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Ring-necked Ducks at Caspar Pond

Joanne Abramson
 

This morning a flock of Ring-necked Ducks are at Caspar Pond. 

Additionally, a male Bufflehead and three females. 


Caspar Pond Snow Geese Update

Joanne Abramson
 

At 10:30 am Tuesday, Nov. 22, only the single immature Snow Goose remained.

Additionally, three Canadian Geese were seen.

There are now two Northern Shoveler females, in addition to the Bufflehead females, and the Ruddy duck. 


Caspar Pond

Jessica Morton
 

Seen Sunday at 1 p.m., the Caspar Pond juvenile Snow Goose now has a light morph Snow Goose buddy. 2 Ruddy Ducks and the continuing female Northern Shoveler were also seen, with two of the usual Pied-Billed Grebe.


Nashville Warbler, MCBG

Tim Bray
 

16 November 2022 - On the monthly "Early Bird" walk at the Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, we tallied a remarkable 63 species of birds. The best was a Nashville Warbler in the "flannel bush" near the north trail adjacent to the equipment yard (same place we had Hooded Orioles last year).

Our species count was helped by six identified species of Gulls (Western, California, Herring, Glaucous-winged, Heermann's, Short-billed). We also had a tantalizing fly-by glimpse of a very pale Gull - possibly a Glaucous, but none of us saw it well enough to be sure.  

Flights of Pacific Loons and Surf Scoters are picking up. There was a near-constant stream of Loons flying south, low over the ocean a mile or two out, and occasional large flocks (100+) of Surf Scoters also going south.

eBird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S122533820


Lewis’s Woodpecker

Roger Foote
 

I refound the Lewis’s Woodpecker yesterday, November 15, 2022, at 3:50 pm at the King Ranch corrals on the east side of Old River Road. This was the same location that Chuck Vaughn reported a LEWO on Tuesday, November 14, 2022. 

Roger Foote 
Ukiah CA


Re: Likely Blackburnian Warbler at Ukiah Wastewater Treatment Plant

John Sterling
 

Nice find of a blackburnian warbler!


John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

On Nov 15, 2022, at 5:33 PM, geogibbs via groups.io <ggibbs@...> wrote:

11/15/22

I believe I had a Blackburnian Warbler at UWWTP this morning.  I had to spend a bit of time studying my distant (poor) photos but this seems to be the best overall fit.  Details and photos https://ebird.org/checklist/S122481941

It was in the NE corner of the plant along the river.  It was associating with a late Black-throated Gray Warbler but didn’t seem quite as active and wasn’t accommodating like the BTGW.

Any feedback or ID suggestion is welcome!

George Gibbs
Ukiah


Likely Blackburnian Warbler at Ukiah Wastewater Treatment Plant

geogibbs
 

11/15/22

I believe I had a Blackburnian Warbler at UWWTP this morning.  I had to spend a bit of time studying my distant (poor) photos but this seems to be the best overall fit.  Details and photos https://ebird.org/checklist/S122481941

It was in the NE corner of the plant along the river.  It was associating with a late Black-throated Gray Warbler but didn’t seem quite as active and wasn’t accommodating like the BTGW.

Any feedback or ID suggestion is welcome!

George Gibbs
Ukiah


Caspar Pond

Jessica Morton
 

Ongoing at Caspar Pond since at least last weekend, a juvenile Snow Goose, usually feeding on the grass on the south side of the pond.


Lewis's Woodpecker Hopland/Ukiah area 11/15

Chuck & Barbara Vaughn
 

Greetings Mendobirders- This morning there was a Lewis's Woodpecker at
the King Ranch on Old River Road. The bird was in the trees adjacent to
the corrals. This is at the bend in the road just north of the King home.

Chuck



--
Chuck and Barbara Vaughn
Ukiah, CA


Rock Sandpiper Laguna Pt

Roger Adamson
 

Chris Lamoureux reports a Rock Sandpiper seen at Laguna Point this afternoon among a group of roosting Black Turnstones. I hope it stays a while.
Roger Adamson for Chris


Long-tailed Duck photo

Roger Adamson
 

Thanks to Doug and Joe for notes regarding the Long-tailed Duck plumages-always more to learn. I have posted a (poor) photo of the Long-tailed Duck (it resembles a charcoal drawing!) taken late in dusk with ISO 20,000! But it is clearly a LTDU. Which plumage is it?
See the eBird list:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S122330148

I also added a few photos (Bald Eagle, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Band-tailed Pigeon) to our list that included birds from Navarro River to Stoneboro Rd. We had a great day that encompassed a total of 80 species--this was the Raptor Run for Mendo Coast Audubon.
https://ebird.org/checklist/S122326794

Roger Adamson
Fort Bragg


Re: Long-tailed Duck, and a fun fact about Long-taileds and a good excuse when having trouble identifying them

Joe Morlan
 

Maybe. But this is what I wrote concerning a SY male Long-tailed Duck at
Baker Beach, San Francisco, 17 February 2022....

"This species has a complex series of plumages that is often explained by
invoking a presupplemental molt. Males have two different "ornamental"
plumages and a so-called "eclipse" plumage. However Pyle (2008) and Howell
(2010) both question the existence of a supplemental plumage in this
species. The three apparent plumage aspects can better be explained by
overlapping prebasic and prealternate molts."


On Sun, 13 Nov 2022 20:43:27 +0000 (UTC), "Doug Forsell via groups.io"
<djforsell@...> wrote:

In September of 1976 when I was working off of a ship in theArctic collecting long-tailed ducks for food habits studies, we were having aterrible time Identifying the bird's age and sex by plumage. A couple ofweeks later when we returned to our lab. we found out that long-tailed ducks arethe only species of duck with three molts.
In Birds of the World this is calleda presupplemental molt and the juvenilesalso have one. This means that there are two fall juvenile plumages, two fall adult female plumages, and two fall adult male plumages possible. While the presupplementalmolts are only partial and should be over by now, some feathers may remain intofall.
This is the reason that Long-taileds can be difficult to sex and age infall.


Regards,
Doug
Doug Forselldjforsell@... 884-1514

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Bray <tbray@...>
To: Mendobirds@groups.io <Mendobirds@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Nov 12, 2022 8:01 pm
Subject: [Mendobirds] Long-tailed Duck, Garcia River mouth

12 November 2022 - On the MCAS "Raptor Run" field trip we found an apparent juvenile Long-tailed Duck in the Garcia River estuary, near the river mouth. There are a number of ducks present and it took us a while to notice this bird. It was initially found near a Common Loon and the size disparity made the duck look tiny. It was
foraging a lot and we got brief looks at it between dives, but enough to establish the ID. It has a pale face with a dark eye and a darker patch (but not black like an adult female) behind the cheek.
--
Cheers,
Tim
Mendocino Coast Audubon Society
Ecology Hour
Oak & Thorn
Facebook: Oak and Thorn



--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Re: Long-tailed Duck, and a fun fact about Long-taileds and a good excuse when having trouble identifying them

Doug Forsell
 

In September of 1976 when I was working off of a ship in the Arctic collecting long-tailed ducks for food habits studies, we were having a terrible time Identifying the bird's age and sex by plumage. A couple of weeks later when we returned to our lab. we found out that long-tailed ducks are the only species of duck with three molts. In Birds of the World this is called a presupplemental molt and the juveniles also have one. This means that there are two fall juvenile plumages, two fall adult female plumages, and two fall adult male plumages possible. While the presupplemental molts are only partial and should be over by now, some feathers may remain into fall. This is the reason that Long-taileds can be difficult to sex and age in fall.

Regards,

Doug

Doug Forsell
djforsell@...
707 884-1514


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Bray <tbray@...>
To: Mendobirds@groups.io <Mendobirds@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Nov 12, 2022 8:01 pm
Subject: [Mendobirds] Long-tailed Duck, Garcia River mouth

12 November 2022 - On the MCAS "Raptor Run" field trip we found an apparent juvenile Long-tailed Duck in the Garcia River estuary, near the river mouth. There are a number of ducks present and it took us a while to notice this bird. It was initially found near a Common Loon and the size disparity made the duck look tiny. It was foraging a lot and we got brief looks at it between dives, but enough to establish the ID. It has a pale face with a dark eye and a darker patch (but not black like an adult female) behind the cheek.


Long-tailed Duck, Garcia River mouth

Tim Bray
 

12 November 2022 - On the MCAS "Raptor Run" field trip we found an apparent juvenile Long-tailed Duck in the Garcia River estuary, near the river mouth. There are a number of ducks present and it took us a while to notice this bird. It was initially found near a Common Loon and the size disparity made the duck look tiny. It was foraging a lot and we got brief looks at it between dives, but enough to establish the ID. It has a pale face with a dark eye and a darker patch (but not black like an adult female) behind the cheek.


Snow bunting

Diane Hichwa
 

I met a S Cal birder today, Nancy Herron, who has been visiting at Sea Ranch.

On Monday Nov. 7 she stopped at Schooner Gulch in the afternoon and saw a Snow Bunting.

Maybe the same bird heading south?

 

Diane Hichwa

 

Email: dhichwa@...

 

Telephone: 707-785-1922 (Sea Ranch)

707-483-3130 (cell)

More Tail Wagging!!! Less Barking!!

Millie 2007


Re: Short-eared Owl off Lighthouse Point

Jim Havlena
 

Another piece of information regarding Short-eared Owls is that clapping loudly in a brushy habitat can cause them to lift up from the brush and then drop back down.   I've done this numerous times in the Carrizo Plan in eastern San Luis Obispo county (during CBCs).
Jim Havlena


On 11/9/2022 4:46 PM, Tim Bray wrote:

9 November 2022 - Scoping off Lighthouse Point I watched a Peregrine Falcon fly out to sea and begin harrying what looked like another raptor. After some dive-bombing drama the second bird turned and flew toward the Point, and as it got closer I could see it was a Short-eared Owl. (The "flappy" flight was the first clue, then I could see the rounded wings, blunt head and finally the dark carpals.) The Peregrine eventually returned to the beach, at which point the Owl reversed course and flew back out to sea, eventually disappearing into the low clouds offshore. Seems like very odd behavior for an Owl, but then, Short-eared are rather odd Owls.

If you find yourself near an open grassy or brushy meadow at dusk, watch for that characteristic flight habit. Sometimes described as "moth-like," Short-eared Owls fly with deep, exaggerated up-and-down wingbeats. They flap-and-glide low over fields, much like Harriers, but those wingbeats really set them apart.
For example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwAAKxdUVLY



Palm Warbler Lake Cleone

Roger Adamson
 

Chris Lamoureux reported a Palm Warbler at Lake Cleone on the north side near the pump house.

Roger Adamson for Chris Lamoureux


Caspar Pond Ducks (and Geese)

Jessica Morton
 

Seen at Caspar Pond shortly before 5 on Wednesday: continuing female NOSH (still doing her spin-feeding), a female Hooded Merganser fly-in, followed shortly after by 10 CAGO.


Short-eared Owl off Lighthouse Point

Tim Bray
 

9 November 2022 - Scoping off Lighthouse Point I watched a Peregrine Falcon fly out to sea and begin harrying what looked like another raptor. After some dive-bombing drama the second bird turned and flew toward the Point, and as it got closer I could see it was a Short-eared Owl. (The "flappy" flight was the first clue, then I could see the rounded wings, blunt head and finally the dark carpals.) The Peregrine eventually returned to the beach, at which point the Owl reversed course and flew back out to sea, eventually disappearing into the low clouds offshore. Seems like very odd behavior for an Owl, but then, Short-eared are rather odd Owls.

If you find yourself near an open grassy or brushy meadow at dusk, watch for that characteristic flight habit. Sometimes described as "moth-like," Short-eared Owls fly with deep, exaggerated up-and-down wingbeats. They flap-and-glide low over fields, much like Harriers, but those wingbeats really set them apart.
For example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwAAKxdUVLY


Caspar Pond NOSH

Jessica Morton
 

At 12:30 Tuesday, a female Northern Shoveler was feeding in Caspar Pond, in a Phalarope circling manner at the southeast corner.

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