Topics

It's all about remembering - Special THANKS!


Wayne (Reed) Knazek
 
Edited

When we listen to a midi our members post to the group, one of the great things that happens is . . .

We remember! We remember the song, sure. But that often triggers other memories. Here's one
of my memories . . .

Way back in 1975, my then girlfriend was a noted Choreographer in central/northern Ohio. I was a
young guy just starting my career as a manufacturing Engineer. Also a performing musician, I was
introduced to theater through Paulette's professional involvement. That was my main introduction to
Jazz. Although I was also more than familiar because of my parents' music choices. My dad was
Spike Jones' guitarist back in the 40's, and my mom danced with the Dorsey Brothers. So both
Country and Big Band music was often played in our home. Plus, my mom liked soft Rock, especially
the Beach Boys.

In '75 she was hired to choreograph the Phantom of the Opera play for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts.
They had a need for a stage engineer. Needed someone to design a real opera box that could seat 2 adults,
that would be free standing, up about 8 feet in the air, BUT there was nothing to attach it to! The box would
be on the outside of the stage curtains, with the curtain "appearing" to be the back wall of the opera box.
They needed a super structure that could support the 8' x 8' box, that would not be seen by the audience.

It had to safely support the 2 adults sitting in it, as well as allow a 3rd person to swing down from the theater's
real catwalk and for a short time, stand on the top of the box's frame. And it had to be safe, and NOT TIP OVER! LOL

AND . . . they had a $200 budget to get it done. I took the challenge. It was an awesome opera box!

In '76 she was hired again to choreograph a 3 act musical, again for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts . . .
Anything Goes!  This time they needed me to design a gang plank that looked like a real one. Needed
to be strong enough for people to really walk up it, so it looked like they were boarding a ship! And, if
you're familiar with the play, there's a guy who almost misses his trip because he almost missed getting
on the gang plank before it was totally pulled up. While the plank is rising, (meaning while "I" pulled it up)
he would run, and make a jump for it, and land on the plank. Then "run onto the ship", behind the curtain.
The gang plank was 16 feet long in total! Made of plywood and 2x4's. About 180 pounds!

The play ran 2 weeks, and on the last night of the show, for reasons I don't recall, I was running late. I got
there, ran in the back stage door, made my way to the back of the gang plank just as 2 crew members
grabbed the 2 ropes and realized they could not budge the heavy plank. They jumped out of the way
and I pulled it up, right on queue!

All of these memories came back to me. And what's even more remarkable is the timing!

That young choreographer . . . has been my wife for the past 44 years . . . as of TODAY!

One song, You're The Top . . . one little midi file posted by one of our most active, long
time members . . . brought back so many memories! On our anniversary!

James and Gary post to the group on a regular basis. We have a few other very active members
who post often! I just want to say . . .

James, thanks for this special anniversary gift, and for the MANY gifts you've contributed
to our great group!

And Gary, week after week for SO many years you've posted 1, 2 sometimes 3 or more
great midis in your Guess This Song game! Plus you've posted so many midis over the years!

Geoff, Graham, Ed, Sergio, thank you for contributing so much to our group!

I know there were others who have contributed. I thank you all!

Thank you, my friends, for so many memories!

Wayne

PS: There are SO many things I remember about just the 6 months I worked with the theater group.
I only mentioned a few above because I didn't think I should write a BOOK! LOL  Paulette worked on
several other plays during this time as well. But I gotta tell you about 2 "special moments".

During Anything Goes, there's a scene where Bugsy is in his cabin and opens a port hole, looks out
and says something like "Looks like a storm's blowing in.". That port hole (or bull's eye) was on the
back wall of his "cabin", so he was looking directly to the back stage.

Every night it became a "thang" that who ever was not "working" at the moment would gather back stage
and someone would pull a prank on Bugsy. (The actor was a GREAT guy! We all loved working with him!)

Sometimes it would be just a bunch of us making faces to try to get him to break character and laugh. I actually
mooned him once! HA! And sometimes we'd squirt water at his face.  Last night of the show, just as he
mentions the storm brewing, we pitched a bucket of water at him! Soaked his head, and his cigarette turned
to mush! 

One other scene . . . Bugsy tosses his lit cigarette into a fake smokestack. When he does, there's a bang, and a puff
of smoke comes out of the barrel. It startles Bugsy and he makes a face, then looks around to make sure no one saw
him throw the cigarette into the stack.

Again, the last night . . . long story how and why, but that night instead one 1 person putting ONE charge into the stack
(set off by a stage crew member behind the scene) . . .  THREE charges were placed in the stack! Now the stack opening
was over his head. Barely!  But enough to be safe'ish! LOL  When the charge went off, there was a huge KABOOM! And
a thick plume of smoke that puffed out across most of the stage!  

Once Bugsy regained his composure, he just looked at the audience (who were roaring with laughter!) and simply . . .
shrugged his shoulders . . . and walked away, ending the scene as usual, like nothing happened!

You can't make this stuff up! LOL


Ed Bettega
 

Thanks for sharing those stories Wayne. Having done quite a few musicals in the pit bands I’m always a bit envious of the cast and crew who got to share experiences such as those you have related. In the pit it’s all go go go or wait for the next cue, often with no idea what’s happening on stage. I bet your dad had some good stories about Spike Jones. I’ve been watching some footage on Youtube and they were pretty crazy. Especially the dwarf in the double bass gag.

Ed

On 28 Nov 2020, at 7:39 am, Wayne (Reed) Knazek via groups.io <thenettrainer@...> wrote:

When we listen to a midi our members post to the group, one of the great things that happens is . . .

We remember! We remember the song, sure. But that often triggers other memories. Here's one
of my memories . . .

Way back in 1975, my then girlfriend was a noted Choreographer in central/northern Ohio. I was a
young guy just starting my career as a manufacturing Engineer. Also a performing musician, I was
introduced to theater through Paulette's professional involvement. That was my main introduction to
Jazz. Although I was also more than familiar because of my parents' music choices. My dad was
Spike Jones' guitarist back in the 40's, and my mom danced with the Dorsey Brothers. So both
Country and Big Band music was often played in our home. Plus, my mom liked soft Rock, especially
the Beach Boys.

In '75 she was hired to choreograph the Phantom of the Opera play for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts.
They had a need for a stage engineer. Needed someone to design a real opera box that could seat 2 adults,
that would be free standing, up about 8 feet in the air, BUT there was nothing to attach it to! The box would
be on the outside of the stage curtains, with the curtain "appearing" to be the back wall of the opera box.
They needed a super structure that could support the 8" x 8" box, that would not be seen by the audience.

It had to safely support the 2 adults sitting in it, as well as allow a 3rd person to swing down from the theater's
real catwalk and for a short time, stand on the top of the box's frame. And it had to be safe, and NOT TIP OVER! LOL

AND . . . they had a $200 budget to get it done. I took the challenge. It was an awesome opera box!

In '76 she was hired again to choreograph a 3 act musical, again for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts . . .
Anything Goes!  This time they needed me to design a gang plank that looked like a real one. Needed
to be strong enough for people to really walk up it, so it looked like they were boarding a ship! And, if
you're familiar with the play, there's a guy who almost misses his trip because he almost missed getting
on the gang plank before it was totally pulled up. While the plank is rising, (meaning while "I" pulled it up)
he would run, and make a jump for it, and land on the plank. Then "run onto the ship", behind the curtain.
The gang plank was 16 feet long in total! Made of plywood and 2x4's. About 180 pounds!

The play ran 2 weeks, and on the last night of the show, for reasons I don't recall, I was running late. I got
there, ran in the back stage door, made my way to the back of the gang plank just as 2 crew members
grabbed the 2 ropes and realized they could not budge the heavy plank. They jumped out of the way
and I pulled it up, right on queue!

All of these memories came back to me. And what's even more remarkable is the timing!

That young choreographer . . . has been my wife for the past 44 years . . . as of TODAY!

One song, You're The Top . . . one little midi file posted by one of our most active, long
time members . . . brought back so many memories! On our anniversary!

James and Gary post to the group on a regular basis. We have a few other very active members
who post often! I just want to say . . .

James, thanks for this special anniversary gift, and for the MANY gifts you're contributed
to our great group!

And Gary, week after week for SO many years you've posted 1, 2 sometimes 3 or more
great midis in your Guess This Song game! Plus you've posted so many midis over the years!

Geoff, Graham, Ed, Sergio, thank you for contributing so much to our group!

I know there were others who have contributed. I thank you all!

Thank you, my friends, for so many memories!

Wayne

PS: There are SO many things I remember about just the 6 months I worked with the theater group.
I only mentioned a few above because I didn't think I should write a BOOK! LOL  Paulette worked on
several other plays during this time as well. But I gotta tell you about 2 "special moments".

During Anything Goes, there's a scene where Bugsy is in his cabin and opens a port hole, looks out
and says something like "Looks like a storm's blowing in.". That port hole (or bull's eye) was on the
back wall of his "cabin", so he was looking directly to the back stage.

Every night it became a "thang" that who ever was not "working" at the moment would gather back stage
and someone would pull a prank on Bugsy. (The actor was a GREAT guy! We all loved working with him!)

Sometimes it would be just a bunch of us making faces to try to get him to break character and laugh. I actually
mooned him once! HA! And sometimes we'd squirt water at his face.  Last night of the show, just as he
mentions the storm brewing, we pitched a bucket of water at him! Soaked his head, and his cigarette turned
to mush! 

One other scene . . . Bugsy tosses his lit cigarette into a fake smokestack. When he does, there's a bang, and a puff
of smoke comes out of the barrel. It startles Bugsy and he makes a face, then looks around to make sure no one saw
him throw the cigarette into the stack.

Again, the last night . . . long story how and why, but that night instead one 1 person putting ONE charge into the stack
(set off by a stage crew member behind the scene) . . .  THREE charges were placed in the stack! Now the stack opening
was over his head. Barely!  But enough to be safe'ish! LOL  When the charge went off, there was a huge KABOOM! And
a thick plume of smoke that puffed out across most of the stage!  

Once Bugsy regained his composure, he just looked at the audience (who were roaring with laughter!) and simply . . .
shrugged his shoulders . . . and walked away, ending the scene as usual, like nothing happened!

You can't make this stuff up! LOL


dragonsnfrogs at bctonline.com
 

This was fun reading. Thank you for sharing!

Karen K


From: "Ed Bettega" <edbettega1@...>
To: "MIDKAR" <MIDKAR@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 27, 2020 4:25:34 PM
Subject: ADV: Re: [MIDKAR] It's all about remembering - Special THANKS!

Thanks for sharing those stories Wayne. Having done quite a few musicals in the pit bands I’m always a bit envious of the cast and crew who got to share experiences such as those you have related. In the pit it’s all go go go or wait for the next cue, often with no idea what’s happening on stage. I bet your dad had some good stories about Spike Jones. I’ve been watching some footage on Youtube and they were pretty crazy. Especially the dwarf in the double bass gag.

Ed

On 28 Nov 2020, at 7:39 am, Wayne (Reed) Knazek via groups.io <thenettrainer@...> wrote:

When we listen to a midi our members post to the group, one of the great things that happens is . . .

We remember! We remember the song, sure. But that often triggers other memories. Here's one
of my memories . . .

Way back in 1975, my then girlfriend was a noted Choreographer in central/northern Ohio. I was a
young guy just starting my career as a manufacturing Engineer. Also a performing musician, I was
introduced to theater through Paulette's professional involvement. That was my main introduction to
Jazz. Although I was also more than familiar because of my parents' music choices. My dad was
Spike Jones' guitarist back in the 40's, and my mom danced with the Dorsey Brothers. So both
Country and Big Band music was often played in our home. Plus, my mom liked soft Rock, especially
the Beach Boys.

In '75 she was hired to choreograph the Phantom of the Opera play for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts.
They had a need for a stage engineer. Needed someone to design a real opera box that could seat 2 adults,
that would be free standing, up about 8 feet in the air, BUT there was nothing to attach it to! The box would
be on the outside of the stage curtains, with the curtain "appearing" to be the back wall of the opera box.
They needed a super structure that could support the 8" x 8" box, that would not be seen by the audience.

It had to safely support the 2 adults sitting in it, as well as allow a 3rd person to swing down from the theater's
real catwalk and for a short time, stand on the top of the box's frame. And it had to be safe, and NOT TIP OVER! LOL

AND . . . they had a $200 budget to get it done. I took the challenge. It was an awesome opera box!

In '76 she was hired again to choreograph a 3 act musical, again for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts . . .
Anything Goes!  This time they needed me to design a gang plank that looked like a real one. Needed
to be strong enough for people to really walk up it, so it looked like they were boarding a ship! And, if
you're familiar with the play, there's a guy who almost misses his trip because he almost missed getting
on the gang plank before it was totally pulled up. While the plank is rising, (meaning while "I" pulled it up)
he would run, and make a jump for it, and land on the plank. Then "run onto the ship", behind the curtain.
The gang plank was 16 feet long in total! Made of plywood and 2x4's. About 180 pounds!

The play ran 2 weeks, and on the last night of the show, for reasons I don't recall, I was running late. I got
there, ran in the back stage door, made my way to the back of the gang plank just as 2 crew members
grabbed the 2 ropes and realized they could not budge the heavy plank. They jumped out of the way
and I pulled it up, right on queue!

All of these memories came back to me. And what's even more remarkable is the timing!

That young choreographer . . . has been my wife for the past 44 years . . . as of TODAY!

One song, You're The Top . . . one little midi file posted by one of our most active, long
time members . . . brought back so many memories! On our anniversary!

James and Gary post to the group on a regular basis. We have a few other very active members
who post often! I just want to say . . .

James, thanks for this special anniversary gift, and for the MANY gifts you're contributed
to our great group!

And Gary, week after week for SO many years you've posted 1, 2 sometimes 3 or more
great midis in your Guess This Song game! Plus you've posted so many midis over the years!

Geoff, Graham, Ed, Sergio, thank you for contributing so much to our group!

I know there were others who have contributed. I thank you all!

Thank you, my friends, for so many memories!

Wayne

PS: There are SO many things I remember about just the 6 months I worked with the theater group.
I only mentioned a few above because I didn't think I should write a BOOK! LOL  Paulette worked on
several other plays during this time as well. But I gotta tell you about 2 "special moments".

During Anything Goes, there's a scene where Bugsy is in his cabin and opens a port hole, looks out
and says something like "Looks like a storm's blowing in.". That port hole (or bull's eye) was on the
back wall of his "cabin", so he was looking directly to the back stage.

Every night it became a "thang" that who ever was not "working" at the moment would gather back stage
and someone would pull a prank on Bugsy. (The actor was a GREAT guy! We all loved working with him!)

Sometimes it would be just a bunch of us making faces to try to get him to break character and laugh. I actually
mooned him once! HA! And sometimes we'd squirt water at his face.  Last night of the show, just as he
mentions the storm brewing, we pitched a bucket of water at him! Soaked his head, and his cigarette turned
to mush! 

One other scene . . . Bugsy tosses his lit cigarette into a fake smokestack. When he does, there's a bang, and a puff
of smoke comes out of the barrel. It startles Bugsy and he makes a face, then looks around to make sure no one saw
him throw the cigarette into the stack.

Again, the last night . . . long story how and why, but that night instead one 1 person putting ONE charge into the stack
(set off by a stage crew member behind the scene) . . .  THREE charges were placed in the stack! Now the stack opening
was over his head. Barely!  But enough to be safe'ish! LOL  When the charge went off, there was a huge KABOOM! And
a thick plume of smoke that puffed out across most of the stage!  

Once Bugsy regained his composure, he just looked at the audience (who were roaring with laughter!) and simply . . .
shrugged his shoulders . . . and walked away, ending the scene as usual, like nothing happened!

You can't make this stuff up! LOL



drjames
 

Wayne,
What a great posting. Thanks for the memories!
all the best
James Pitt-Payne :-)


Hayward Martin
 

Wayne...  Thanks for the great post!


From: MIDKAR@groups.io <MIDKAR@groups.io> on behalf of Wayne (Reed) Knazek via groups.io <thenettrainer@...>
Sent: Friday, November 27, 2020 6:39:56 PM
To: MIDKAR@groups.io <MIDKAR@groups.io>
Subject: [MIDKAR] It's all about remembering - Special THANKS!
 
When we listen to a midi our members post to the group, one of the great things that happens is . . .

We remember! We remember the song, sure. But that often triggers other memories. Here's one
of my memories . . .

Way back in 1975, my then girlfriend was a noted Choreographer in central/northern Ohio. I was a
young guy just starting my career as a manufacturing Engineer. Also a performing musician, I was
introduced to theater through Paulette's professional involvement. That was my main introduction to
Jazz. Although I was also more than familiar because of my parents' music choices. My dad was
Spike Jones' guitarist back in the 40's, and my mom danced with the Dorsey Brothers. So both
Country and Big Band music was often played in our home. Plus, my mom liked soft Rock, especially
the Beach Boys.

In '75 she was hired to choreograph the Phantom of the Opera play for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts.
They had a need for a stage engineer. Needed someone to design a real opera box that could seat 2 adults,
that would be free standing, up about 8 feet in the air, BUT there was nothing to attach it to! The box would
be on the outside of the stage curtains, with the curtain "appearing" to be the back wall of the opera box.
They needed a super structure that could support the 8" x 8" box, that would not be seen by the audience.

It had to safely support the 2 adults sitting in it, as well as allow a 3rd person to swing down from the theater's
real catwalk and for a short time, stand on the top of the box's frame. And it had to be safe, and NOT TIP OVER! LOL

AND . . . they had a $200 budget to get it done. I took the challenge. It was an awesome opera box!

In '76 she was hired again to choreograph a 3 act musical, again for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts . . .
Anything Goes!  This time they needed me to design a gang plank that looked like a real one. Needed
to be strong enough for people to really walk up it, so it looked like they were boarding a ship! And, if
you're familiar with the play, there's a guy who almost misses his trip because he almost missed getting
on the gang plank before it was totally pulled up. While the plank is rising, (meaning while "I" pulled it up)
he would run, and make a jump for it, and land on the plank. Then "run onto the ship", behind the curtain.
The gang plank was 16 feet long in total! Made of plywood and 2x4's. About 180 pounds!

The play ran 2 weeks, and on the last night of the show, for reasons I don't recall, I was running late. I got
there, ran in the back stage door, made my way to the back of the gang plank just as 2 crew members
grabbed the 2 ropes and realized they could not budge the heavy plank. They jumped out of the way
and I pulled it up, right on queue!

All of these memories came back to me. And what's even more remarkable is the timing!

That young choreographer . . . has been my wife for the past 44 years . . . as of TODAY!

One song, You're The Top . . . one little midi file posted by one of our most active, long
time members . . . brought back so many memories! On our anniversary!

James and Gary post to the group on a regular basis. We have a few other very active members
who post often! I just want to say . . .

James, thanks for this special anniversary gift, and for the MANY gifts you're contributed
to our great group!

And Gary, week after week for SO many years you've posted 1, 2 sometimes 3 or more
great midis in your Guess This Song game! Plus you've posted so many midis over the years!

Geoff, Graham, Ed, Sergio, thank you for contributing so much to our group!

I know there were others who have contributed. I thank you all!

Thank you, my friends, for so many memories!

Wayne

PS: There are SO many things I remember about just the 6 months I worked with the theater group.
I only mentioned a few above because I didn't think I should write a BOOK! LOL  Paulette worked on
several other plays during this time as well. But I gotta tell you about 2 "special moments".

During Anything Goes, there's a scene where Bugsy is in his cabin and opens a port hole, looks out
and says something like "Looks like a storm's blowing in.". That port hole (or bull's eye) was on the
back wall of his "cabin", so he was looking directly to the back stage.

Every night it became a "thang" that who ever was not "working" at the moment would gather back stage
and someone would pull a prank on Bugsy. (The actor was a GREAT guy! We all loved working with him!)

Sometimes it would be just a bunch of us making faces to try to get him to break character and laugh. I actually
mooned him once! HA! And sometimes we'd squirt water at his face.  Last night of the show, just as he
mentions the storm brewing, we pitched a bucket of water at him! Soaked his head, and his cigarette turned
to mush! 

One other scene . . . Bugsy tosses his lit cigarette into a fake smokestack. When he does, there's a bang, and a puff
of smoke comes out of the barrel. It startles Bugsy and he makes a face, then looks around to make sure no one saw
him throw the cigarette into the stack.

Again, the last night . . . long story how and why, but that night instead one 1 person putting ONE charge into the stack
(set off by a stage crew member behind the scene) . . .  THREE charges were placed in the stack! Now the stack opening
was over his head. Barely!  But enough to be safe'ish! LOL  When the charge went off, there was a huge KABOOM! And
a thick plume of smoke that puffed out across most of the stage!  

Once Bugsy regained his composure, he just looked at the audience (who were roaring with laughter!) and simply . . .
shrugged his shoulders . . . and walked away, ending the scene as usual, like nothing happened!

You can't make this stuff up! LOL


Dick and Jane Schmitt
 

Maybe MIDKAR needs an oral history site for this kind of delicious stuff!  Studs Terkel, eat your heart out (maybe Heart and Soul for us Loesser folks.)



On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 5:39 PM Wayne (Reed) Knazek via groups.io <thenettrainer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
When we listen to a midi our members post to the group, one of the great things that happens is . . .

We remember! We remember the song, sure. But that often triggers other memories. Here's one
of my memories . . .

Way back in 1975, my then girlfriend was a noted Choreographer in central/northern Ohio. I was a
young guy just starting my career as a manufacturing Engineer. Also a performing musician, I was
introduced to theater through Paulette's professional involvement. That was my main introduction to
Jazz. Although I was also more than familiar because of my parents' music choices. My dad was
Spike Jones' guitarist back in the 40's, and my mom danced with the Dorsey Brothers. So both
Country and Big Band music was often played in our home. Plus, my mom liked soft Rock, especially
the Beach Boys.

In '75 she was hired to choreograph the Phantom of the Opera play for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts.
They had a need for a stage engineer. Needed someone to design a real opera box that could seat 2 adults,
that would be free standing, up about 8 feet in the air, BUT there was nothing to attach it to! The box would
be on the outside of the stage curtains, with the curtain "appearing" to be the back wall of the opera box.
They needed a super structure that could support the 8" x 8" box, that would not be seen by the audience.

It had to safely support the 2 adults sitting in it, as well as allow a 3rd person to swing down from the theater's
real catwalk and for a short time, stand on the top of the box's frame. And it had to be safe, and NOT TIP OVER! LOL

AND . . . they had a $200 budget to get it done. I took the challenge. It was an awesome opera box!

In '76 she was hired again to choreograph a 3 act musical, again for the Willoughby School of Fine Arts . . .
Anything Goes!  This time they needed me to design a gang plank that looked like a real one. Needed
to be strong enough for people to really walk up it, so it looked like they were boarding a ship! And, if
you're familiar with the play, there's a guy who almost misses his trip because he almost missed getting
on the gang plank before it was totally pulled up. While the plank is rising, (meaning while "I" pulled it up)
he would run, and make a jump for it, and land on the plank. Then "run onto the ship", behind the curtain.
The gang plank was 16 feet long in total! Made of plywood and 2x4's. About 180 pounds!

The play ran 2 weeks, and on the last night of the show, for reasons I don't recall, I was running late. I got
there, ran in the back stage door, made my way to the back of the gang plank just as 2 crew members
grabbed the 2 ropes and realized they could not budge the heavy plank. They jumped out of the way
and I pulled it up, right on queue!

All of these memories came back to me. And what's even more remarkable is the timing!

That young choreographer . . . has been my wife for the past 44 years . . . as of TODAY!

One song, You're The Top . . . one little midi file posted by one of our most active, long
time members . . . brought back so many memories! On our anniversary!

James and Gary post to the group on a regular basis. We have a few other very active members
who post often! I just want to say . . .

James, thanks for this special anniversary gift, and for the MANY gifts you're contributed
to our great group!

And Gary, week after week for SO many years you've posted 1, 2 sometimes 3 or more
great midis in your Guess This Song game! Plus you've posted so many midis over the years!

Geoff, Graham, Ed, Sergio, thank you for contributing so much to our group!

I know there were others who have contributed. I thank you all!

Thank you, my friends, for so many memories!

Wayne

PS: There are SO many things I remember about just the 6 months I worked with the theater group.
I only mentioned a few above because I didn't think I should write a BOOK! LOL  Paulette worked on
several other plays during this time as well. But I gotta tell you about 2 "special moments".

During Anything Goes, there's a scene where Bugsy is in his cabin and opens a port hole, looks out
and says something like "Looks like a storm's blowing in.". That port hole (or bull's eye) was on the
back wall of his "cabin", so he was looking directly to the back stage.

Every night it became a "thang" that who ever was not "working" at the moment would gather back stage
and someone would pull a prank on Bugsy. (The actor was a GREAT guy! We all loved working with him!)

Sometimes it would be just a bunch of us making faces to try to get him to break character and laugh. I actually
mooned him once! HA! And sometimes we'd squirt water at his face.  Last night of the show, just as he
mentions the storm brewing, we pitched a bucket of water at him! Soaked his head, and his cigarette turned
to mush! 

One other scene . . . Bugsy tosses his lit cigarette into a fake smokestack. When he does, there's a bang, and a puff
of smoke comes out of the barrel. It startles Bugsy and he makes a face, then looks around to make sure no one saw
him throw the cigarette into the stack.

Again, the last night . . . long story how and why, but that night instead one 1 person putting ONE charge into the stack
(set off by a stage crew member behind the scene) . . .  THREE charges were placed in the stack! Now the stack opening
was over his head. Barely!  But enough to be safe'ish! LOL  When the charge went off, there was a huge KABOOM! And
a thick plume of smoke that puffed out across most of the stage!  

Once Bugsy regained his composure, he just looked at the audience (who were roaring with laughter!) and simply . . .
shrugged his shoulders . . . and walked away, ending the scene as usual, like nothing happened!

You can't make this stuff up! LOL


Wayne (Reed) Knazek
 

Dick, Jane, cool reply to the "memories" post! Thanks.

Hmmmm . . . . A lot of our members are Boomers.
We have a lot of "history" we can share.  I know
a couple of our members who could share VOLUMES!
I've been a performing musician since the mid 60's. So
you KNOW I have stuff to share! (Or maybe not share! LOL)

Many members are younger. Some might not relate to 
our stories. But perhaps many would be interested to
hear some of our stories, shenanigans, anecdotes etc.
from the past.

I think if we all just posted these stories to out main
group, maybe some members would be turned off a
bit. Maybe too many long posts not really midi related.

Should we start a MidKar Remembers group, and then
add links from the MidKar.com site? Maybe even add
Memories to our MidKar site?

Maybe just start a Memories group, not necessarily a MidKar
group. And invite those who join Memories to join Midkar?

I'm going to start a new thread: "MidKar Memories Ideas"

Let's keep our replies for the Memory group/site separate
from this thread.

Input, ideas and comments welcome!!!  Wayne

On Sunday, November 29, 2020, 07:25:19 PM EST, Dick and Jane Schmitt <schmitt.dick@...> wrote:


Maybe MIDKAR needs an oral history site for this kind of delicious stuff!
Studs Terkel, eat your heart out (maybe Heart and Soul for us Loesser folks.)