Date   

Birds of Uganda Friday night, 7 p.m., Ukiah Civic Center.

kmarianchild
 

Birds of Uganda Benefit tomorrow night, 7 p.m., Ukiah Civic Center. The
newspaper coverage left a little to be desired, as the article was a
bit buried in the newspaper, so we'd appreciate anything you can do to
spread the word. Please pass the article along by email to anyone you
might have forgotten. (Directions are at end of article).
Thanks! Kate

“Birds of Uganda” Slideshow Flies Again!
Benefit for Peregrine Audubon Society

by Kate Marianchild

On a rainy evening in January 130 people explored the Albertine Rift,
hiked the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, and boated down the Nile River
with Matthew Matthiessen, creator of the slideshow “Birds of Uganda.”
We saw dozens, or was it hundreds, of birds of truly unbelievable
colors and shapes. Elephants, lions, giraffes, hippos, warthogs,
waterbuck, and monkeys flashed across the screen as Matthiessen awed us
with over 250 sharp, high-quality photographs. His snappy commentary,
which was always informative and often funny, was delivered entirely
without benefit of notes and included the African names of an entire
family of Mountain Gorillas. After the performance audience members
were overheard telling Matthiessen he should deliver this show all
across the country…it’s that good.

If you missed “Birds of Uganda,” or if you wish to see it again, you’re
in luck. Matthiessen is generously repeating his performance on Friday,
March 31, 7 p.m. at the Ukiah Civic Center as a benefit for Peregrine
Audubon Society. Come early as the presentation is likely to sell out.
Matthiessen's "Birds of Borneo" benefit last year played to a standing
room only crowd. The suggested donation is $7, with children under 12
admitted free of charge. No one will be turned away if they are unable
to meet this donation. (Directions below).

Matthiessen spent most of his time in the Albertine Rift looking for
birds rarely seen by humans, such as the Green-breasted Pitta and the
Grauer’s Broadbill. He searched the Nile River for the African
Shoebill, an elusive stork with a huge bill shaped like a shoe. While
seeking his "top five" he found and photographed numerous exotic birds,
including many species of Sunbirds, Bee-Eaters, Weavers, and
Cisticolas. Come find out if he found his top five on Friday, March 31!
And in the process support the educational and conservation work of
Peregrine Audubon Society.

The Ukiah Civic Center is at 300 Seminary Avenue. From 101 take Perkins
Street west to State Street (second light). Go left on State Street.
Seminary Avenue will be the fourth street on the right. Take it to the
end.


Long-tailed Duck & Say's Phoebe - Ten Mile R & Seaside Beach

Karen Havlena <jkhavlena@...>
 

Hi-- This morning, Jim saw a Say's Phoebe near Seaside Creek,
among the driftwood near Hwy 1. A short while later, he spotted
a (the?) male Long-tailed Duck quite close to the Ten Mile River-
mouth. It flew back up the river a way toward the bridge. He was
still in distinct, basic plumage. Jim said he got very good looks at
the duck, when he was at the rivermouth.

Also, both Mr & Mrs Osprey are reunited. The second bird arrived
March 16th, three days after the first bird. They frequently fly in
circles together.

Karen (for Jim) Havlena
North of Fort Bragg



---------------------------------
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Lake County

Floyd Hayes
 

I saw a 1st-cycle GLAUCOUS GULL at Clearlake Park on
Wednesday the 22nd and a male TUFTED DUCK (sleeping so
tuft not seen) among perhaps 3500 SCAUP at Borax Lake
on Saturday the 25th.

Floyd Hayes
Hidden Valley Lake, Lake County


Band-tailed Pigeons

Robert J. Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

Tuesday - 28 March 2006 - This is not really a report of a specific
sighting. I would just like to point out that I have received several
calls from the Ukiah and Hopland area, within the last couple of weeks, of
Band-tailed Pigeon flocks being seen at valley floor locations where folks
usually don't see them. I have reports of 100+ birds coming to feeders in
the Oak Knoll area of Ukiah. Other folks have reported them coming to
backyard feeders in Ukiah. I recently saw two flocks in the Oak Manor area
...one flock feeding on a backyard tree that has Boston Ivy (berries) all
over it. I have seen them in California Valley Oaks, probably feeding on
buds, on the valley floor of Hopland. Within the last couple of days I
have had them coming to my backyard chicken-yard at Hopland. Anyway, for
some reason inland Mendocino County has been inundated by these birds, and
I don't know if it is related to weather, food, or what!

Good birding. Bob Keiffer

Robert J. Keiffer
Principal Supt. of Agriculture
UC Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Road
Hopland, CA 95449
(707) 744-1424 FAX (707) 744-1040
HREC website: http://danrrec.ucdavis.edu/hopland/home_page.html

"It is not the critic who counts... not the one who points out how the
strong person stumbles... or where the doer of deeds could have done
better. The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena."
Theodore Roosevelt


Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Matthew Matthiessen <matthima@...>
 

Tues Mar 28 - The male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker was still present this morning at the same location it was reported from this past weekend. To reach this spot drive north on Tomki Rd and turn right on Fisher Lake Dr. Check the group of three trees in the front yard of the first house on the right.

Matthew Matthiessen
Ukiah, MEN, CA


Mendocino Audubon April Program

Charlene McAllister
 

MENDOCINO AUDUBON PRESENTS "JAPAN IN WINTER: BIRDING IN THE LAND OF THE
RISING SUN"



In 2003, Rich Kuehn and Dean Schuler, after 4 months of language instruction
spent four weeks in Japan. Made up of four main islands - Honshu, Hokkaido,
Kyushu and Shikoku along with several thousand smaller ones, Japan stretches
1,900 miles. On Monday, April 17th, they will be presenting pictures and
videos of the people, the places and the wildlife they discovered on their
journey. As if the many species of Cranes, the Ural Owl and Snow Monkeys
won't be enough to entertain you, you can dine on Japanese food just prior
to the presentation. This program will be given at the Gualala Arts Center
at 7:00 p.m. The catered, pre-program dinner will begin at 6 p.m. and
reservations are required. The cost of the dinner and drinks is $25.00.
Attendance at the program only is $5.00 and may be paid at the door. For
further information and reservations, call Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
at 964-6362 or email wwade@mcn.org.



Deadline for reservations is April 3rd so call or write soon so you won't
miss this exciting program.



Charlene McAllister
P.O. Box 332
Little River, CA 95456
707-937-4463


Yellow-bellied Sapsucker in Redwood Valley

Cheryl Watson
 

Sunday March 26, 2006

Geoff and I watched a male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker in Bruce and Ann
Gove's yard at Fisher Lake Drive in Redwood Valley this morning. The
bird was working the birch trees near the road until a Sharp-shinned
Hawk flew in, spooking the Sapsucker and two Mourning Doves.

The bird has been seen at this location for at least a week and the
three birches are easily visible from the road. They're in the front
yard of the first house on the right at the corner of Fisher Lake and
Tomki Road.

Cheryl Watson
Ukiah


Brown Pelican

Charlene McAllister
 

Today, Sunday, March 26 at MacKerricher State Park/Lake Cleone I saw a
single BROWN PELICAN flying overhead which Toby Tobkin tells me is an early
in the season sighting.



Charlene McAllister
P.O. Box 332
Little River, CA 95456
707-937-4463


Harlequin Ducks, Gray Jays

kmarianchild
 

In a book published in 1985 called "Birding Northern Çalifornia," found
by Vishnu at a garage sale, it mentions Harlequin Ducks at Van Damme
and Gray Jays at Russian Gulch. Does anyone know when they stopped
being at those locations?

Kate


Al continues

Stefan Schlick
 

As of around 4pm today, "Al", the Laysan Albatross, is still hanging
around at Arena Cove just west of Point Arena.

There also was a first-cycle Glaucous Gull in the field just north of
the Garcia bridge a few miles north of Point Arena and a drake
Harlequin Duck mixed in with a flock of Surf Scoters off the Point
Cabrillo lighthouse.

Stefan Schlick
Orangevale, CA


Yellow-headed Blackbirds/Lake County

Dave Woodward <dlwoodward@...>
 

A flock of about 40 Yellow-headed Blackbirds, all males, briefly
landed in the oaks in front of my house in SW Lakeport early this
afternoon. In the past 14 years, this is the third winter that fairly
large flocks of male Yellow-headed Blackbirds have been observed near
this area. Dave Woodward


eggs

kmarianchild
 

Well, I counted my eggs before they were laid. "My" Red-shouldered Hawks have ended up in a much less visible nest this year, about 100+ yards away. It's way high up in a crotch in a valley oak - a much more protected location than last year. I hope I didn't disturb them too much last year, or this year by watching when they were trying the nest on for size.

Kate


Cinnamon Teal at Lake Cleone

David Jensen
 

Wednesday, March 22, 2006. Yesterday evening an adult male Cinnamon Teal was found at the western end of Lake Cleone. These birds are seldom seen on the coast, although (at least) one pair successfully nested on a pond in the dunes at Stornetta Ranch last year.

On Sunday, March 19, a Caspian Tern flew north over Point Cabrillo.


March 21

Dave & Cathy Ortiz <ortiz@...>
 

This is from Birder's World Magazine. A friend saw a
segment of Nova on PBS recently about these birds:
"Hi-tech Barn Swallows

A couple of Minnesota Barn Swallows have raised the bar on the scale
of "Swallow IQ." For the past four years, a pair of Barn Swallows has
nested inside the lumberyard entryway at the Home Depot store in
Maplewood, Minnesota. At least one pair has learned that if they fly
a tight circle in front of the motion detector above the double doors
at the entry to the Home Depot, the doors open. Each bird then flies
one more loop as the doors open and swoops inside where the pair has
built a nest atop a small pipe near the ceiling. When a bird is ready
to leave, it flies a tight circle in front of the motion detector
inside the doorway and the doors again open for Home Depot's small
avian customers.

Keith Stomberg, a supervisor at the store, first noticed the birds
nesting inside in the summer of 2001. He was fascinated by their
apparent learned behavior and left them alone to raise their
families. It was a good place for the swallows to raise their young
because there were no predators or bad weather. The pair typically
raised two broods each year. When the birds returned to nest in 2003,
he contacted the staff of the Nongame Wildlife Program of the
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Wildlife biologist Joan Galli observed the nesting swallows and was
amazed to see how the birds had adapted to the unique setting in
order to raise their families. "We typically think of the crow family
and the parrot family as among the most intelligent of birds,"
according to Galli, "but apparently the swallows have a few tricks of
their own that help us appreciate how birds are constantly adapting
to survive in novel human-created environments."
-- Carrol Henderson"


Birds of Uganda benefit Friday, March 31

kmarianchild
 

Dear Friends, Please cut and paste (or forward) this article to your
friends who might want to come to see Matthew Matthiessen's astonishing
slideshow on Friday, March 31, 7 p.m., Ukiah Civic Center. Directions
at end of article.

“Birds of Uganda” Slideshow Flies Again!
Benefit for Peregrine Audubon Society

by Kate Marianchild

On a rainy evening in January 130 people explored the Albertine Rift,
hiked the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, and boated down the Nile River
with Matthew Matthiessen, creator of the slideshow “Birds of Uganda.”
We saw dozens, or was it hundreds, of birds of truly unbelievable
colors and shapes. Elephants, lions, giraffes, hippos, warthogs,
waterbuck, and monkeys flashed across the screen as Matthiessen awed us
with over 250 sharp, high-quality photographs. His snappy commentary,
which was always informative and often funny, was delivered entirely
without benefit of notes and included the African names of an entire
family of Mountain Gorillas. After the performance audience members
were overheard telling Matthiessen he should deliver this show all
across the country…it’s that good.

If you missed “Birds of Uganda,” or if you wish to see it again, you’re
in luck. Matthiessen is generously repeating his performance on Friday,
March 31, 7 p.m. at the Ukiah Civic Center as a benefit for Peregrine
Audubon Society. Come early as the presentation is likely to sell out.
Matthiessen's "Birds of Borneo" benefit last year played to a standing
room only crowd. The suggested donation is $7, with children under 12
admitted free of charge. No one will be turned away if they are unable
to meet this donation. (Directions below).

Matthiessen spent most of his time in the Albertine Rift looking for
birds rarely seen by humans, such as the Green-breasted Pitta and the
Grauer’s Broadbill. He searched the Nile River for the African
Shoebill, an elusive stork with a huge bill shaped like a shoe. While
seeking his "top five" he found and photographed numerous exotic birds,
including many species of Sunbirds, Bee-Eaters, Weavers, and
Cisticolas. Come find out if he found his top five on Friday, March 31!
And in the process support the educational and conservation work of
Peregrine Audubon Society.

The Ukiah Civic Center is at 300 Seminary Avenue. From 101 take Perkins
Street west to State Street (second light). Go left on State Street.
Seminary Avenue will be the fourth street on the right. Take it to the
end.

Kate Marianchild
Publicity Chair
Peregrine Audubon Society
katem@mcn.org
707-463-0839




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


"Al" the Laysan Albatross

Floyd Hayes
 

At Point Arena today, my family and I enjoyed watching
"Al" the LAYSAN ALBATROSS from 12:00-1:00 pm. Al
repeatedly drifted within 20 feet or so of the
shoreline and then would paddle back out a short
distance. Once he flew out a short distance and landed
in front of an incoming surfer who casually reached
out and touched Al. So amazing!

Yesterday at about 10:45 am I saw a PEREGRINE FALCON
fly over the highest point of the Boonville Road
between Boonville and Ukiah.

Floyd Hayes
Hidden Valley Lake, Lake County


Peregrine feeding in Ukiah Westside

Roger W. Foote <rfoote@...>
 

Saturday, March 18, 2006, 11:15 a.m. - - PEREGRINE FALCON observed
consuming a BAND-TAILED PIGEON in the oak at the SW corner of W Smith
and Hortense Streets in Ukiah's Westside. I first saw the bird fly
from the SE. It appeared to be of the anatum race and, as judged from
its large size, a female.

Several of us spent an hour watching from under the oak. The falcon
took note of automobile, roof construction and human noises, but
continued with its meal until its crop was bulging and all that was
left of the pigeon were a couple of bloody bones and a wing dangling
from its perch on the horizontal limb.

Roger Foote
Ukiah MEN, CA


Re: Slate-colored Junco

George Chaniot
 

Fri, 17 Mar 2006, 11:16 -- The SLATE-COLORED JUNCO just made another
appearance at my window feeder. It approaches and leaves through the live
oak along the fence and seems more wary that the Oregon Juncos. I also saw
it once in the eucalyptus across the fence.

George Chaniot
9430 West Road
Potter Valley, MEN, CA


Tricolored Blackbirds in Potter Valley

George Chaniot
 

Fri, 17 Mar 2006 -- This morning there was a flock of 40 TRICOLORED
BLACKBIRDS foraging on the ground in the Bald Eagle Vineyard on Burris Lane
in Potter Valley. It appeared to be a single-species flock, 7 males, 33
females. This is about the time of year when they have appeared the last
two years when they nested at a pond about 1/2 mile away.

George Chaniot
Potter Valley, MEN, CA


Slate-colored Junco

George Chaniot
 

Thu, 16 Mar 2006, 16:50 -- I just had a SLATE-COLORED JUNCO visit the
feeder at my study window. I've never seen one in California before.

George Chaniot
Potter Valley, MEN, CA

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