Date   

MendoCoast Audubon Pelagic

Robert J. Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

Sunday - 22 May 2005 - About twenty folks braved the choppy seas and swells
5-10 feet to look for our fine feathered friends out of Noyo Harbor. The
skies were clear and sunny and the visibility was excellent. Our
direction headed NW out of Noyo Harbor as Jason, the Trek II boat captain,
headed into the swells at a leisurely pace. We crossed the Noyo Canyon at
about 8 to 10 miles out. There were no extraordinary species seen, but we
did have great looks and photo opportunities for Black-footed Albatross
feeding on chum behind the boat. At least two of these birds were banded
(sorry...couldn't read the numbers). On the way back in at about 2:00 PM
the swells had grown to a point where Jason halted the boat outside the
harbor mouth, timed the waves perfectly, and went full-steam into the
harbor riding (surfing) on the back-side of a mega-wave. It is comforting
to have experience at the helm!

Here is a list of species seen:

Pacific Loon (1), Common Loon (1), Western Grebe (2), Black-footed
Albatross (80), Pink-footed Shearwater (10), Sooty Shearwater
(100+), Brown Pelican (2), Brandt's Cormorant (20), Double-crested
Cormorant (1), Pelagic Cormorant (5), Surf Scoter (25), Red-necked
Phalarope (12), California Gull (3), Western Gull (100), Glaucous-winged
Gull (1), Common Murre (350), Pigeon Guillemot (30), Cassin's Auklet (1),
Rhinoceros Auklet (5). Mammals .... Steller's Sea Lion (2), Northern
Fur Seal (1), California Sea Lion (7), Dall's Porpoise (2)

Many thanks to the Mendocino Coast Audubon Chapter, especially Charlene
McAllister, Ron LeValley (leader), Ginny and Warren Wade, and Toby Tobkin
for putting this trip together. This was the only spring 2005 trip
scheduled. The next scheduled pelagic trips out of Noyo Harbor are those
of Shearwater Journeys ( http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/copyright.html )
in August (three different days).

Good Birding. Bob Keiffer

Robert J. Keiffer
Principal Supt. of Agriculture
UC Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Road
Hopland, CA 95449
(707) 744-1424 FAX (707) 744-1040
HREC website: http://danrrec.ucdavis.edu/hopland/home_page.html

"It is not the critic who counts... not the one who points out how the
strong person stumbles... or where the doer of deeds could have done
better. The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena."
Theodore Roosevelt


buntings/hooded orioles, ash-throated flycatchers

kmarianchild
 

I saw a singing male lazuli bunting and heard the female responding two days ago, further up Round Mountain Ranch road (on the way to Heartland).

2-3 pairs of hooded orioles at the entrance to Sunset View trailer park. At least one hooded oriole baby has fledged. I saw it looking very unsure of itself, taking tentative flights and cheeping.

Bullock's Oriole nest near the gate into Round Mountain Ranch, but babies have fledged. It's an unusual nest, because it's not deeply pendulous - more globular, 5 inches in diameter, made with a lot of "Spanish moss." Jon climbed a tree hoping for photos, but we think the birds seem to have fledged since i discovered it, which was three days ago. I'm sure there are more nests around because there are quite a few bullock's orioles around there. Also in that vicinity: lots of chipping sparrows, western kingbirds, western bluebirds, lesser goldfinches, a white-tailed kite, a three-legged coyote. Really good birding and wildlifing around there.

I'm going to be checking out a golden eagle nest site later this week or weekend. It's a good view with a scope from a friend's house. He hasn't looked this year (if you can believe that!) but has seen golden eagles flying in the vicinity. I'd appreciate the company of someone with a scope.

I've been hearing and seeing ash-throated flycatchers, cassin's vireos, hutton's vireos, kingbirds, here where I live, and am sure there are nests nearby for all of the above, in addition to the numerous acorn woodpecker nests. Also blue-grey gnatcatchers up the hill a bit.

Known to have already fledged: bushtits, California towhees, hooded orioles, bullock's orioles, white-breasted nuthatches, lesser goldfinches, pacific slope flycatchers, hutton's vireos, nuttall's woodpeckers.

As of Friday Anna's Hummingbird and Blue-grey gnatcatcher females were still sitting on their nests

Twice now I've heard nuttall's woodpeckers making a prolonged rattly chatter, much longer and more insistent than their usual short trillip. Once I investigated and a cat was coming down out of a tree in the vicinity, but yesterday I saw now sign of predator. These birds have a buffy-brown area right above their bills (foreheads), which I've never seen before. For days I just been assuming they were juveniles, but now that I look my books show that brown only on Ladderbacks... I have a call in to Chuck to ask about that.

Has anyone ever heard of birds nesting in hollowed out oak galls? Not sure, didn't have time to study. Wondering about chipping sparrows...

Oh, Chuck Vaughn told me he's never seen anything but kites nest in mistletoe, but I saw a nest that looked more like the size of a jay or crow's nest in mistletoe the other day. Any thoughts on that? What does a kite's nest look like?

I know I'm forgetting some interesting items. I'm so nest-obsessed this year I can't keep track of it all!

Kate


More diary/hawk pix

kmarianchild
 

Hi All. This hawk diary business has become very time consuming!
Between watching and writing and orienting friends to the nest, and
entertaining friends who come to watch I'm finding it hard to get
anything else done! Eeek! But it's a labor of love and this opportunity
may never come again. Now my diaries are being printed in the Ukiah
Daily Journal, with Jon's incredible pictures, so I am working more on
the quality of the writing than I did on the installments I sent out
before. (You'll notice a little early repetition in this installment,
which is what I just sent to the Journal).

Unfortunately the Journal all of a sudden printed the first unedited
draft I had sent to them as a teaser at a point when I thought we were
still in the negotiation phase. So I've learned never to send anything
that I don't consider print-ready. But Richard, at the Journal, and I,
are developing a good working relationship.

Jon Klein has driven here from the coast three times now, and has spent
4.5 - 5.5 hours in the blind at a time. Again, please don't send his
photos on, or use them in any way without giving him credit. BTW, the
Journal is going to do a full story on him, with pix. Richard
interviewed him yesterday.

For those of you on Mendobirds, for some reasons the pictures don't
come through, but George Chaniot is posting them on the Peregrine
Audubon website.


----------



HAWK DIARIES (2ND INSTALLMENT FOR THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL)

Special to the Journal by Kate Marianchild

(This is the second installment of my diary about a red-shouldered hawk
family that lives near my home. I live in oak woodland northwest of
Ukiah. The nest is high in an oak tree, and is about 60 feet from my
viewpoint. The sex of the hawk baby is not known, but I have decided to
refer to her as a female in order to make the writing easier).

Sunday, May 8
Rain. The red-shouldered hawklet is growing by flights and bounds. She
spreads her grey-white wings and the breath catches in my throat. She’s
so young, and so new to her wings. One of the parents is keeping her
warm. I’ve learned that only half of bird babies survive until it’s
time to fledge, but I hope the numbers are a little higher among
raptors. I hope this baby will fly.

May 10
She survived the rain. She is 13 days old today.

Morning – A parent brought a lizard to the nest. I now hear peeping
when a parent arrives, even without food. The baby (my goddaughter!)
appears vigorous and has a good appetite. It's funny to see a sharply
aquiline profile on such a fuzzy head and body. Overall she appears to
be about the size and shape of a small crookneck squash.

The hawklet was left alone in nest for almost 3 minutes. She gazed
straight at me. The fleshy part at the top of her upper bill, the cere,
is starting to turn a light yellowish-green. Overall she is still
grey-white. She has about 30 more days to grow into her full size and
plumage before she fledges.

Late afternoon: Watched with Kayla. Kayla and I both thought we saw
something white fly out from the center of the nest. Projectile
pooping?

May 11
Sunny. Definitely saw something white ejected from inside the nest,
vicinity of baby. Projectile poop. What a talent. Big rodent arrived.
These parents are so competent! Jon Klein came and took pictures today.
He climbed an oak to get closer to the nest, and set up a blind of
green sheets and camo netting. Inside the blind is a structure of
lashed 2x4’s that he sits and leans on. It’s way out on a mossy
horizontal limb 25 feet off the ground. Ingenious. He figured out that
the adult who spends the most time at the nest and feeds the baby is
definitely the female. The male is smaller and has a greyer head.

May 12
Jon came back today for more pictures, and is up in the tree right now.
He's hoping for feeding pictures. I'm working on my laptop at the
landlubbers' viewing point.

The hawklet is too big to fit under her mother today, so she is sitting
and clambering around beside her. She appears to be about a third again
larger than she was yesterday! What if she falls out?

I hope something interesting happens so Jon can get good pictures.

Oh, here we go! Dad arrives, huge wings spread for landing, carrying a
baby rabbit. Rabbit transferred to Mom, who puts it down. Dad leaves
the nest immediately. Baby chirp-chirps. Mom looks around as if
pretending she doesn’t know the rabbit is there. Is she hoping the baby
will start feeding herself? More waiting. Finally Mom gives in and
tears off a chunk. She tips her head and delicately offers a morsel to
her baby. The next bite is way too big for baby so she gulps it down
herself. Mom has an absent-minded moment and drops a chunk of flesh on
her baby’s head.


May 12, 2005
I heard a commotion and came out of my house. High overhead a
red-shouldered hawk was screaming at a circling red-tailed hawk. He
screamed and screamed until the red tail nonchalantly drifted out of
“our” territory. I ran over to the nest. The baby was alone but OK. Had
Mom participated in the defense of the baby?

The little hawk was not very active today. I am worried that she is
sick. I couldn’t help but think how helpless the parents would be if
faced with a sick youngster. At around 6:30 p.m. the mother kept
tucking and pushing a big sprig of oak leaves around in the nest. Maybe
she’s trying to raise the floor, which must be pretty gunky by now.
Baby has started scratching and preening. The tips of her wing feathers
are turning black. They look like black fringe. The intervals when no
adult is at the nest are getting longer - maybe 8-10 minutes.

I have a burning question: where does the dad spend the night?

May 14, 2005
The mom is working at arranging lichen (old man’s beard). Does it help
control mites and vermin? The baby falls over a couple of times while
trying to move around in the nest. I wonder if she has a bad leg. Both
parents are away for 50 minutes – the longest absence yet. I hope they
haven’t abandoned the baby because she’s gimpy. I’ve become a very
anxious godmother!

Mother comes back carrying a branch with trailing lichen. Puts it on
the floor of the nest. Oh, I get it! When the baby falls over it’s
probably because she’s tripping on branches and twigs and lichen.

It’s after noon and the baby hasn’t eaten since 9:30. Mama’s clearly
wondering when Dad is going to come with food. She finds a dried up old
carcass lying around in the nest and tugs hard to get a few ratty
strands off of it. Baby chirps. Receives a skimpy morsel. Mom flies off
with the old carcass clutched in one talon. She calls from nearby, but
gets no response from Dad. She flies back and lands on a branch near
the nest, still carrying the carcass. She keeps looking around and
calling for her mate. I wonder if something has happened to him. She
flies back to the nest, still clutching carcass. More than an hour
later, at 1:21, Dad finally arrives with a rodent. A foodless interval
of almost 4 hours.

May 19
Baby much bigger. Her wingspan might be 24 inches! She survived the
latest unseasonable torrential downpours. She’s preening a lot, and
walking more confidently on edge of nest. But she looks like hell -
like a wad of cotton that got rolled around in dirty sand. It’s because
her dark colors are coming in. Mama appears to be eating lichen.

May 21
Jon in tree. It looks like Mama is eating mites off the baby. How? Does
she spear them with the hook on her bill? Dark banding is showing on
baby’s tail. No sign of baby feeding herself yet.

Jon comes down. He says my goddaughter is spoiled! Years ago he watched
another red-shouldered hawklet, and by this age both parents were away
from the nest most of the time. They would just drop off food and leave
the baby to feed itself. Once he saw them drop off a live snake. The
baby tried to swallow it live. The baby would get the snake halfway
down and then it would wriggle back out! Gross. Jim Armstrong is
watching a red-shouldered hawk nest right now, and “his” baby is alone
most of the day. My goddaughter has her mom with her most of the time,
and is still being fed.

May 22
I’ve been pondering the” spoiled baby” question. I have four theories:
1) the baby is delicate in some way and needs extra care; 2) she is a
slow learner; 3) there isn’t a lot of canopy above this nest, and one
parent has to be there most of the time for protection; 4) the dad is
such a good provider and the hunting is so good that this family can
afford to have a Stay-at-Home Mom. I lean toward the latter theory.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


spring season reporting

Robert J. Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

23 May 2005 - The spring reporting season is drawing to a close on May
31st. The spring period covers the months of March, April, and
May. Please send me any reports from this period that you wish pertaining
to bird observations. If you already posted the sighting on Mendobirds
then I already have it. When reporting rarities please report species,
date, location, numbers of individuals, and ALL observers. Also, please
note if you were the "discoverer" or a post-discover observer. I edit all
the records provided to me and submit the report to the four editors of
North American Birds - Middle Pacific Region. All of the raw data that I
receive is archived here at UC-HREC. Send to: rjkeiffer@ucdavis.edu

Please keep in mind that the up-coming Summer period is short covering only
two months - June and July. Although usually somewhat slow birding-wise,
however, some highlights can be expected. Species such as Northern
Parula (Caspar Cemetery) and Indigo Buntings (McNab Ranch, Dos Rios,
Ukiah-Boonville Road) and Blue Grosbeaks (Coast and Willits Valley) might
be found. Other late arrivals might be found in willow thickets along the
coast. High elevation birds in the Montane Forests (Hull Mountain, Bald
Mountain, Etsel Ridge, Anthony Peak) will be in "spring" season because of
the elevation ... so it is always a treat to escape the summer heat and
head to the high country to look for Black-chinned Sparrows, Dusky and
Hammond's Flycatchers, White-headed Woodpeckers, Townsend's Solitaires, and
Flammulated Owls. The end of the period at the tail-end of July should
produce early shorebird migrants heading south (Ukiah Sewage Treatment
Plant, Lake Mendocino, coastal mudflats).

Good Birding. Bob Keiffer

Robert J. Keiffer
Principal Supt. of Agriculture
UC Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Road
Hopland, CA 95449
(707) 744-1424 FAX (707) 744-1040
HREC website: http://danrrec.ucdavis.edu/hopland/home_page.html

"It is not the critic who counts... not the one who points out how the
strong person stumbles... or where the doer of deeds could have done
better. The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena."
Theodore Roosevelt


Purple Martin

Robert J. Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

Monday - 23 May 2005 - Last year Chuck Vaughn discovered a nesting pair of
Purple Martin's in a PGE line pole here at UC-HREC. I checked the site
today to find the female's head sticking out of the hole. Soon she left
to forage to the east over the Huntley Peak area. I did not see the male
...but am assuming that the pair is nesting again this year. Purple
Martin observations are always worth noting ...especially the inland
sites. Bob Keiffer

Robert J. Keiffer
Principal Supt. of Agriculture
UC Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Road
Hopland, CA 95449
(707) 744-1424 FAX (707) 744-1040
HREC website: http://danrrec.ucdavis.edu/hopland/home_page.html

"It is not the critic who counts... not the one who points out how the
strong person stumbles... or where the doer of deeds could have done
better. The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena."
Theodore Roosevelt


Marbled Murrelets off Little River Headlands

Charlene McAllister
 

May 20, 2005



At least three Marbled Murrelets were observed from Little River Headlands
this afternoon. One bird was solo and in mostly basic plumage, while the
other two, who were tightly paired were in high alternate plumage (are they
nesting very nearby?).



Sean McAllister

Charlene McAllister
P.O. Box 332
Little River, CA 95456
707-937-4463
charmac@mcn.org


Lake County

Frances Oliver <hummer52@...>
 

Forwarded from Ed Pandofino:

Yesterday Frances Oliver and I visited Lake County. Nothing spectacular to
report but we had good passerine diversity (e.g., every species of 'western'
warbler except Townsend's and Wilson's and all three vireos along Elk Mtn Rd)
despite winds and occasional drizzles.

Best bird was a PROBABLE COMMON TERN off-shore at Lakeport. Just too far
away for me to be 100% certain.

Also had PURPLE MARTINs along Red Hills Road, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT just
south of the Elk Mtn Road bridge over the Eel River (west of Lake Pillsbury). A
couple MacGillivray's Warblers were also in this vicinity. A calling ROCK WREN
above the Clear Lake Landfill site and YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDs at the marsh
off Robin Hill Dr. near the NW corner of the lake. More YH Blackbirds at
Borax Lake.


Ed Pandolfino


Fw: Painopepla

George Chaniot
 

From: "Karin Wandrei" <kwandrei@mcyp.org>
To: <MENDOBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2005 12:58:55 -0700

I was sitting in my hot tub this morning and looked up on my roof and
couldn't believe it but I saw a Phainopepla. Black bird about 8
inches long with very noticeable crest. I recognized it because I had seen
them in March in Tucson. According to Sibley we are a little north of their
range. I live on Pine Mountain in Willits at 2000ft - mixture of oak, fir,
madrone.

Karin Wandrei


Mendocino County May 13th and 14th

Jerry White <grwhite@...>
 

Two days of birding did not turn up a whole lot; with one exception.

The male Blue-winged Teal was seen at the Ukiah Treatment Ponds on Friday.
The Eurasian Collared-Doves were easily found both on Friday and Saturday on Duxbury and Stoneboro Rds near Manchester.

There was a flock of 16 Brant at the mouth of the Garcia River on Saturday.

Bonaparte's Gulls were in several locations including a bird in the small pond right off Highway 1 at the south end of Manchester.

While scoping a small flock of Bonaparte's on the Brush Creek lagoon on Friday an American Bittern briefly flew out and then back into the tules.This species is difficult to find in Mendocino and this is only the 3rd one I recall seeing in the county. Jerry


hawk pictures! diary

kmarianchild
 

These pictures (below) were taken by Jon Klein yesterday. He climbed an
oak to get closer to the nest, and has set up a blind with green sheets
and camo netting way out on a mossy horizontal limb. Pretty ingenious.
I have pictures of him climbing the tree, and pictures of the blind,
but on 35 mm. He came back today for more pictures, and is up in the
tree right now. The light is more diffuse today, so the shadows won't
be such a problem. He's hoping for some feeding pictures. I'm working
on my laptop at the landlubbers' viewing point, so I get to watch it
all.

The absent adult is crying in the distance right now, so maybe it won't
be long. (Jon is a young professional wildlife photographer, so please
don't do anything commercial with these pictures and credit him if you
send them on or use them in any way. And if you'd like to see more of
his work, and/or buy something from him, please contact him at
jon3klein@yahoo.com or 937-0067.

The hawklet is too big to fit under the mother today, so it is sitting
and clambering around beside her. Sometimes quite close to the edge.
Chastity, a Round Mountain denizen, I both started wondering about the
likelihood of it falling out today. I can't imagine how a second baby
would have fit in the nest. The baby is definitely chirping. I think
it's hungry right now. It appears to be about a third again larger than
it was yesterday!

Oh, here we go! A rodent was just dropped off. The adult is ignoring
it. Baby is cheeping away. Parent looks around as if wondering what all
the commotion's about. My guess is that she's hoping the baby will
start feeding itself....more waiting. Finally the parent gives in and
starts delicately proffering food. It's sunny again, so the light might
not be ideal for the pictures, but the birds are shifting positions
quite a bit during this feeding, so I bet Jon's getting some good
angles.

Now both adults are on the nest, with the baby between them, oriented
toward Jon. I hope he's getting some "proud parent" pictures. I laugh
out loud because they look so beautiful through my binoculars, and the
second adult flies off. Darn! Generally they seem pretty oblivious to
noise, but I'm pretty sure I startled him. Sorry Jon!

Jon came down and told me the male has the grayer head, is a little
smaller, and is definitely the one hunting. Or at least that was the
case today. It's good to have that question answered.


__________________________________________________

----------


Tricolored Blackbird survey - June

tinafabula <CFabula@...>
 

I have signed up as the Lake County coordinator for the statewide
tricolored blackbird survey effort (organized by EDAW) that will
happen June 3-5, 2005.

I would appreciate any one with information as to good places to look
for breeding tri-coloreds in Lake County to get ahold of me so we can
visit those spots or to report the information themselves.

Anyone interested in submitting their own information and/or doing
surveys on their own is also welcome.

Please contact me at: cfabula@dfg.ca.gov
Tina Fabula
Dept. of Fish and Game
(707) 944-5538
or my cell phone at:
(707) 738-0880

EDAW has posted a website for more information at:
http://www.tricoloredsurvey.com/home.aspx


Purple Martin

Robert J. Keiffer <rjkeiffer@...>
 

Thursday - 12 May 2005 - I observed one pair of Purple Martin atop a
streetlight post on the south end of Hopland at 8:00 AM. The Hwy 101
streetlight post is just south of "The Keg" (Where every night is Saturday
night) and directly across from Petro America gas station. It appeared as
though they were checking out the light/post for nesting. Bob Keiffer

Robert J. Keiffer
Principal Supt. of Agriculture
UC Hopland Research & Extension Center
4070 University Road
Hopland, CA 95449
(707) 744-1424 FAX (707) 744-1040
HREC website: http://danrrec.ucdavis.edu/hopland/home_page.html

"It is not the critic who counts... not the one who points out how the
strong person stumbles... or where the doer of deeds could have done
better. The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena."
Theodore Roosevelt


Osprey Nest

Jim Armstrong <jimarm@...>
 

For those heading out to Potter Valley on Sunday, look for the
replacement Osprey nest on top of the tallest high tension tower on
the ridge north of Highway 20; it pops into view at mile marker 34.54.
This nest was active last year, but was removed or blown down over the
winter. Due to the configuration of the tower, building materials
that don't stick to the nest are caught by the girders underneath,
making a two-story effect. The first good place to scope it is just
past the Marina turn (it is blocked from the big turn-out).
Best viewing is 100 feet or so past where Road B makes its right angle
turn to the north; take Road A as if you are heading for Fife
Vineyards.
It is huge lift from Lake Mendocino to this site and it seems likely
that materials and food may also come from ponds north of it.


MEN/So Cow Mt Greater Roadrunner

Chuck & Barbara Vaughn
 

Greetings Mendobirders- At 830 this morning, while doing bird transects, Jennifer Potts and I heard a Greater Roadrunner singing on the Mendocino County side of the BLM South Cow Mountain recreation area. The bird was in some of the lower chaparral immediately west and downslope from Lost Valley. Other birds of local interest were a Rufous-crowned Sparrow, an Olive-sided Flycatcher, Hairy Woodpeckers, and Nashville Warblers singing in seemingly every hardwood and mixed hardwood/knobcone pine grove up there.

Chuck



***********************************
Chuck and Barbara Vaughn
1550 Deerwood Drive
Ukiah, CA 95482

cevaughn@pacific.net


Re: gosling predators?

jack booth
 

I left out owls because their feeding habitats put out at a time when the goslings would be out of sight under mom. Great horned owls could kill a large goose easily but my guess is that it is unusual (anybody have more info). I do know that they occasionally kill wild turkeys off their roost. Great horned owls do kill striped skunks commonly. Jack

On May 11, 2005, at 9:09 AM, Feather Forestwalker wrote:






Kate Marianchild wrote:

What about turtles? do we have those in ponds on the coast?

Yes, but not American Crows - at least, not very regularly; this seems
to be the one area on the California coast where this species is not
seen with much regularity. . .Common Ravens are more than likely the
culprit, if we're looking at avian predators - but so are Northern
Harriers, Red-shouldered Hawks and, possibly, Cooper's Hawks - Barn and
Great-horned Owls come to mind......I haven't seen all of Jack's list -
mammals would include those I *do* see listed, as well as raccoons, gray
foxes, domestic cats, bobcats, etc.

The turtles are likely to be a species of western pond turtle, however,
so these are too small to eat gosling; I bet you're thinking of snapping
turtles - and I am not sure whether we have these as a native species on
the coast. Is possible that there are some introduced ones, however, and
at the Caspar Pond, *anything* is possible in that regard..

:)

Feather

On May 10, 2005, at 10:20 AM, Jack Booth wrote:



I also forgot to mention opposum, bullfrog, and large-mouth bass. Jack
On May 10, 2005, at 9:32 AM, B. Acord wrote:

Great list Jack. Also Common Ravens and American Crows. Corvids,
especially Ravens, will team up on the adults to split there
attention
till one of the goslings is vulnerable.

~Brian
--
******************************************************
Brian Acord
Graduate Research Assistant
Humboldt State University, Wildlife
Arcata, Humboldt County, California
humbirds@gmail.com
707-826-3581
******************************************************











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Nestwatching invitation/diary

kmarianchild
 

I will be holding an Open Nest on Saturday, May 14, from 9 a.m to noon.
Anyone interested in nest-watching should email me, and I will email
back directions. Scopes welcome. Digiscopes particularly welcome!

Who can tell me if raptor babies are fed whole, unregurgitated meat
from the moment of birth. I missed the first few days of this young
'uns life.

Diary

5/8,9 Rain. During the rain the feeding intervals may have been less
frequent (harder to hunt?). I think the baby was left alone less,
perhaps to prevent hypothermia. The adult on the nest seemed very
conscientious about keeping the baby warm and as dry as possible. I
worried that the baby might not survive, as I saw a red shouldered hawk
nest fail two years ago, when we had eight inches of rain in April. But
maybe that was an incubation failure. I couldn't see that nest well
enough to know what was going on.

5/10 (a.m.) Sunny day. Saw a parent bring a lizard to the nest. I now
hear peeping when a parent arrives, even without food. Baby appears
vigorous and has a good appetite. It's funny to see a sharply aquiline
profile on such a fuzzy head and body. The bird overall appears to be
about the size and shape of a small crookneck squash.

The baby was left alone in nest for almost 3 minutes. That's the
longest yet. During that time the baby was quite active, spreading its
wings, looking around. It gazed straight at me for a while. The upper
mandible is starting to turn yellowish - a light yellowish-green.
Overall the baby is still grey-white, but I might be seeing a little
bit of reddish fuzz appearing.

(p.m.) Watched with Kayla. An adult brought in a large
rodent, and transferred it to the sitting bird. Sitting bird became
standing bird and fed her/himself, and the baby. Saw long-worm-like
bits of meat. Intestines? Kayla and I both thought we saw something
white fly out of the nest. Projectile pooping? Or was it a moth flying
by? Baby left alone in nest for a couple of minutes. Was it trying to
tear food on its own? Don't think so, but maybe. I suppose the adults
will soon cut back on the tearing and proffering of food so the baby
will have to learn to feed itself.
This baby has to grow so much and learn so much in a mere 39-45 days.
When fledging time comes I hope I can watch around the clock.

5/11 (a.m.) Sunny day. Definitely saw something white ejected from
inside the nest, vicinity of baby. Must have been projectile pooping.
Quite a talent. Big rodent brought in. These parents are so competent!
Why have I never seen a red-shouldered hawk catch anything? I've never
even been aware that one was hunting. Mostly I see them sitting on
branches or flying around and calling. I'll have to watch longer.

To be continued..


Kate Marianchild
Publicity Chair
Peregrine Audubon Society
katem@mcn.org
707-463-0839


Re: gosling predators?

Feather Forestwalker <feather@...>
 

Kate Marianchild wrote:

What about turtles? do we have those in ponds on the coast?
Yes, but not American Crows - at least, not very regularly; this seems to be the one area on the California coast where this species is not seen with much regularity. . .Common Ravens are more than likely the culprit, if we're looking at avian predators - but so are Northern Harriers, Red-shouldered Hawks and, possibly, Cooper's Hawks - Barn and Great-horned Owls come to mind......I haven't seen all of Jack's list - mammals would include those I *do* see listed, as well as raccoons, gray foxes, domestic cats, bobcats, etc.

The turtles are likely to be a species of western pond turtle, however, so these are too small to eat gosling; I bet you're thinking of snapping turtles - and I am not sure whether we have these as a native species on the coast. Is possible that there are some introduced ones, however, and at the Caspar Pond, *anything* is possible in that regard..

:)

Feather

On May 10, 2005, at 10:20 AM, Jack Booth wrote:



I also forgot to mention opposum, bullfrog, and large-mouth bass. Jack
On May 10, 2005, at 9:32 AM, B. Acord wrote:

Great list Jack. Also Common Ravens and American Crows. Corvids,
especially Ravens, will team up on the adults to split there
attention
till one of the goslings is vulnerable.

~Brian
--
******************************************************
Brian Acord
Graduate Research Assistant
Humboldt State University, Wildlife
Arcata, Humboldt County, California
humbirds@gmail.com
707-826-3581
******************************************************







Fort Bragg Pelagic Trip

Charlene McAllister
 

Mendocino Coast Audubon Society Pelagic Trip

May 22nd, 8am-3pm.

$80.00 for non-members ($70.00 for members)



A few spaces still remain for this trip out of Noyo Harbor in Fort Bragg.
In late May, sightings should include many Sooty Shearwaters, some
Pink-Footed Shearwaters, and many Black-Footed Albatrosses. Laysan
Albatross is also possible There is a good chance to see any one of 3
species of Storm-Petrels (Fork-Tailed, Leach's, Ashy). Among the Alcids, we
should see Common Murres, Pigeon Guillemot, Cassin's Auklets, and perhaps
Marbled Murrelets and Tufted Puffins close to shore. Red Phalaropes may
still be around. There can be at least 5 species of dolphins possible, plus
several species of whales and pinnepeds.



But the special draw of any pelagic birding trip is the possibility of the
unexpected appearance of an out-of-range visitor flying in from
who-knows-where (Tasmania is not impossible), perhaps lingering to be
admired and exclaimed over, before disappearing into the vast sky.



For further information: Call Toby at 707-964-6216

To reserve a space contact Ginny Wade wwade@mcn.org









Charlene McAllister
P.O. Box 332
Little River, CA 95456
707-937-4463
charmac@mcn.org


Re: gosling predators?

kmarianchild
 

What about turtles? do we have those in ponds on the coast?


On May 10, 2005, at 10:20 AM, Jack Booth wrote:

I also forgot to mention opposum, bullfrog, and large-mouth bass. Jack
On May 10, 2005, at 9:32 AM, B. Acord wrote:

> Great list Jack. Also Common Ravens and American Crows. Corvids,
> especially Ravens, will team up on the adults to split there
attention
> till one of the goslings is vulnerable.
>
> ~Brian
> --
> ******************************************************
> Brian Acord
> Graduate Research Assistant
> Humboldt State University, Wildlife
> Arcata, Humboldt County, California
> humbirds@gmail.com
> 707-826-3581
> ******************************************************



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Re: baby talk

jack booth
 

I also forgot to mention opposum, bullfrog, and large-mouth bass. Jack

On May 10, 2005, at 9:32 AM, B. Acord wrote:

Great list Jack. Also Common Ravens and American Crows. Corvids, especially Ravens, will team up on the adults to split there attention till one of the goslings is vulnerable.

~Brian
--
******************************************************
Brian Acord
Graduate Research Assistant
Humboldt State University, Wildlife
Arcata, Humboldt County, California
humbirds@gmail.com
707-826-3581
******************************************************

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