Date   

Free Pt. Reyes Birding Trip-Act Quick

Charlene McAllister
 

Louise Mariana 707-937-4837 is unable to use a birding weekend trip to Pt.
Reyes FOR THIS WEEKEND

It is a guided trip with David Wimpheimer and includes housing at the
Lifeboat Station. Louise cannot get a refund and is willing to give this
trip to the first person who calls her.

You would arrive tomorrow night and bird all day Saturday and Sunday around
Pt. Reyes with David.



She has to let them know right away who will be replacing her.


Greater Roadrunner

Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

2 October 2012 - sorry for the late post but just found out. A non-birder well-described to Lue Owens (long-time Covelo birder) a Greater Roadrunner seen at about mile 17 of the Covelo Road last Saturday 29 Sept., east of Dos Rios and Stewart's Point ... a few sharp curves in the road ... then a left hand turn to start uphill. The bird was on the right shoulder (southside) then ran off downhill. These birds seem to be notorious for not being refound .... Good luck! Good birding. Bob Keiffer

[Toolkit_Email_Sig_WIN]
Robert J. Keiffer - Superintendent
UC ANR, Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Rd.
Hopland, CA 95449
707-744-1424 ext. 112
Office hours: Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00

Please check out our Website: http://ucanr.org/sites/hopland/
Also, take a look at our blog (updated daily): http://ucanr.org/blogs/Hopland/index.cfm


possible Crested Caracara

Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

2 October 2012 - Toby (Dorothy Tobkin) just reported to me that she got a long look at a possible Crested Caracara flying north off Virgin Creek Beach this morning. It was a long-ways off, one-mile-plus, west of Ten-mile Beach, but she was able to view if for some time as it angled away from her. She saw a huge amount of white on the tail, flying direct, rest of bird all dark. It was an extremely large bird, (had a Western Gull nearby for size reference) but she felt certain it was not a Bald Eagle. She asked me to post it for a "heads-up" to Northern Mendocino and Humboldt birders to keep an eye out. Good birding. Posted for Dorothy Tobkin by Bob Keiffer

[Toolkit_Email_Sig_WIN]
Robert J. Keiffer - Superintendent
UC ANR, Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Rd.
Hopland, CA 95449
707-744-1424 ext. 112
Office hours: Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00

Please check out our Website: http://ucanr.org/sites/hopland/
Also, take a look at our blog (updated daily): http://ucanr.org/blogs/Hopland/index.cfm


Re: cedar waxwings

Sandberg, Stephen <sand2029@...>
 

cedar waxwings behind fbms.

On Mon, Oct 1, 2012 at 8:45 AM, crlfurey <cfurey_01@hotmail.com> wrote:

**


Have been advised that the yellow chested birds here may have been cedar
waxwings. Will try to get a closer look if they come to get the berries
they left on the east side of the mountain ash tree. Thanks for the input
and I will try to get to a guided walk at Lake Cleone or MCBG where I
understand cedar waxwings are sighted frequently.



Results of ACWO-WESJ query

kmarianchild
 

Thanks to everyone who answered! I thought some of you would be interested in what I found out. Overall, acorns rule! Stacey reports them being subordinate to a group of Eurasian collared doves, however.

Kate-

Strangely enough, I can't contribute too much to this question. I know that scrub-jays in numbers can certainly overwhelm an acorn woodpecker group, but whether an acorn woodpecker is dominant over a scrub-jay in a fair contest I don't know. I wouldn't be surprised if it depended on the status of the acorn woodpecker (sex, age, etc.) as well as, perhaps, his/her group. As I like to say, someone should study those birds one of these days!

Cheers,
Walt Koenig


Kate, Probably true overall ...but it may be just a local inter-species relationship because of the support of a strong "ACWO clan" to back up
the individual. But, I don't know for certain. I can tell you for a fact that ACWO is not dominant of Sharp-shinned Hawks! ...watched a SSHA
Kill and eat a ACWO.

Bob Keiffer


We observe the same behavior here on the coast, even in areas where ACWO are not resident year-round. On our property in Albion, ACWO only appear in summer breeding season; but when they show up at a feeder, everyone else (including Scrub-Jays and Steller's Jays) backs off and waits for them to leave. We don't have a colony of ACWO, just one breeding pair, so it's not a gang thing. I suppose they have extremely advanced pecking skills!

Cheers,
Tim Bray
Middle Ridge, Albion


Kate,

We have a house north of Redding on a few acres of Grey Pine and Blue/Live Oak woodland.

I maintain several suet feeders just outside a large picture window in my bedroom. I have been on medical leave for the past 3 weeks and was able to watch the feeders all day. We have a family of 4 ACWO and a family 4 WESJ. Both sets of parents reared 2 kids this year. The WESJ are super attracted to the suet feeders but can only gain access when the ACWO are away. Often there is a single ACWO posted at the feeders to keep them away. I have never seen physical contact at the feeders, only some stooping and dive-bombing by the ACWO. Occasionally they will display (mantle and call) at the feeders if there are WESJ in the area. I have observed that the ACWO are completely in charge of the feeders and have never seen the roles reversed.

Let me know if you have any specific questions.

Cheers,

Bud


Hi Kate,
Definitely true at our bird feeder. Acorns rule, followed by Stellerís and then Scrub-Jays.
Jeanne, Anchor Bay


Hi, I have noticed that no one at my feeding station messes with the Eurasion doves. The Acorns rarely stop at the suet feeder, which is close by, when the doves are about. The jays also leave. It is amazing how many doves can crowd onto a small sunny feeder at once. I sometimes wish someone would pitch a fit! The scrubs, stellars, and acorns all seem to share the feeders without much ado.

Good luck with your project, Stacey



I have both species of jays at my feeder and the ACWO family does dominate them. When the woodpeckers fly in everyone else scatters. The ACWO population seems to vary between 3 - 6 individuals and 2 will often tag-team to keep the jays away.

Carolyn Kinet
Inglenook, north of Fort Bragg


Hi Kate, not sure about this question. However I'm responding because I've noticed an interesting thing this year. There are 2 scrub jays that visit my backyard willow trees, that I think may be juveniles, who have learned to forage for insects in the manner of a woodpecker. In my mind, I'm imagining that they may have learned this behavior from the local Acorn Woodpeckers or Nuttal's Woodpeckers.

Perhaps this behavior is well known, but it is new to me and seems interesting.

Best,

George Gibbs
Ukiah


At the Santa Rosa Junior College campus acorn woodpeckers were quite dominantÖ..but not to European starlings!
Diane Hichwa



Kate,
In my neighborhood (suburbanized oak woodland) I have both WESJs and
ACWOs, but I never see them interact. There are about 6 woodpeckers in this
clan, and they never come to my platform feeders or hanging feeders like I
have seen elsewhere - like that evening at Menasian's. Both the jays and
woodpeckers carry and stow acorns in this neighborhood.

George Chaniot


Kelsey Creek outlet

jerry white
 

In Clear Lake State Park at the outlet earlier today there were 5 Pectoral Sandpipers, 18 Long-billed Dowitchers, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and single COMMON TERN. Jerry White


Red-breasted Nuthatches

George Chaniot
 

Mon, 01 Oct 2012 -- I just saw a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH at my feeders in
Potter Valley for the only time in 33 years. In the last week I have seen
them in about 6 locations where I normally do not expect them. Dare I say
there is an irruption in progress?

George Chaniot
Potter Valley, MEN, CA


cedar waxwings

crlfurey <cfurey_01@...>
 

Have been advised that the yellow chested birds here may have been cedar waxwings. Will try to get a closer look if they come to get the berries they left on the east side of the mountain ash tree. Thanks for the input and I will try to get to a guided walk at Lake Cleone or MCBG where I understand cedar waxwings are sighted frequently.


mountain ash trees have berries now

Carol Furey <cfurey_01@...>
 

Found locally as backyard trees, the fall-ripening red berries of the mountain ash (also called rowan) attract birds. Spotted a small group of yellow chested flycatchers with fluffy crown, no eye ring, busily harvesting the berries, then quickly moving on. The black phoebes are taking over for the departed swallows here just east of Fort Bragg. Also noted a few chickadees and sparrows beggining to arrive. On Mon. 24 Sept. saw 8-10 turkey vultures circling high over Cypress St. and Hwy 1 in FB, late afternoon.
Jetstream info, anyone? Found this last winter doing research on that low-level jetstream that was whistling through. Maps updated every 6 hours.
http://squall.sfsu.edu/crws/jetstream.html


Fw: Only 1 - 2 Spaces Available for 7 October Pelagic

Karen Havlena <jkhavlena@...>
 

We only have 1 or 2 spaces left for the MCAS pelagic trip on Sunday, 7 October.

Our three leaders are now in place:  Ron LeValley, Tony Kurz and Jon Dunn!
This should be a great team, and we are lucky to have each one of them!

If you wish to join us, please send me an email and I will respond to you.

Cost:  $105 (check)  or  $110 (credit/debit)

Time:  7-am (meeting).  Return to port 3:30-4:00-pm.

Vessel:  Telstar, Captain Randy Thornton

Sorry, no handicapped folks or children under age 11.  Thanks.

Karen Havlena

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Broad-winged Hawks

AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
 

I've been following the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory HawkWatch blog (http://www.ggro.org/events/hawkwatchToday.aspx) and today they reported seeing 295 Broad-Winged Hawks. No, that's not a typo, two hundred ninety-five! I'm heading down there tomorrow in hopes there might be one or two stragglers catching up.

I'd like to know what the story is on these birds. Have they ever been documented in Mendocino County? If not, how are they getting from Alberta to the Marin headlands without going through us?

Cheers,
Tim Bray
Middle Ridge, Albion


Re: WESJ and ACWO question

Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

Kate, Probably true overall ...but it may be just a local inter-species relationship because of the support of a strong "ACWP clan" to back up
the individual. But, I don't know for certain. I can tell you for a fact that ACWO is not dominant of Sharp-shinned Hawks! ...watched a SSHA
Kill and eat a ACWO.

From: Mendobirds@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Mendobirds@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kate Marianchild
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2012 12:10 PM
To: Mendobirds; Walter D Koenig
Subject: [Mendobirds] WESJ and ACWO question



Hi All.

I'm still working on my scrub-jay chapter, and want to check something out. At my open-platform bird feeder, acorn woodpeckers are dominant over all scrub-jays, both adults and juveniles. All a woodpecker has to do is swoop by and the scrub-jays skedaddle.

Has anyone else noticed this? I wonder if it is always true or only true when there is a strong acorn woodpecker community in the neighborhood. The woodpeckers are dominant over everybody, including the much larger Eurasian collared dove that has been hanging around lately. A single ACWO will sometimes chase the dove for a hundred feet or so.

Thanks.

Kate

Kate Marianchild
Nature Writer
katem@mcn.org<mailto:katem%40mcn.org> 707-463-0839

Currently writing Secrets of the Oak
Woodlands, a book about the interrelationships,
survival strategies, and social structures
of the animals and plants of California's
oak woodlands. Secrets of the Oak Woodlands
will be published by Heyday in 2014.


WESJ and ACWO question

kmarianchild
 

Hi All.

I'm still working on my scrub-jay chapter, and want to check something out. At my open-platform bird feeder, acorn woodpeckers are dominant over all scrub-jays, both adults and juveniles. All a woodpecker has to do is swoop by and the scrub-jays skedaddle.

Has anyone else noticed this? I wonder if it is always true or only true when there is a strong acorn woodpecker community in the neighborhood. The woodpeckers are dominant over everybody, including the much larger Eurasian collared dove that has been hanging around lately. A single ACWO will sometimes chase the dove for a hundred feet or so.

Thanks.

Kate


Kate Marianchild
Nature Writer
katem@mcn.org 707-463-0839

Currently writing Secrets of the Oak
Woodlands, a book about the interrelationships,
survival strategies, and social structures
of the animals and plants of California's
oak woodlands. Secrets of the Oak Woodlands
will be published by Heyday in 2014.


additional Coastal notes

jerry white
 

Monday September 24th and Tuesday 25th

On Monday morning at Usal among the large number of migrating swifts flying over (mostly Vaux's) were White-throated Swifts. At Russian Gulch in the early afternoon there was a BLACKPOLL WARBLER.

On Tuesday at Cottoneva Creek there was a singing (very thrasher like sound) American Dipper and 3 River Otters. Looking down on Hardy Creek from Highway 1 a Northern Pygmy-Owl was being mobbed.
At Juan Creek I refound the MAGNOLIA WARBLER.
At De Haven Creek there was another American Dipper. At the Westport Headlands a flock of about 85 Greater White-fronted Geese flew over. There were Red Crossbills at the Caspar Cemetery. Jerry White


Franklin's Gull, probable Red-throated Pipit, Bewick's Wren

Ron LeValley
 

Hello all,



Today, 9/25, I spent the morning at Ten Mile Beach trying to get some video
clips of Snowy Plovers. I did see 41 of them, but they weren't doing much
until the fog came in. Then they started feeding!



Other birds of interest included a first year Franklin's Gull that flew
south with a small flock of California Gulls, a small flock of about 6
American Pipits (my first of the year) and a single, probable, Red-throated
Pipit. This last bird was by itself just south of where Fen Creek crosses
the old haul road. I heard it well, but my views were fleeting. It gave the
single sharp "Peeent" call that I associate with the Red-throated and in one
view of it flying by it appeared to have a pinkish red head. I'll say I was
85% sure of the identification.



And day before yesterday 9/23 I had a single Bewick's Wren in our yard on
the Little River Headlands. That was the first for your yard. I don't see
many of them on the coast here.



Ron LeValley


Coastal Birds, 24 Sep

George Chaniot
 

Mon, 24 Sep 2012 -- Monday Chuck Vaughn, Karen Havlena, and I birded the
Mendocino coast, joined by Jerry White for much of the day. Besides the
immature BLACK-THROATED SPARROW on the road to Usal, the subject of previous
post, Chuck found a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER at Cottoneva Creek, and Karen
found a MAGNOLIA WARBLER at Juan Creek in the willows down the road that
leads to the East. At Laguna Point there were SOOTY SHEARWATERS very close
to shore just beyond the breaker zone, and Jerry found a male YELLOW-HEADED
BLACKBIRD in the parking lot at Lake Cleone.

George Chaniot
Potter Valley, MEN, CA


Clay-colored Sparrow - Laguna Point McKerricher SP

natureali
 

Hi Birders

Just photographed a winter adult Clay-colored Sparrow off the inland section of boardwalk half way to the point. Light lore, nice cheek patch, and faint spot on a clean breast.

Good birding,

Ali Sheehey
Weldon, CA
760-417-0268


Re: PHILADELPHIA VIREO at Russian Gulch St. Park

Henrietta Bensussen
 

Does this vindicate the sighting of a western warbling vireo I made on Dec 7 2011 in Ft. Bragg? On the 5th I had a song sparrow, Hutton's Vireo, Wilson's Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, White Crowns, Yellow Rumps, Juncos, & CB Chickadees, among others. Henri Bensussen

----- Original Message -----
From: "carolynkinet" <ckinet@gmail.com>
To: <Mendobirds@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 1:32 PM
Subject: [Mendobirds] PHILADELPHIA VIREO at Russian Gulch St. Park


Monday, Sept. 24, 2012: Toby Tobkin called to report sighting a PHILADELPHIA VIREO at Russian Gulch State Park. She saw it around 10:15 a.m. with a flock of Chestnut-backed Chickadees and other small birds in the tall trees surrounding the group campground. She didn't see it on a couple of subsequent visits to the area.

The turnoff for Russian Gulch St. Park is on Highway 1 a couple of miles north of Mendocino Village.

For Toby Tobkin,

Carolyn Kinet
Inglenook





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peak time!

Robert Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

24 Sept 2012 - For all of you veteran birders this is old news .... But for new-comers to the activity I would just like to point out that usually the last week of September and the first week of October are peak times for southward birds migration ... many times with vagrants that show up. Typically if there is a wind from the north the birds continue to fly as it is energy efficient to do so. But if the wind is from the south many times this forces the migrants to drop to the ground to "wait-it-out" until the wind shifts. Good birding! Bob Keiffer rjkeiffer@ucanr.edu<mailto:rjkeiffer@ucanr.edu>

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Robert J. Keiffer - Superintendent
UC ANR, Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Rd.
Hopland, CA 95449
707-744-1424 ext. 112
Office hours: Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00

Please check out our Website: http://ucanr.org/sites/hopland/
Also, take a look at our blog (updated daily): http://ucanr.org/blogs/Hopland/index.cfm


PHILADELPHIA VIREO at Russian Gulch St. Park

carolynkinet
 

Monday, Sept. 24, 2012: Toby Tobkin called to report sighting a PHILADELPHIA VIREO at Russian Gulch State Park. She saw it around 10:15 a.m. with a flock of Chestnut-backed Chickadees and other small birds in the tall trees surrounding the group campground. She didn't see it on a couple of subsequent visits to the area.

The turnoff for Russian Gulch St. Park is on Highway 1 a couple of miles north of Mendocino Village.

For Toby Tobkin,

Carolyn Kinet
Inglenook

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