Topics

sticky Midi File Production?


Deat
 

I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


Geoffrey Carter
 

I use Anvil studio together with Timbres of Heaven Soundfonts load via Coolsoft Virtual Midi Synth. (All free). I upgraded Anvil Studio 10 years ago for $99.90 which allows me to print sheet music from MIDIs and other useful additions. I have a Yamaha synthesizer but I prefer to program using my PC using copy notes and paste rather than the keyboard option.

Geoff







On ‎Monday‎, ‎2‎ ‎November‎ ‎2020‎ ‎08‎:‎24‎:‎35‎ ‎+07, Deat <dvjduck@...> wrote:


I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


accordianman53
 

I use cubase or band in a box, depending in what I need... Is there a way that I could load Timbres of Heaven into my Vienna Soundfont? That seems to be a program by Creative Labs Audigy. Cheers!



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Geoffrey Carter via groups.io" <geoffcarter2004@...>
Date: 11/1/20 19:41 (GMT-06:00)
To: MIDKAR@groups.io
Subject: Re: [MIDKAR] Midi File Production?

I use Anvil studio together with Timbres of Heaven Soundfonts load via Coolsoft Virtual Midi Synth. (All free). I upgraded Anvil Studio 10 years ago for $99.90 which allows me to print sheet music from MIDIs and other useful additions. I have a Yamaha synthesizer but I prefer to program using my PC using copy notes and paste rather than the keyboard option.

Geoff







On ‎Monday‎, ‎2‎ ‎November‎ ‎2020‎ ‎08‎:‎24‎:‎35‎ ‎+07, Deat <dvjduck@...> wrote:


I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


brownlaw24
 

I don't sequence so the only way I have is to enter music in the excellent Mozart Music Software program (so much cheaper than Sybelius and with comprehensive features) and the use the "export to midi" feature.
Cedric



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Deat <dvjduck@...>
Date: 02/11/2020 01:24 (GMT+00:00)
To: MIDKAR@groups.io
Subject: [MIDKAR] Midi File Production?

I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


Roly Wright
 

H,
I use MusicTime deLuxe, together with Spider Pro Player with Timbres of Heaven. . This seems to do all I want except MusicTime has a current problem with the reverb function which is not working. Interested to hear if anyone else uses this program?
Cheers
Roly Wright

On Tue, Nov 3, 2020 at 10:34 AM brownlaw24 <brownlaw24@...> wrote:
I don't sequence so the only way I have is to enter music in the excellent Mozart Music Software program (so much cheaper than Sybelius and with comprehensive features) and the use the "export to midi" feature.
Cedric



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Deat <dvjduck@...>
Date: 02/11/2020 01:24 (GMT+00:00)
Subject: [MIDKAR] Midi File Production?

I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


Clifton Davis
 

I usually start with either Ludwig, Band in a Box - sometimes just to record the timing I want, but it can do a lot of interesting things if you abuse it - or my own composition aid software that produces coma separated values which are converted by a utility to a midi. On rare occasions I will start with Rapid Composer or just writing an ABC file I covert to midi. Then, however created, I take the midi and switch to Real Band where I do most of my editing. Though I will go back and forth with my software for special things and sometimes NTONYX stylizer or Onyx Arranger.  I use sounds from Timbers of Heaven for quick and dirty and usually stop there, but augment it with Bandstand and pick and choose from various Garritan packages when I'm serious.


On Sun, Nov 1, 2020, 7:24 PM Deat <dvjduck@...> wrote:
I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


Andy Allinger
 

Interesting. What is the input to your composition aid software?

I usually start with either Ludwig, Band in a Box - sometimes just to
record the timing I want, but it can do a lot of interesting things if you
abuse it - or my own composition aid software that produces coma separated
values which are converted by a utility to a midi. On rare occasions I
will
start with Rapid Composer or just writing an ABC file I covert to midi.
Then, however created, I take the midi and switch to Real Band where I do
most of my editing. Though I will go back and forth with my software for
special things and sometimes NTONYX stylizer or Onyx Arranger. I use
sounds from Timbers of Heaven for quick and dirty and usually stop there,
but augment it with Bandstand and pick and choose from various Garritan
packages when I'm serious.

On Sun, Nov 1, 2020, 7:24 PM Deat <dvjduck@hotmail.com> wrote:

I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.
Just
wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods. I
usually
start with PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a
desktop
computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature. Once
I
set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB
cable
) to enter the data. Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.
The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also. I have
some
software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the
playback
sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally, I start with a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG
Music
software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within
BIAB).
I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is. Usually, the
BIAB
renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made
quite
musical.
With all that said, the operative word is "usual". I experiment with
other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield
the
most usable and enjoyable results.
Thanks,
Deat







Clifton Davis
 

Aside from the mapping of patterns to chords and keys, it does optimization.  For a lot of musical "tasks" - for the lack of a better term - you are trying to meet various goals at the same time, be it in fitting chords to a melody, writing counterpoint, fitting a melody to a chord pattern with mostly steps but some leaps, etc.  The input is how much you value a particular piece of a goal in context. And you can adjust it based on what you hear. The underlying tool is a mathematical process called dynamic programming which you can Google. The basic idea is that if you are trying to build a path out of parts with different costs it's easy to extend a path optimally if all your subproblems are already solved.

I'm toying with the idea of doing a series of YouTube videos offering chunks of the software in web pages with embedded JavaScript.  But of course that competes with everything else.

That's the main piece of software. There is one to estimate grove from one midi and then apply it to another.  I'm not always happy with the results though and it needs more work. There is one to break a midi channel up into the minimal number of parts so that each part will have no overlapping notes. This is useful to me as Garritan doesn't handle expression on a note by note basis. None of these programs is very user friendly or very efficient at the moment.

I'd like to write one that uses pitch bend to implement dynamic tuning that preserves just temperament locally. But of course I'm not going to live long enough to do all the things I want to do on account of the list keeps growing. Actually, I'd like to do a YouTube series on music generally. I maintain that a great deal about music can be explained by appealing to five principles.

1. Hearing is logarithmic.
2. Sound production is multiplicative.
3. The human mind likes patterns.
4. The human mind likes traditions.
5. The human mind is easily bored.


On Fri, Nov 6, 2020, 7:53 PM Andy Allinger <andy@...> wrote:
Interesting.  What is the input to your composition aid software?

> I usually start with either Ludwig, Band in a Box - sometimes just to
> record the timing I want, but it can do a lot of interesting things if you
> abuse it - or my own composition aid software that produces coma separated
> values which are converted by a utility to a midi. On rare occasions I
> will
> start with Rapid Composer or just writing an ABC file I covert to midi.
> Then, however created, I take the midi and switch to Real Band where I do
> most of my editing. Though I will go back and forth with my software for
> special things and sometimes NTONYX stylizer or Onyx Arranger.  I use
> sounds from Timbers of Heaven for quick and dirty and usually stop there,
> but augment it with Bandstand and pick and choose from various Garritan
> packages when I'm serious.
>
> On Sun, Nov 1, 2020, 7:24 PM Deat <dvjduck@...> wrote:
>
>> I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.
>> Just
>> wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I
>> usually
>> start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a
>> desktop
>> computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once
>> I
>> set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB
>> cable
>> ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.
>>  The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have
>> some
>> software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the
>> playback
>> sound source (latency is almost nil).
>> Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG
>> Music
>> software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within
>> BIAB).
>> I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the
>> BIAB
>> renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made
>> quite
>> musical.
>> With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with
>> other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield
>> the
>> most usable and enjoyable results.
>> Thanks,
>> Deat
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>








DF Tweedie
 

Some great stuff here! If this were a proper forum, I'd say it's 'sticky' time.

It is dangerous to jump in on a thread you haven't read from start to finish ... as you may just be repeating something. But in the time of Covid, what's a little danger?

Anyway, what I'd like to point out is that I like an entirely different way of working. I don't want to meander from program to program massaging my MIDI composition as it is being readied to be translated to audio in yet another program. Instead I like to use a traditional DAW, Pro Tools and Cubase in my instance, and populate it with MIDI VSTis that can accomplish basic musical tasks such as progressions, melodies, harmonies, etc. That is why I am eager to hear whether BIAB 'plugin' really works, as last I investigated there were major glitches. Cubase is especially useful in this regard as it natively contains the most robust set of MIDI features (including MPE MIDI 2.0 recording and playback) of any DAW.

Anyway, while I have multiple well regard MIDI programs including full versions of RapidComposer, Ludwig, BIAB, etc., I find myself opening 'MIDI Tools' in my DAW instead.

Ones I've found particularly useful include Melodya (from RapidComposer, Scaler, Phrase Box from Vendome and Instachord and MIDIQ from W.A. Productions. In aggregate I've found that these MIDI plugins cover pretty much everything I've ever tried to do within a MIDI program with much less fuss and additionally are immediately used within the context of any sounds I'd like to try with my soft synths/ samplers.

Here's a neat video for MIDIQ demonstrating the idea. 


There is also the benefit of being able to render them on a track by track basis immediately to audio for processing/ mixing while retaining the underlying MIDI for later revision all tidily within one place and file.

In the spirit of FWIW, this is my current take on MIDI composition.

DF Tweedie


On Sat, Nov 7, 2020 at 1:16 AM Clifton Davis <clifdavis@...> wrote:
Aside from the mapping of patterns to chords and keys, it does optimization.  For a lot of musical "tasks" - for the lack of a better term - you are trying to meet various goals at the same time, be it in fitting chords to a melody, writing counterpoint, fitting a melody to a chord pattern with mostly steps but some leaps, etc.  The input is how much you value a particular piece of a goal in context. And you can adjust it based on what you hear. The underlying tool is a mathematical process called dynamic programming which you can Google. The basic idea is that if you are trying to build a path out of parts with different costs it's easy to extend a path optimally if all your subproblems are already solved.

I'm toying with the idea of doing a series of YouTube videos offering chunks of the software in web pages with embedded JavaScript.  But of course that competes with everything else.

That's the main piece of software. There is one to estimate grove from one midi and then apply it to another.  I'm not always happy with the results though and it needs more work. There is one to break a midi channel up into the minimal number of parts so that each part will have no overlapping notes. This is useful to me as Garritan doesn't handle expression on a note by note basis. None of these programs is very user friendly or very efficient at the moment.

I'd like to write one that uses pitch bend to implement dynamic tuning that preserves just temperament locally. But of course I'm not going to live long enough to do all the things I want to do on account of the list keeps growing. Actually, I'd like to do a YouTube series on music generally. I maintain that a great deal about music can be explained by appealing to five principles.

1. Hearing is logarithmic.
2. Sound production is multiplicative.
3. The human mind likes patterns.
4. The human mind likes traditions.
5. The human mind is easily bored.


On Fri, Nov 6, 2020, 7:53 PM Andy Allinger <andy@...> wrote:
Interesting.  What is the input to your composition aid software?

> I usually start with either Ludwig, Band in a Box - sometimes just to
> record the timing I want, but it can do a lot of interesting things if you
> abuse it - or my own composition aid software that produces coma separated
> values which are converted by a utility to a midi. On rare occasions I
> will
> start with Rapid Composer or just writing an ABC file I covert to midi.
> Then, however created, I take the midi and switch to Real Band where I do
> most of my editing. Though I will go back and forth with my software for
> special things and sometimes NTONYX stylizer or Onyx Arranger.  I use
> sounds from Timbers of Heaven for quick and dirty and usually stop there,
> but augment it with Bandstand and pick and choose from various Garritan
> packages when I'm serious.
>
> On Sun, Nov 1, 2020, 7:24 PM Deat <dvjduck@...> wrote:
>
>> I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.
>> Just
>> wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I
>> usually
>> start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a
>> desktop
>> computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once
>> I
>> set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB
>> cable
>> ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.
>>  The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have
>> some
>> software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the
>> playback
>> sound source (latency is almost nil).
>> Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG
>> Music
>> software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within
>> BIAB).
>> I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the
>> BIAB
>> renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made
>> quite
>> musical.
>> With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with
>> other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield
>> the
>> most usable and enjoyable results.
>> Thanks,
>> Deat
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>








JohnG
 

Just to be perfectly clear, MPE (MIDI polyphonic expression) is NOT MIDI 2.0. It is a way of implementing polyphonic expressiveness in MIDI 1.0.
It's just a way of assigning a controller to an individaul note by moving each successive note to a different MIDI channel.
In other words, it's a cludge and can potentially use up rather a lot of channels.

John Sankey, in his realisations of the Scarlatti sonatas tuned to non E.T. (equal temperament), used this mechanism (albeit in a primitive form) to apply alternate note tunings by using 12 channels, one for each note, and the appropriate pitch bend for each note. He did this more than twenty years ago. Nothing new under the sun, eh?

Cubase is not yet MIDI 2.0 capable, neither is any DAW currently on the market (8th Nov, '20).
Don't expect to see any MIDI 2.0 capable products until '21, maybe even '22.

JohnG.
(admin of MIDI-tutor)


DF Tweedie
 

@JohnG

Thank you for the correction and clarification. It is great to have such knowledgeable people on this list!

Well, two posts on the new forum and two 'faux pas.' I must be doing something right?

I'll still posit that Cubase has the best MIDI implementation ... even including the 'kludgey' ones few others have  ... of any full-featured DAW. It will also probably be one of the first with MIDI 2.0 implementation.

DF


On Sun, Nov 8, 2020 at 4:01 AM JohnG via groups.io <garsidejl=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Just to be perfectly clear, MPE (MIDI polyphonic expression) is NOT MIDI 2.0. It is a way of implementing polyphonic expressiveness in MIDI 1.0.
It's just a way of assigning a controller to an individaul note by moving each successive note to a different MIDI channel.
In other words, it's a cludge and can potentially use up rather a lot of channels.

John Sankey, in his realisations of the Scarlatti sonatas tuned to non E.T. (equal temperament), used this mechanism (albeit in a primitive form) to apply alternate note tunings by using 12 channels, one for each note, and the appropriate pitch bend for each note. He did this more than twenty years ago. Nothing new under the sun, eh?

Cubase is not yet MIDI 2.0 capable, neither is any DAW currently on the market (8th Nov, '20).
Don't expect to see any MIDI 2.0 capable products until '21, maybe even '22.

JohnG.
(admin of MIDI-tutor)


Wayne (Reed) Knazek
 

John, it's great to see you, as always! Great post!

DF, this is a great thread! Thanks for posting!!!

You know what they say . . . If you never do anything wrong . . .
you're not doing anything! LOL

Blues, Latin Rock, 60's R&B, Rock-a-Billy, SURF, Good ol' Rock-n-Roll! Midi/Sequencers and Performers Group: https://groups.io/g/IGotDaBlues
8,000 Midi Files! Backing Trax and Timbres Of Heaven soundfonts! https://groups.io/g/MIDKAR
Learn to play guitar, blues harp or ANY instrument at amazing speed!  "I Just Wanna Play The Darned Thing!"
and "Learn To Shred" Text & audio newsletter! (Training & learning tips) Plus midi & MP3 jam tracks!


JohnG
 

Hey DF, keep the posts coming.
What my father taught me, oh so many years ago, is that if you don't make mistakes you don't learn anything.
The key thing is never to make the same mistake.

And anyway, it wasn't a mistake, it was a misunderstanding and I'd hate anybody to count how many of those I've had in the last seventy something years!
And ... the way MIDI 2 is being promoted sometimes leaves a little to be desired.( N.B. not always by any means.)
I had a similar misunderstanding a week or so back, having incorrectly interpreted the MIDI 2.0 C.I. message structure. :-(  Whoops!
(I'm supposed to know this stuff being a mod. over at the MMA forum.)

Thanks Wayne for the welcome.
You've probably noticed that I haven't posted in a while!

And, to get back on topic, I'm still using good old XGworks (v.4) for simple note entry, Finale for the more complex orchestral stuff.
I've managed to get SOL2 working on my PC which gives me an XG playback mechanism.
Rendering is usually done in Cakewalk by BandLab.

Back to the notes.

JohnG.


drjames
 

I'm using Cakewalk Vs 3.2 and have done so since 1997.
I use simple templates and have an external Yamaha XG sound card connected to a Bose sound system.
I was classically trained in music and all these twanging guitars sound horrible to me.
Still entertaining on my keyboards, mainly coffee mornings and tea parties for all the old folks - like me!
James :-)

On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 1:24 AM Deat <dvjduck@...> wrote:
I know there are many ways to generate/program musical midi files.   Just wondering if any of you folks would care to share your methods.   I usually start with  PowerTracks Pro Audio (PG Music software) running on a desktop computer. It comes with Real Tracks but I don't use that feature.  Once I set up the tracks I use one of my Yamaha keyboards (connected via USB cable ) to enter the data.   Most of the time I simply play it in real-time.   The PTPA software offers several other entry methods also.   I have some software synths but prefer to let the Yamaha keyboard serve as the playback sound source (latency is almost nil).
Occasionally,  I start with  a " Band In A Box" arrangement (also PG Music software) and render it to a midi file (one mouse click from within BIAB).  I then load it into PTPA and customize it or use as is.  Usually,  the BIAB renditions are a bit robotic and repetitious but can easily be made quite musical.   
With all that said,  the operative word is "usual".  I experiment with other software and hardware but the method I've outlined seems to yield the most usable and enjoyable results. 
Thanks,
Deat


--
James Pitt-Payne


Wayne (Reed) Knazek
 

RE: The key thing is never to make the same mistake.

I think it's OK to make the same mistake . . . as long as you make
it a different way!  Trying different solutions to resolve a problem.

All part of learning.  : )

Blues, Latin Rock, 60's R&B, Rock-a-Billy, SURF, Good ol' Rock-n-Roll! Midi/Sequencers and Performers Group: https://groups.io/g/IGotDaBlues
8,000 Midi Files! Backing Trax and Timbres Of Heaven soundfonts! https://groups.io/g/MIDKAR
Learn to play guitar, blues harp or ANY instrument at amazing speed!  "I Just Wanna Play The Darned Thing!"
and "Learn To Shred" Text & audio newsletter! (Training & learning tips) Plus midi & MP3 jam tracks!


On Monday, November 9, 2020, 10:43:56 AM EST, JohnG via groups.io <garsidejl@...> wrote:


Hey DF, keep the posts coming.
What my father taught me, oh so many years ago, is that if you don't make mistakes you don't learn anything.
The key thing is never to make the same mistake.

And anyway, it wasn't a mistake, it was a misunderstanding and I'd hate anybody to count how many of those I've had in the last seventy something years!
And ... the way MIDI 2 is being promoted sometimes leaves a little to be desired.( N.B. not always by any means.)
I had a similar misunderstanding a week or so back, having incorrectly interpreted the MIDI 2.0 C.I. message structure. :-(  Whoops!
(I'm supposed to know this stuff being a mod. over at the MMA forum.)

Thanks Wayne for the welcome.
You've probably noticed that I haven't posted in a while!

And, to get back on topic, I'm still using good old XGworks (v.4) for simple note entry, Finale for the more complex orchestral stuff.
I've managed to get SOL2 working on my PC which gives me an XG playback mechanism.
Rendering is usually done in Cakewalk by BandLab.

Back to the notes.

JohnG.