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Robert Moore
 

From: Meteorological Technology World Expo 2019 <meteorological.expo.2019@...>

American meteorologists have written to the US Federal Communications Commission to raise concerns over potential disruptions caused by sharing a particular bandwidth with 5G telecommunication companies.

The American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society, and the National Weather Association, have all raised concerns over sharing the 1675-1680MHz band with terrestrial communications because of the likelihood of interference with weather satellite imagery and relayed environmental data to receive-only antennas.

According to the letter, NOAA’s GOES-R satellites have several space-to-earth transmissions in, or adjacent to, the 1675-1680MHz band, most notably, the Data Collection Platform Relay and GOES-R Rebroadcast.

The letter states, “The prospect of rule-making in this band without a fully informed record is deeply concerning because the non-federal weather services resulting from real-time data transmitted in, and adjacent to, the 1675-1680MHz band are crucially important for public safety and scientific research. The proceeding RM-11681 is complete with responses from a substantial number of stakeholders across the weather, water and climate enterprise and weather-sensitive industries that provide a compelling basis to not proceed with a sharing arrangement.”

The letter asks for a ruling on the sale of the bandwidth to be suspended or delayed until further research has been submitted by NOAA.




Robert

geojohnt@...
 

Robert,

This takes me back many years - way back to the days of RIG and the then UK Radio Communications Agency who allowed wide area paging transmissions in, and adjacent to, the 137 - 138 MHz weather satellite band leading to the serious interference we amateurs were experiencing.

They tested all our then receivers and many meetings later - we got nowhere.
Commercial 'money talks.'

However, the RA then gave me a seat on the UK SG7 Science Services Committee to represent amateur users of the 'weather satellite bands.'
I was still attending meetings as a member well into GEO.
This committee dealt with all UK applications for spectrum access to spectrum assigned to scientific services - weather and earth observation satellite and radio astronomy, etc and adjacent to it.
These were mostly commercial companies in the mobile communications industry.
And it liaised with worldwide 'communications agencies' to harmonise 'Earth-space, space-Earth spectrum allocations.
These were then all sorted out at the WMO in Geneva.

And of course, the RA - and now Ofcom - sold off chunks of spectrum for commercial purposes.
There were frequent 'demands' for spectrum adjacent to the then user dissemination channels of Meteosat.

Fortunately for us MSG-1 shortly after launch, and during commissioning, blew its power amps and was not able to disseminate data to users in the usual way.
Hence experimenting in using the then ATOVS service which was being transmitted from a commercial TV satellite (Hotbird?) in DVB-S-1 to disseminate EUMETSAT's and global geostationary meteorological data to users.

The rest, of course, is history.
'We are safe' but obviously there is still a growing need for spectrum access - and very little free space - leading to adjacent and/or frequency sharing.

Actually, new Inverto LNB's now have a built in 4G filter.
I'n not sure how 4G might effect our signal.
Perhaps there is an expert out there who might know about this?

Regards,
John.

   


In a message dated 29/07/2019 10:14:34 GMT Standard Time, rsmoore@... writes:

From: Meteorological Technology World Expo 2019 <meteorological.expo.2019@...>

American meteorologists have written to the US Federal Communications Commission to raise concerns over potential disruptions caused by sharing a particular bandwidth with 5G telecommunication companies.

The American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society, and the National Weather Association, have all raised concerns over sharing the 1675-1680MHz band with terrestrial communications because of the likelihood of interference with weather satellite imagery and relayed environmental data to receive-only antennas.

According to the letter, NOAA’s GOES-R satellites have several space-to-earth transmissions in, or adjacent to, the 1675-1680MHz band, most notably, the Data Collection Platform Relay and GOES-R Rebroadcast.

The letter states, “The prospect of rule-making in this band without a fully informed record is deeply concerning because the non-federal weather services resulting from real-time data transmitted in, and adjacent to, the 1675-1680MHz band are crucially important for public safety and scientific research. The proceeding RM-11681 is complete with responses from a substantial number of stakeholders across the weather, water and climate enterprise and weather-sensitive industries that provide a compelling basis to not proceed with a sharing arrangement.”

The letter asks for a ruling on the sale of the bandwidth to be suspended or delayed until further research has been submitted by NOAA.