Re: today's imagery


Robert Moore
 

The following is a comment on today's Channel clouds by my TORRO colleague Nigel Bolton:

'This cloud formation is the product of a convergence line that frequently develops across Channel waters during cold northeasterly airflows. As the land is colder than the sea, a land breeze develops, so the wind blows offshore, in this case from both northern France and southern England. Where these winds meet, there is convergence and a line of cloud develops.

A similar effect occurs over SW England in the summer during southwesterly airflows. This time the land is warmer than the sea, so sea breezes develop and a line of cloud stretches northeast across Cornwall, Devon and Somerset and sometimes beyond.

This effect was partially responsible for the Boscastle flooding on the 16th August last year.'


Robert


--On 23 January 2005 14:37 +0000 Robert Moore <rsmoore@liverpool.ac.uk> wrote:

This is not of any great importance, but I hope of some interest. If you
run an HRV false colour animation for the UK today you will see (at
least) two bits of interesting cloud imagery: (1) over Scotland, high
thin cloud is racing southwards over much lower static cloud (which has a
wave structure). (2) In the English Channel after clouds pass through the
Straits of Dover they can be seen forming a long thin line just off the
French coast - with the UK coast clear.
I think I have seen this latter phenomenon discussed previously in
meteorological circles, but I forget the details. It is an example of
something or other!

Robert


------------------------
Robert Moore


44 (0) 1352 714456


Professor Robert Moore
Department of Sociology,Social
Policy and Social Work Studies
University of Liverpool
L69 7BZ

44 (0) 1352 714456

Join MSG-1@groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.