Topics

RIP JAMS

Eric Selje
 

I've mentioned this in the meetings that this day was coming, and today it's here. My contact in Indianapolis and I have successfully transferred all of the data from JAMS into the national case management system for the federal courts. Under the hood that's from DBF files to Informix.

I started working on JAMS when I first came to the courts in 1991. In 1995 I began a conversion to a Windows version using VFP 3, then 5, then... up to 9. That program was awesome, so of course the courts picked something else when they created a national system. To their credit they picked a web based app, but it's pretty much the worst interface you can imagine and hasn't changed since 1999.

Anyway, it's a bittersweet day here for me. I probably won't deal with this app, my baby, ever again.

Eric

Cliff
 

These are difficult things to face, but consider that you created something beautiful that worked well. I had a similar thing with a DBMS I built for a number of counties before the days of windows - it worked well and was fast (all written in C with a C DB & ISAM lib). The state mandated changes and it was abandoned.

I think you need to look not at what happens to your projects in ways you have no control over, but how true you held to your programming ideals in the creation. When you can say: 'this is art and it also is functional', then that's good enough, especially when it is art (and art encompasses much more than the visible product). Everything is ephemeral and a lot of things fall prey to dumb luck and ignorance. Tip a pint to your creation every so often and reminisce with a glimmer in your eye...



--
Cliff
Cliff Smith / HawkRidge Enterprises
(608) 647-2366 / cliff@...

On 5/1/2020 10:24 AM, Eric Selje wrote:
I've mentioned this in the meetings that this day was coming, and today it's here. My contact in Indianapolis and I have successfully transferred all of the data from JAMS into the national case management system for the federal courts. Under the hood that's from DBF files to Informix.

I started working on JAMS when I first came to the courts in 1991. In 1995 I began a conversion to a Windows version using VFP 3, then 5, then... up to 9. That program was awesome, so of course the courts picked something else when they created a national system. To their credit they picked a web based app, but it's pretty much the worst interface you can imagine and hasn't changed since 1999.

Anyway, it's a bittersweet day here for me. I probably won't deal with this app, my baby, ever again.

Eric

Eric Selje
 

Aw that's beautiful man.


On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 12:25 PM Cliff <cliff@...> wrote:

These are difficult things to face, but consider that you created something beautiful that worked well. I had a similar thing with a DBMS I built for a number of counties before the days of windows - it worked well and was fast (all written in C with a C DB & ISAM lib). The state mandated changes and it was abandoned.

I think you need to look not at what happens to your projects in ways you have no control over, but how true you held to your programming ideals in the creation. When you can say: 'this is art and it also is functional', then that's good enough, especially when it is art (and art encompasses much more than the visible product). Everything is ephemeral and a lot of things fall prey to dumb luck and ignorance. Tip a pint to your creation every so often and reminisce with a glimmer in your eye...



--
Cliff
Cliff Smith / HawkRidge Enterprises
(608) 647-2366 / cliff@...

On 5/1/2020 10:24 AM, Eric Selje wrote:
I've mentioned this in the meetings that this day was coming, and today it's here. My contact in Indianapolis and I have successfully transferred all of the data from JAMS into the national case management system for the federal courts. Under the hood that's from DBF files to Informix.

I started working on JAMS when I first came to the courts in 1991. In 1995 I began a conversion to a Windows version using VFP 3, then 5, then... up to 9. That program was awesome, so of course the courts picked something else when they created a national system. To their credit they picked a web based app, but it's pretty much the worst interface you can imagine and hasn't changed since 1999.

Anyway, it's a bittersweet day here for me. I probably won't deal with this app, my baby, ever again.

Eric

Andrew MacNeill
 

My condolences.....it’s good to know that the replacement app is better than the older one but no so much when you can see the holes in it

On May 5, 2020, 8:41 PM -0400, Eric Selje <eric.selje@...>, wrote:
Aw that's beautiful man.

On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 12:25 PM Cliff <cliff@...> wrote:

These are difficult things to face, but consider that you created something beautiful that worked well. I had a similar thing with a DBMS I built for a number of counties before the days of windows - it worked well and was fast (all written in C with a C DB & ISAM lib). The state mandated changes and it was abandoned.

I think you need to look not at what happens to your projects in ways you have no control over, but how true you held to your programming ideals in the creation. When you can say: 'this is art and it also is functional', then that's good enough, especially when it is art (and art encompasses much more than the visible product). Everything is ephemeral and a lot of things fall prey to dumb luck and ignorance. Tip a pint to your creation every so often and reminisce with a glimmer in your eye...



--
Cliff
Cliff Smith / HawkRidge Enterprises
(608) 647-2366 / cliff@...

On 5/1/2020 10:24 AM, Eric Selje wrote:
I've mentioned this in the meetings that this day was coming, and today it's here. My contact in Indianapolis and I have successfully transferred all of the data from JAMS into the national case management system for the federal courts. Under the hood that's from DBF files to Informix.

I started working on JAMS when I first came to the courts in 1991. In 1995 I began a conversion to a Windows version using VFP 3, then 5, then... up to 9. That program was awesome, so of course the courts picked something else when they created a national system. To their credit they picked a web based app, but it's pretty much the worst interface you can imagine and hasn't changed since 1999.

Anyway, it's a bittersweet day here for me. I probably won't deal with this app, my baby, ever again.

Eric

Eric Selje
 

It's all good - I got a blog post out of it!


E


On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 8:58 PM Andrew MacNeill <akselsoft@...> wrote:
My condolences.....it’s good to know that the replacement app is better than the older one but no so much when you can see the holes in it
On May 5, 2020, 8:41 PM -0400, Eric Selje <eric.selje@...>, wrote:
Aw that's beautiful man.

On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 12:25 PM Cliff <cliff@...> wrote:

These are difficult things to face, but consider that you created something beautiful that worked well. I had a similar thing with a DBMS I built for a number of counties before the days of windows - it worked well and was fast (all written in C with a C DB & ISAM lib). The state mandated changes and it was abandoned.

I think you need to look not at what happens to your projects in ways you have no control over, but how true you held to your programming ideals in the creation. When you can say: 'this is art and it also is functional', then that's good enough, especially when it is art (and art encompasses much more than the visible product). Everything is ephemeral and a lot of things fall prey to dumb luck and ignorance. Tip a pint to your creation every so often and reminisce with a glimmer in your eye...



--
Cliff
Cliff Smith / HawkRidge Enterprises
(608) 647-2366 / cliff@...

On 5/1/2020 10:24 AM, Eric Selje wrote:
I've mentioned this in the meetings that this day was coming, and today it's here. My contact in Indianapolis and I have successfully transferred all of the data from JAMS into the national case management system for the federal courts. Under the hood that's from DBF files to Informix.

I started working on JAMS when I first came to the courts in 1991. In 1995 I began a conversion to a Windows version using VFP 3, then 5, then... up to 9. That program was awesome, so of course the courts picked something else when they created a national system. To their credit they picked a web based app, but it's pretty much the worst interface you can imagine and hasn't changed since 1999.

Anyway, it's a bittersweet day here for me. I probably won't deal with this app, my baby, ever again.

Eric