveys, we have tons of C Yellowthroats and I am always noticing that each one can be individual in its song. I also hear the other three birds.
Marisela

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 10:23 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@...> wrote:
OK... thank you Todd and Robert.... it sure didn't sound like it to me,
but as I said, my ear is untrained for Ovenbird. What a cool find! I have
only seen one once in NJ


Lisa D Walker-Roseman

On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 09:29:53 -0700, Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
wrote:
> Sounds like Ovenbird to me. ... “teacha, teacha, teacha” typical call.
> Bob Keiffer, Hopland Mendocino County. Rjkeiffer@...
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jun 3, 2021, at 8:55 AM, Todd Easterla <teasterla@...>
wrote:
>>
>> OVENBIRD!!!!!!
>>
>> Jun 3, 2021 6:26:11 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
>> <feather@...>:
>>
>>> Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing*
like
>>> that species to me.
>>>
>>> When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via
>>> Bird
>>> Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared
it
>>> to
>>> other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other
>>> recordings
>>> I listened to suggested:
>>>
>>> Black-headed Grosbeak
>>> Dark-eyed Junco
>>> and
>>> Chipping Sparrow
>>>
>>>
>>> Lisa Walker-Roseman
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
>>>> <pgeorgakakos3@...> wrote:
>>>> Dear Mendo birders,
>>>> On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some
fish
>>>> surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
>>>> vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
>>>> seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
>>>> repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3
>>>> seconds.
>>>> Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
>>>> descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive
songster,
>>>> you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
>>>> day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across
>>>> the
>>>> river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos,
so
>>>> not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
>>>> recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
>>>> possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler?
>>>> If
>>>> you have thoughts, please send them my way.
>>>> Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
>>>> really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also,
>>>> this
>>>> reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require
a
>>>> 10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
>>>> Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
>>> time
>>>> to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
>>>> Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
>>>> graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can
>>>> be
>>>> a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However,
>>>> dogs
>>>> are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
>>>> nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
>>>> group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding
birds
>>> as
>>>> they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior
or
>>>> they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
>>>> their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
>>>> great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to
connect
>>>> about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
>>>> best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">
>>>>
>>>> Links:
>>>> ------
>>>> [1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
>>>> [2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
>>>> [3]
>>>>
>>>
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@...?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
>>>> [4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
>>>> [5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
>>>> [6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
>>>> [7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
>>>> [8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>






Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

OK... thank you Todd and Robert.... it sure didn't sound like it to me,
but as I said, my ear is untrained for Ovenbird. What a cool find! I have
only seen one once in NJ


Lisa D Walker-Roseman

On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 09:29:53 -0700, Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@att.net>
wrote:
Sounds like Ovenbird to me. ... “teacha, teacha, teacha” typical call.
Bob Keiffer, Hopland Mendocino County. Rjkeiffer@att.net

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 3, 2021, at 8:55 AM, Todd Easterla <teasterla@comcast.net>
wrote:

OVENBIRD!!!!!!

Jun 3, 2021 6:26:11 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
<feather@mcn.org>:

Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing*
like
that species to me.

When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via
Bird
Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared
it
to
other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other
recordings
I listened to suggested:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
and
Chipping Sparrow


Lisa Walker-Roseman


On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some
fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3
seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive
songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across
the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos,
so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler?
If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also,
this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require
a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can
be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However,
dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding
birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior
or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to
connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub





Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Robert Keiffer
 

Sounds like Ovenbird to me. ... “teacha, teacha, teacha” typical call. Bob Keiffer, Hopland Mendocino County. Rjkeiffer@att.net

On Jun 3, 2021, at 8:55 AM, Todd Easterla <teasterla@comcast.net> wrote:

OVENBIRD!!!!!!

Jun 3, 2021 6:26:11 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@mcn.org>:

Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing* like
that species to me.

When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via Bird
Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared it to
other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other recordings
I listened to suggested:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
and
Chipping Sparrow


Lisa Walker-Roseman


On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub





Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Well, to my rather untrained ear (for Ovenbird), it sure doesn't seem to
go up in volume with each call.... and it sounds more like a Chipping
Sparrow to me. :)


On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 15:55:02 +0000 (UTC), "Todd Easterla"
<teasterla@comcast.net> wrote:
OVENBIRD!!!!!!

Jun 3, 2021 6:26:11 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
<feather@mcn.org>:

Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing* like
that species to me.

When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via
Bird
Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared it
to
other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other
recordings
I listened to suggested:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
and
Chipping Sparrow


Lisa Walker-Roseman


On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3
seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive
songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across
the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler?
If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also,
this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require
a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can
be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However,
dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub



Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Todd Easterla
 

OVENBIRD!!!!!!

Jun 3, 2021 6:26:11 AM Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@mcn.org>:

Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing* like
that species to me.

When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via Bird
Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared it to
other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other recordings
I listened to suggested:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
and
Chipping Sparrow


Lisa Walker-Roseman


On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub


Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

Someone else suggested Common Yellowthroat and it sounds *nothing* like
that species to me.

When I listened to your nicely recorded audio file, I had it play via Bird
Net. Bird Net ID'd the recording with three species -- so I compared it to
other recordings and what I heard and what BirdNet and the other recordings
I listened to suggested:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
and
Chipping Sparrow


Lisa Walker-Roseman


On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub


Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

marisela de santa anna
 

Hello Philip, I think that bird is a Common Yellowthroat warbler. They can vary in their songs somewhat but if you have the Sibley app and listen to the song from Utah it sounds like that! Marisela de Santa Anna

On Wed, Jun 2, 2021 at 4:29 PM Philip Georgakakos <pgeorgakakos3@...> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,

On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10 seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds. Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster, you can find the recording on my ebird list for the day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816. The bird flew across the river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this recording with a few friends who independently suggested the possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If you have thoughts, please send them my way.

Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a 10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.

Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have time to get out over the next few weeks. I've been working at and around UC Berkeley's Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week I've encountered nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds as they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or they are watching you, you're probably too close and adding stress to their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be great. If you'd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.

best wishes, 
Phil Georgakakos
Oakland & UC Berkeley Angelo Coast Range Reserve


Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Diane Hichwa
 

The ovenbirds I remember from MI days get loud, louder, LOUDER
Diane Hichwa

Email: dhichwa@earthlink.net

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)
707-483-3130 (cell)
More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!
Millie 2007




On 6/2/21, 5:30 PM, "Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)"
<Mendobirds@groups.io on behalf of feather@mcn.org> wrote:

I hear:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
Chipping Sparrow




On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%2
0Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub




Re: Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker)
 

I hear:

Black-headed Grosbeak
Dark-eyed Junco
Chipping Sparrow




On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 16:29:29 -0700, "Philip Georgakakos"
<pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Mendo birders,
On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish
surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick
vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10
seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was
repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds.
Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written
descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster,
you can find the recording on my ebird list for the
day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816 [1]. The bird flew across the
river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so
not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this
recording with a few friends who independently suggested the
possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If
you have thoughts, please send them my way.
Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was
really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this
reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a
10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.
Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have
time
to get out over the next few weeks. Ive been working at and around UC
Berkeleys Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a
graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be
a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs
are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week Ive encountered
nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a
group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds
as
they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or
they are watching you, youre probably too close and adding stress to
their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be
great. If youd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect
about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.
best wishes, Phil GeorgakakosOakland clear:both">

Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816
[2] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/message/8675
[3]
mailto:pgeorgakakos3@gmail.com?subject=Private:%20Re:%20%5BMendobirds%5D%20Potential%20Ovenbird%205%2F30%2F2021%2C%20South%20Fork%20Eel
[4] https://groups.io/mt/83272155/974701
[5] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/post
[6] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/editsub/974701
[7] mailto:Mendobirds+owner@groups.io
[8] https://groups.io/g/Mendobirds/unsub


Potential Ovenbird 5/30/2021, South Fork Eel

Philip Georgakakos
 

Dear Mendo birders,

On 5-30-2021 I heard an unfamiliar song while out conducting some fish surveys on the upper South Fork Eel River. The song came from thick vegetation along the riparian corridor and repeated about every 10 seconds for the roughly ten minutes I tried to locate it. Song was repeated syllables with a warbler tone that lasted for around 3 seconds. Phonetically, I heard "zeetle zeetle zeetle zeetle....", but written descriptions are only so useful. I also recorded this elusive songster, you can find the recording on my ebird list for the day: https://ebird.org/checklist/S89463816. The bird flew across the river at one point, but I was in a wetsuit and mask, without binos, so not great conditions to get a good enough look for ID. I shared this recording with a few friends who independently suggested the possibility of Ovenbird. Maybe a partial song of a Nashville Warbler? If you have thoughts, please send them my way.

Unfortunately, this would be a very challenging bird to chase. It was really active, moving through the dense veg at a steady pace. Also, this reach of river is very difficult to access. It would probably require a 10+ mile hike, much along the river corridor.

Even though this bird is difficult to chase, I hope many of you have time to get out over the next few weeks. I've been working at and around UC Berkeley's Angelo Coast Range Reserve, off Wilderness Lodge Rd, as a graduate student and now Postdoctoral researcher since 2013. This can be a fun spot to bird, and is open to public walk-in day use. However, dogs are not allowed on the reserve. Over the last week I've encountered nesting American Dippers and a female Common Merganser shepherding a group of fresh ducklings. Please be respectful of these breeding birds as they try to raise young. If you notice any change in their behavior or they are watching you, you're probably too close and adding stress to their already stressful tasks. Other sections of the Eel can also be great. If you'd like details on visiting the reserve or want to connect about good river spots to check out feel free to shoot me an email.

best wishes, 
Phil Georgakakos
Oakland & UC Berkeley Angelo Coast Range Reserve


Re: regarding the Five fledged Peregrines

Erica Fielder
 

Thank you, Lisa. 

Erica


On Jun 1, 2021, at 3:34 PM, Lisa D. Walker, (Feather Forestwalker) <feather@...> wrote:

Blabbing the location online is a NO-NO. The parent birds apparently
didn't return during five hours of observation from afar. DOZENS of groups
of people had to be asked to move farther away, as they were walking right
up to the fledglings and taking photos and selfies, video, etc.

Those parents are stressed enough without having humans add to their
stress. Let them be and stop broadcasting the nest site location, please.
For the sake of the birds!

Lisa D Walker-Roseman






*******************************************
Erica Fielder
707-671-4072

See unique interpretive displays on our new website:
https://www.ericafielderstudio.com

See more interpretive panels about nature and culture on our Facebook page: 



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