Topics

NSW wharves 1892

Petan
 

The 1892 NSW government wharves list uses the left and right side of river terminology. Cudgen wharf is shown as right bank and Tweed Heads left bank. That only matches if heading downstream. Any folk here know if that downstream terminology assumption is correct?  

 

My topic is wharf tramways on the Tweed including the ones fed by sugar tramways, either permanent or temporary paddock lines.

 

I have the 1892 Wharf list, as it was, from the PWD annual report, at my google drive site https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwYUFmUkRiNnp6Q00/view   

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

John Dennis
 

You are correct. Left and Right according to the direction the water flows, downstream.

John

On 30 August 2017 at 11:36, 'Peter Cokley' yahoomail@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

The 1892 NSW government wharves list uses the left and right side of river terminology. Cudgen wharf is shown as right bank and Tweed Heads left bank. That only matches if heading downstream. Any folk here know if that downstream terminology assumption is correct?  

 

My topic is wharf tramways on the Tweed including the ones fed by sugar tramways, either permanent or temporary paddock lines.

 

I have the 1892 Wharf list, as it was, from the PWD annual report, at my google drive site https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwYUFmUkRiNnp6Q00/view   

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley


Eddie Oliver
 

On 30.08.2017 11:36, 'Peter Cokley' yahoomail@... [LRRSA] wrote:
The 1892 NSW government wharves list uses the left and right side of
river terminology. Cudgen wharf is shown as right bank and Tweed Heads
left bank. That only matches if heading downstream. Any folk here know
if that downstream terminology assumption is correct?
That is certainly standard usage and has presumably not changed over the years. Google
left bank right definition downstream
to get numerous references.

Kevin Sewell
 

Who knows what logic they used in 1892, but that regime is contrary to the current "rules of the road" for channel markers whereby a starboard marker is to be passed to the starboard side when proceeding UPstream, not down. It is entirely possible that the reverse terminology/regime was applied to wharves but thats not logical or consistent. Possible but not logical. 

On Wed, Aug 30, 2017 at 11:36 AM, 'Peter Cokley' yahoomail@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

The 1892 NSW government wharves list uses the left and right side of river terminology. Cudgen wharf is shown as right bank and Tweed Heads left bank. That only matches if heading downstream. Any folk here know if that downstream terminology assumption is correct?  

 

My topic is wharf tramways on the Tweed including the ones fed by sugar tramways, either permanent or temporary paddock lines.

 

I have the 1892 Wharf list, as it was, from the PWD annual report, at my google drive site https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwYUFmUkRiNnp6Q00/view   

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley




--
Cheers,
Kevin

Blowing out someone else's candle does not make your's burn any brighter.

rthorne475
 

Yes, the 'Left Bank' in Paris, for example.



From: "eoliver@... [LRRSA]"
To: LRRSA@...
Sent: Wednesday, 30 August 2017, 5:49
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] NSW wharves 1892

 
On 30.08.2017 11:36, 'Peter Cokley' yahoomail@... [LRRSA] wrote:
> The 1892 NSW government wharves list uses the left and right side of
> river terminology. Cudgen wharf is shown as right bank and Tweed Heads
> left bank. That only matches if heading downstream. Any folk here know
> if that downstream terminology assumption is correct?
>

That is certainly standard usage and has presumably not changed over the
years. Google
left bank right definition downstream
to get numerous references.



David Halfpenny
 

On 30 Aug 2017, at 03:14, Kevin Sewell kevinrsewell@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

It is entirely possible that the reverse terminology/regime was applied to wharves but thats not logical or consistent. Possible but not logical.
Irrelevant anecdote:

At Fen Ditton in England, all water traffic is required to cross over twice in quick succession. Given that the river is sharply S shaped, this probably counts as "Logical if not Consistent”.

It sure gets a lot of non-boatmen into a lather as other craft lurch inexplicably into their path, shouting :-)

David 1/2d

Petan
 

Thanks for the great responses!!! Some of the cane lines to the wharves were **proposed** as non standard cane tramway gauges eg the PWD annual report 1894 Jan to 1895 June has a couple of three foot gauge horse drawn lines being surveyed around the Tweed. I am working on a piece for a LR's research section on these horse drawn cane lines to wharves and using CC Singleton's 1948 and John Armstrong's 1976 Bulletin articles as the foundation.

Cheers
Peter Cokley