Topics

EUTMETCast DVB-S2 Unable to lock


Quentin P.A. Leroy
 

Hello,

I'm trying to put together a EUMETCast DVB-S2 pipeline and I'm working with the Ayecka SR1 receiver device.
All the hardware is now installed and connected and I believe the antenna is well enough aligned to EUTELSAT 10A.
I followed carefully the Ayecka SR1 DVB Receiver EUMETCast Setup Guide to configure the SR1 device but it remains impossible to sustainably lock on the signal.

Could someone help with troubleshooting?

I'm new to this group and I don't know what relevant information to provide about my setup, so please ask for more details.

Thank you
Greetings,

Quentin
From the Netherlands


David J Taylor GM8ARV 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 🇪🇺
 

Hello,

I'm trying to put together a EUMETCast DVB-S2 pipeline and I'm working with the Ayecka SR1 receiver device.
All the hardware is now installed and connected and I believe the antenna is well enough aligned to EUTELSAT 10A.
I followed carefully the Ayecka SR1 DVB Receiver EUMETCast Setup Guide to configure the SR1 device but it remains impossible to sustainably lock on the signal.

Could someone help with troubleshooting?

I'm new to this group and I don't know what relevant information to provide about my setup, so please ask for more details.

Thank you
Greetings,

Quentin
From the Netherlands
=========================================

Quentin,

Two immediate thoughts:

- what size dish are you using?

- the signal is quite weak and it's easy to set the antenna for 9A rather than 10A

There are some TV channels coming from that satellite (others will have details) and these can be rather stronger and it may be an idea to try one of those channels first. Antenna alignment is critical: azimuth, elevation, LNB skew (rotation), and focus (in and out to the dish, often limited movement). There's a list of channels here:

https://www.lyngsat.com/Eutelsat-10A.html

somewhat up-to-date, but not perfect. Keep trying!

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


Quentin P.A. Leroy
 

David,

Thank you for your quick reaction.

My antenna is 90cm diameter off-axis dish.

The signal input level is around -24dBm according to the Ayecka device, which is rather strong I would say.
So in terms of alignment problem, with such a signal level, the only possible issue is that it's looking at another satellite, isn't?
According to the satellites disposition on the horizon, once the azimuth is pointing at a satellite, elevation, LNB skew and focus are only influencing the signal input level, right?

Trying to lock on a stronger signal first seems to be a good idea.

How exactly can I try one of those TV channels?
Is it just a question of tuner frequency?

Greetings,
Quentin


Hendrik Fleming
 

Hi Quentin,
  if you have a spectrum analyzer or SDR available, the easiest is to have a look at Eutelsat 10's beacons. I normally look at beacon 1 at 10.950GHz, Horizontal polarized. Here is a pic of what the beacon should look like.
If you have any questions about it, just ask

Regards
Hendrik


Hendrik Fleming
 

Here is also a view of both transponders. Transponder C10 carrying HVS2 is about 6dB weaker than transponder C4 that carries the BASIC and HSV-1 services.



Regards
Hendrik


Herman Vijlbrief
 

Hello Quentin,

Two years ago i changed mij 90 cm dish for a 125 cm dish.
It also seems to remain impossible to lock the signal on that new dish.
In my case I was pointing to the wrong satellite.
Careful alignment of the dish did the trick.
Worth to give it a try...

In Hoofddorp near Amsterdam I got a SNR level of about 11 - 12 dB with the 90 CM dish.
Enough to get the basic service...

Succes Quentin!

Groeten, Herman





Op 27-8-2020 om 15:55 schreef qle@...:

Hello,

I'm trying to put together a EUMETCast DVB-S2 pipeline and I'm working with the Ayecka SR1 receiver device.
All the hardware is now installed and connected and I believe the antenna is well enough aligned to EUTELSAT 10A.
I followed carefully the Ayecka SR1 DVB Receiver EUMETCast Setup Guide to configure the SR1 device but it remains impossible to sustainably lock on the signal.

Could someone help with troubleshooting?

I'm new to this group and I don't know what relevant information to provide about my setup, so please ask for more details.

Thank you
Greetings,

Quentin
From the Netherlands


Quentin P.A. Leroy
 

Hendrik, Herman,

Thank you very much for your help!
I can eventually have access to a spectrum analyser or SDR, but it will take a bit of time.
Those screenshots are nonetheless very instructive.
And similar other user experience is always reassuring.

I have a good news! I just managed to lock on a signal. Partially.

Here is part of my serial interface:
================================================================================
SR1c Serial No. 103763  30AAC                              Run Time:  149:45:34
SW Ver  1.05b265  V     HW Ver  2.02    FW Ver  2.02b022 V      BL Ver  1.01b15

RX1: Active, Locked
 EUMETCast DVB-S 1376.000 MHz, DVB-S QPSK 5/6, 29.896 Msps, CCM, 11.5 dB
[..]
and here is the status:

RX Status 1, Configuration 1
============================
1. Tuner Status                         Locked
2. Demodulator Status             Locked
3. Transport Status                   Not Locked
4. Demodulator Frequency Offset         -1435 KHz
5. Demodulator Es/N0                    11.3 dB
6. Signal Input Level                   -25.0 dBm
7. Demodulator BER                      0.00 e-7
8. Bad Frame Count                      0
9. Bad Packet Count                     0
A. Demodulator Link Margin              4.0 dB
B. Modulation Order and Code Rate       DVB-S QPSK 5/6
C. Link Adaptation                      CCM
D. Pilots                               Off
E. Frame Type                           Normal
F. Roll Off                             35%
G. FPGA                                 Loaded

and here is my configuration set 1:
Configuration Set 1
===================
        1. Tuner Frequency              1376.000 MHz
        2. Tuner Acquisition Bandwidth  10.000 MHz
        3. Standard                     DVB-S
        4. Coding Mode                  CCM
        5. Symbol Rate                  Auto
        6. MODCOD                       Auto
        7. RollOff                      Auto
        8. Pilot                        Auto
        9. Spectral Inversion           Auto
        A. Gold Code                    0
        B. Frame Type                   Auto
        C. Encapsulation                MPEG-TS
        D. ISI                          1
        E. Filters Table
        F. LNB power                    18V
        G. LNB compensation             Off
        H. 22 KHz                       On
        I. Status                       Active
        J. Profile Name                 EUMETCast DVB-S
        K. DiSEqC Switch Control        SAT A
        L. DiSEqC General Command       0x0
        M. Tuner Filter Bandwidth       72.000 MHz

So the transport layer is still not locked.
I don't know exactly what signal am I actually receiving. It doesn't seem to correspond to either transponder C4 or C10, basic service nor HVS, based on the MODCOD.
Thus I guess the ISI and RX Transport Filter Table I set up for EUMETCast is not corresponding to what I receive.

Would you have an idea of what this signal is or how could I find out with those information?

Greetings,
Quentin


David J Taylor GM8ARV 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 🇪🇺
 

Hendrik, Herman,

Thank you very much for your help!
I can eventually have access to a spectrum analyser or SDR, but it will take a bit of time.
Those screenshots are nonetheless very instructive.
And similar other user experience is always reassuring.

I have a good news! I just managed to lock on a signal. Partially.

Here is part of my serial interface:

B. Modulation Order and Code Rate DVB-S QPSK 5/6

J. Profile Name EUMETCast DVB-S

So the transport layer is still not locked.
I don't know exactly what signal am I actually receiving. It doesn't seem to correspond to either transponder C4 or C10, basic service nor HVS, based on the MODCOD.
Thus I guess the ISI and RX Transport Filter Table I set up for EUMETCast is not corresponding to what I receive.

Would you have an idea of what this signal is or how could I find out with those information?

Greetings,
Quentin
======================================

Quentin.

It looks like you have the wrong profile as EUMETCast is now DVB-S2.

J. Profile Name EUMETCast DVB-S.

Perhaps this is confirmed by:

B. Modulation Order and Code Rate DVB-S QPSK 5/6

as EUMETCast Basic Service is on transponder 1 with MODCOD: 8PSK3/5

https://www.eumetsat.int/website/home/Data/DataDelivery/EUMETCast/ReceptionStationSetup/index.html
=> EUMETCast Europe

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


David J Taylor GM8ARV 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 🇪🇺
 

RX1: Active, Locked
EUMETCast DVB-S 1376.000 MHz, DVB-S QPSK 5/6, 29.896 Msps, CCM, 11.5 dB
[]
=====================================

.. and for the Basic Service the frequency should be 1513 MHz.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SR1c Serial No. 104670 30AAC Run Time: 296:35:36
SW Ver 1.05b264 V HW Ver 2.05 FW Ver 2.02b022 V BL Ver 1.01b14

RX1: Active, Locked
EUMETCast DVB-S2 1513.000 MHz, DVB-S2 8PSK 3/5, 32.993 Msps, ACM, 12.2 dB
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


Quentin P.A. Leroy
 

David,

Indeed, this is what leads me to believe I'm not receiving either transponder C4 or C10, nor basic service nor HVS.

Whenever I try the 1513.000MHz frequency with DVB-S2 standard, ACM or VCM mode, leaving the rest auto, the signal doesn't lock at all.

That's why I tried the 1376.000 MHz, that I found in a configuration file from a eumetsat repository: ftp://ftp.eumetsat.int/pub/OPS/out/user/EUMETCast_Support/EUMETCast_Licence_cd/Windows/DVB_devices/SR1/SR1_Configuration_Files/
This config file was rather minimal in explanations, it only mentioned "EUMETCast DVB-S" for this setting.
It is the way I interpreted your first advice, this look to me like another "channel" I manage lock on, which could be a good first step to understand if the antenna is correctly aligned.

I think that if I could found out what am I listening to at this frequency, it would be a helpful information.

Quentin


geojohnt@...
 

Quentin,

I think you may be pointing at the wrong satellite.

I've just found this on EUMETSAT's website:


D17) How to identify the satellite or transponder on DVB-S2 Ku band
SYMPTOMS
DVB-S2 parameters are correct, there is signal, but no lock and no data.
PROBLEM
Antenna may be pointed to the incorrect satellite and the another transponder is received.
How can I identify the correct transponder is selected?
The following transponders in the vicinity of E10A are locked with a green LED by the SR1 DVB-S2 receiver or may be indicated with a high signal level by other receivers:
16°E   11262 MHz   27.5 MSymbol/s   QPSK 2/3
13°E   11258 MHz   27.5 MSymbol/s   8PSK 3/4
10°E   11262 MHz   33.0 MSymbol/s   8PSK 3/5, 16APSK 2/3 (EUMETCast)
07°E   11262 MHz   30.0 MSymbol/s   8PSK 3/4
Any these transponders can be received at the EUMETCast downlink frequency of 11262.5 MHz, depending on the antenna pointing.
SOLUTION
If the 16 °E or 13 °E position is identified, point the antenna slightly more West.
If the 07 °E position is identified, point the antenna slightly more East.
Move the antenna in very small steps and observe the reception status until the 10 °E position is reached.
++++++++++
I hope the above might be useful.
One trick that Arne van Belle uses and I find is a help, is solar crossing of the dish.
Twice a year of course the sun 'crosses' directly behind the satellite and causes interference for several days - 'solar outage.'
The sun also 'crosses' the dish every day and what Arne suggests is attaching a piece of string from the 'centre' top of the LNB to the top rim of the dish again centrally - if you see what I mean.
Then you find out the time of the solar crossing of the dish for 10 A from your location.
You can do this from David T's WXtrack > View > Solar Outage > Solar Crossing. 
At the solar crossing time at your location for 10 A the shadow of the string should be right down the centre of your dish.

So that might be a useful task?
Regards,
John



._,_


Quentin P.A. Leroy
 

John,

What you are saying makes a lot of sense, and this trick sounds genius.
I will explore those possibilities and I'll come back to tell about the results.

I'll just need a bit of sun at the right moment, which will require some good finger crossing here in the Netherlands.

Anyway, thank you so much for those advises! It is very helpful! =D

Greetings,
Quentin


Ernst Lobsiger
 

On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 06:31 AM, Quentin P.A. Leroy wrote:
I'll just need a bit of sun at the right moment, which will require some good finger crossing here in the Netherlands.
Quentin

There is a dish pointing guide by EUMETSAT here:

ftp://ftp.eumetsat.int/pub/OPS/out/user/EUMETCast_Support/EUMETCast_Licence_cd/Generic_Documentation/EUMETCast,%20Satellite%20Antenna%20Pointing%20Guide_v1.pdf

Using the sun is a good practice. But it includes a couple of things (including having *EXACT* maybe even UTC time).

1) You must know exactly azimuth and elevation of EUTELSAT 10E as seen from your location. (use the dishpointer site).
2) Find out the time the sun crosses this azimuth the day you make your pointing (for elevation use the mechanical scale).
3) As John said: Span a black plastic tape from the top of your dish to thr LNB (a string might not give enough shadow).
4) At the very time the sun crosses your azimuth the shadow of the tape must be exactly in the center line of the dish.
You will not have too much time as the sun is moving fast: 15° per hour makes 4 minutes for 1°, you will have 1 minute!

There is an alterative for overcast sky:

1) If you know exactly the azimuth go to Google Earth at your antenna location (go close, the screen should show about 5km south).
2) Draw a line with this azimuth from your antenna position in the direction of the satellite (you can do that with your browser).
3) This line will cross buildings or other points on the ground that you can identify from the antenna position (1-2km distance)
4) Make a screen copy and/or printout that you can take with you for identification of the points as viewed from the antenna.
5) Put some exact construction of a 90° angle across your dish and aim with your bare eye at the side to the identified point

Good Luck
Ernst

..


Ernst Lobsiger
 

Quentin

I just found out that

https://www.dishpointer.com/

now combines everything for my alternate method. No Google Earth needed anymore ...

Ernst


geojohnt@...
 

Ernst,

Thanks for the EUMETSAT pointing article link.
I thought I'd seen something like this some time ago but didn't realise it was PDF document.

Regards,
John 


-----Original Message-----
From: Ernst Lobsiger via groups.io <ernst.lobsiger@...>
To: MSG-1@groups.io
Sent: Fri, 28 Aug 2020 15:38
Subject: Re: [MSG-1] EUTMETCast DVB-S2 Unable to lock

On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 06:31 AM, Quentin P.A. Leroy wrote:
I'll just need a bit of sun at the right moment, which will require some good finger crossing here in the Netherlands.
Quentin

There is a dish pointing guide by EUMETSAT here:

ftp://ftp.eumetsat.int/pub/OPS/out/user/EUMETCast_Support/EUMETCast_Licence_cd/Generic_Documentation/EUMETCast,%20Satellite%20Antenna%20Pointing%20Guide_v1.pdf

Using the sun is a good practice. But it includes a couple of things (including having *EXACT* maybe even UTC time).

1) You must know exactly azimuth and elevation of EUTELSAT 10E as seen from your location. (use the dishpointer site).
2) Find out the time the sun crosses this azimuth the day you make your pointing (for elevation use the mechanical scale).
3) As John said: Span a black plastic tape from the top of your dish to thr LNB (a string might not give enough shadow).
4) At the very time the sun crosses your azimuth the shadow of the tape must be exactly in the center line of the dish.
You will not have too much time as the sun is moving fast: 15° per hour makes 4 minutes for 1°, you will have 1 minute!

There is an alterative for overcast sky:

1) If you know exactly the azimuth go to Google Earth at your antenna location (go close, the screen should show about 5km south).
2) Draw a line with this azimuth from your antenna position in the direction of the satellite (you can do that with your browser).
3) This line will cross buildings or other points on the ground that you can identify from the antenna position (1-2km distance)
4) Make a screen copy and/or printout that you can take with you for identification of the points as viewed from the antenna.
5) Put some exact construction of a 90° angle across your dish and aim with your bare eye at the side to the identified point

Good Luck
Ernst

..


Ernst Lobsiger
 

Quentin

From simple math:

>       1. Tuner Frequency        1376.000 MHz
>       3. Standard                     DVB-S
>       F. LNB power                  18V   ------>  Polarisation H
>       H. 22 KHz                        On    ------>  High BAND, LO is at 10600 MHz

Frequency of the Transponder is 10600 + 1376 = 11976 MHz     (you have an additional offset of app. 1MHz)

https://www.lyngsat.com/Hotbird-13B.html

Above link shows you are watching TV on "Sky Italia" 11977 MHz 
DVB-S 29900-5/6                as the SR1 shows.

> RX1: Active, Locked
> EUMETCast DVB-S 1376.000 MHz, DVB-S QPSK 5/6, 29.896 Msps, CCM, 11.5 dB


You are on Hotbird 13°E, even with a 90cm dish you cannot lock transponders on Eutelsat 10E. Just my 2 cents.


Cheers
Ernst







This settin means that
      


J.W. Davies
 

Another alternative for overcast skies is to use online dish pointing calculators such as:-

https://www.dishpointer.com/

or

https://www.satsig.net/maps/satellite-tv-dish-pointing-uk-ireland.htm (UK and Ireland only).


A quick Google search will find others.


The advantage of these websites is that they draw the line on a Google Earth map for you so you can see which local features you need to point the dish at, to accurately set it in azimuth.

You don't need to know the azimuth only the satellite that you want to receive.


Regards

James





On 28/08/20 20:11, geojohnt via groups.io wrote:
Ernst,

Thanks for the EUMETSAT pointing article link.
I thought I'd seen something like this some time ago but didn't realise it was PDF document.

Regards,
John 


-----Original Message-----
From: Ernst Lobsiger via groups.io <ernst.lobsiger@...>
To: MSG-1@groups.io
Sent: Fri, 28 Aug 2020 15:38
Subject: Re: [MSG-1] EUTMETCast DVB-S2 Unable to lock

On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 06:31 AM, Quentin P.A. Leroy wrote:
I'll just need a bit of sun at the right moment, which will require some good finger crossing here in the Netherlands.
Quentin

There is a dish pointing guide by EUMETSAT here:

ftp://ftp.eumetsat.int/pub/OPS/out/user/EUMETCast_Support/EUMETCast_Licence_cd/Generic_Documentation/EUMETCast,%20Satellite%20Antenna%20Pointing%20Guide_v1.pdf

Using the sun is a good practice. But it includes a couple of things (including having *EXACT* maybe even UTC time).

1) You must know exactly azimuth and elevation of EUTELSAT 10E as seen from your location. (use the dishpointer site).
2) Find out the time the sun crosses this azimuth the day you make your pointing (for elevation use the mechanical scale).
3) As John said: Span a black plastic tape from the top of your dish to thr LNB (a string might not give enough shadow).
4) At the very time the sun crosses your azimuth the shadow of the tape must be exactly in the center line of the dish.
You will not have too much time as the sun is moving fast: 15° per hour makes 4 minutes for 1°, you will have 1 minute!

There is an alterative for overcast sky:

1) If you know exactly the azimuth go to Google Earth at your antenna location (go close, the screen should show about 5km south).
2) Draw a line with this azimuth from your antenna position in the direction of the satellite (you can do that with your browser).
3) This line will cross buildings or other points on the ground that you can identify from the antenna position (1-2km distance)
4) Make a screen copy and/or printout that you can take with you for identification of the points as viewed from the antenna.
5) Put some exact construction of a 90° angle across your dish and aim with your bare eye at the side to the identified point

Good Luck
Ernst

..


Ernst Lobsiger
 


> Another alternative for overcast skies is to use online dish pointing calculators such as:


@James

Yes dishpointer is the preferred site for aligning azimuth with landmarks. Beware of messing with compass an magnetic stuff.

@Quentin

If you want to try the solar trick and do not have software to determine the exact solar position with time you can do this:

1) Go to dishpointer to get the azimuth (NOT the magnetic one).
2) Go to the NOAA solar position calculator. You will have to enter the time a couple of times to approximate your azimuth as close as possible
(there used to be a site of a french guy that did it all automagically and gave the time for azimuth. Does anybody have the URL? Is it still online?)

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/grad/solcalc/

3) Set your clock exactly, go to the dish, put the tape on, and wait for the sun ...

Regards
Ernst


geojohnt@...
 

Quentin and Ernst,

Quentin, it seems you do not have David T's WXsat programme which would give you the solar crossing time for your location?
No matter, dish pointer is very useful as you can click and drag the dish pointer to the exact location of your dish and get its accurate location parameters and the satellite's parameters from your location.

Oh, and beware, this programme shows LNB skew looking from behind the dish - not 'from the place where you would be standing to adjust the skew!'

You could then use  https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/ with these parameters (and/or Ernst's suggestion) to see the time when the sun crosses your dish.
As Ernst says, you need to be quick and accurate.

Ernst, one thing I find 'annoying' is that the SR1 uses the downconverted (LNB) frequency in setting up not the (as with satellite TV receivers) the 'satellite's transmitted frequency.

I wonder if this is also so with the TBS (and other) receivers?

It's just seems to be another complication (for me) to be overcome.

Regards,
John.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

-----Original Message-----
From: Ernst Lobsiger via groups.io <ernst.lobsiger@...>
To: MSG-1@groups.io
Sent: Sat, 29 Aug 2020 10:02
Subject: Re: [MSG-1] EUTMETCast DVB-S2 Unable to lock


> Another alternative for overcast skies is to use online dish pointing calculators such as:

@James

Yes dishpointer is the preferred site for aligning azimuth with landmarks. Beware of messing with compass an magnetic stuff.

@Quentin

If you want to try the solar trick and do not have software to determine the exact solar position with time you can do this:

1) Go to dishpointer to get the azimuth (NOT the magnetic one).
2) Go to the NOAA solar position calculator. You will have to enter the time a couple of times to approximate your azimuth as close as possible
(there used to be a site of a french guy that did it all automagically and gave the time for azimuth. Does anybody have the URL? Is it still online?)

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/grad/solcalc/

3) Set your clock exactly, go to the dish, put the tape on, and wait for the sun ...

Regards
Ernst

++++++++++++++++++++++


Ernst Lobsiger
 

On Sat, Aug 29, 2020 at 03:08 AM, <geojohnt@...> wrote:
Ernst, one thing I find 'annoying' is that the SR1 uses the downconverted (LNB) frequency in setting up not the (as with satellite TV receivers) the 'satellite's transmitted frequency.
 
I wonder if this is also so with the TBS (and other) receivers?
John

The SR1 approach might be more universal. Think of L-Band LNBs for EUMETCast Africa with different LO Frequencies.
But of course you basically have to know how an Universal LNB works, what 13 / 18 Volt and 0 / 22 KHz signal changes.

Here is a GNU/Linux tuning file I copied from an archived version of a site I had pre 2014:

eurobird9-int:11977:h:0:27500::::
atlanticbird3:3732:h:0:11963::::
nss806:3803:h:0:27500::::
Eutelsat  9A TP 66 61.3Mbps-8PSK-TV:12034:vC34S1M5O20:0:27500:::
Eutelsat  9A TP 68 59.9Mbps-8PSK-TV+IP:12073:vC34S1M5O20:0:27500:::
Eutelsat  9A TP 69 61.3Mbps-8PSK-TV:12092:hC34S1M5O20:0:27500:::
Eutelsat 10A TP C1 49.6Mbps-QPSK-TV+IP:11221:vC56S1M2O20:0:30000:::
Eutelsat 10A TP C9 72.7Mbps-8PSK-TV:11387:vC56S1M5O20:0:30000:::
Eutelsat 10A TPC11 74.3Mbps-8PSK-TV:11428:vC56S1M5O20:0:30000:::

Yes, it directly uses the transponder frequencies. Not sure the rest looks more comprehensive to you though :-).

The first line shows that the profile Quentin can lock is meant for the old pre 2014 EUMETCast DVB-S on Eurobird 9°.
It seems this is still around on EUMETSAT's ftp site. Now in 2020 it accidentally fits to "Sky Italia" TV on Hotbird 13°E
(I checked the other transponders on LyngSat and FlySat of all satellites near Eutelsat 10A. It must be Hotbird 13°E).

Regards
Ernst