Topics

Carnarvon


Roderick Smith
 

Roderick Smith

Escape to Carnarvon, Western Australia: The town that played a surprising role in the NASA moon landing JUL 25, 2020
Carnarvon jetty, built in the 1890s, is credited with kicking off the town’s horticultural industry, opening the town to markets down south. The One Mile Jetty once hosted thousands of visitors, including many who rode the tourist train up and down its planks. Sadly it is now in a state of disrepair and closed in 2017.
Carnarvon played an important, but little-known, role in the space race. In 1964 it was home to the largest tracking station outside mainland USA, which was key to NASA’s manned moon project. The tracking station is now decommissioned, but its critical part in the moon landing is remembered at the Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum. 
The town is also a gateway to one of the world’s largest monolith at Mount Augustus, and the Kennedy Range national park, home to the spectacular Honeycomb Gorge.
<www.domain.com.au/news/escape-to-carnarvon-western-australia-the-town-that-played-a-surprising-role-in-the-nasa-moon-landing-965274>

200727M-Fairfax-Domain-Carnarvon-d-pier-ss.jpg


B.Rumary
 

On 01/11/2020 01:24, Roderick Smith via groups.io wrote:
Carnarvon played an important, but little-known, role in the space race. In 1964 it was home to the largest tracking station outside mainland USA, which was key to NASA’s manned moon project. The tracking station is now decommissioned, but its critical part in the moon landing is remembered at the Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum. 

I think this was the Parkes Observatory radio telescope. If so it's part in the moon landing was covered in a movie called "The Dish", starring Sam Neill.

For more on this see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dish

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Stephen Cox
 

Carnarvon played an important, but little-known, role in the space race. In 1964 it was home to the largest tracking station outside mainland USA, which was key to NASA’s manned moon project. The tracking station is now decommissioned, but its critical part in the moon landing is remembered at the Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum. 

I think this was the Parkes Observatory radio telescope. If so it's part in the moon landing was covered in a movie called "The Dish", starring Sam Neill.

For more on this see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dish

 
The movie was pretty flexible with the facts as in never spoil a good story with the facts.  The Honeysuckle Creek station broadcast covered the initial transmission from the moon including the first steps onto the surface.
 
You may care to check out https://www.honeysucklecreek.net/Apollo_11/A11_Dinn.html for the movie errors written by Mike Dinn, who was the Operations Supervisor at Honeysuckle Creek at the time.
 
 
Regards,
 
Stephen Cox
Canberra AUS


denis.wasley
 

From Wikipedia

Carnarvon has had three tramways.[3]

  • The first, shown on a Public Works Department map of 1884, ran from a landing site on the river, across Olivia Terrace to a shed on the other side of the road - A very short tramway indeed. The trolley used on this tramway was supposed to be hand powered, using a lever attached to crank on two of the wheels. However, there is a reference to the use of wind-power.
  • The second tramway, constructed between 1886 and 1887, ran west from Olivia Terrace in a straight line to the jetty, which was halfway between Mangrove Point and Conspicuous Clump. It was horse drawn.
  • The third, and partially remaining, tramway was completed on 9 November 1900. It runs from the townsite, across Babbage Island to the deep-sea jetty. It was constructed with a rail gauge of 2 feet (610 mm). It was 2 miles 5 chains (3.3 km) long. Due to the heavy loads of wool being carried on what was a very light railway, it was decided to convert the tramway to 3 feet 6 inches (1,070 mm) gauge in 1908–09. This tramway was worked with a steam locomotive. The tramway ceased operation in 1965.

The Carnarvon Light Railway Association operated trains along restored tracks on the jetty; however, due to unsafe conditions the jetty is now closed to the public.

From 1964 to 1965, 12 sounding rockets were launched from Carnarvon to a maximum altitude of 120 km.[8]

During the 1960s, NASA set up a tracking station nearby to support the Gemini and Apollo space programs. The tracking station was closed in the mid-1970s. Only the foundations of the historical site remain. The site is adjacent to the OTC Satellite Earth Station Carnarvon.

 

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Cox
Sent: Tuesday, 3 November 2020 1:47 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Carnarvon

 

Carnarvon played an important, but little-known, role in the space race. In 1964 it was home to the largest tracking station outside mainland USA, which was key to NASA’s manned moon project. The tracking station is now decommissioned, but its critical part in the moon landing is remembered at the Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum. 

I think this was the Parkes Observatory radio telescope. If so it's part in the moon landing was covered in a movie called "The Dish", starring Sam Neill.

For more on this see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dish

 

The movie was pretty flexible with the facts as in never spoil a good story with the facts.  The Honeysuckle Creek station broadcast covered the initial transmission from the moon including the first steps onto the surface.

 

You may care to check out https://www.honeysucklecreek.net/Apollo_11/A11_Dinn.html for the movie errors written by Mike Dinn, who was the Operations Supervisor at Honeysuckle Creek at the time.

 

 

Regards,

 

Stephen Cox

Canberra AUS


Bob Backway
 

No, Carnarvan played a part as well. "The Dish" was fiction based on fact. Both places were used.

Bob Backway, Belgrave Hts, Victoria, Australia
Commodore, Lake Eyre Yacht Club   LakeEyreYC.com


John Dennis
 

On Tue, 3 Nov 2020, 9:44 am Bob Backway, <bob_backway@...> wrote:
No, Carnarvan played a part as well. "The Dish" was fiction based on fact. Both places were used.

Bob Backway, Belgrave Hts, Victoria, Australia
Commodore, Lake Eyre Yacht Club   LakeEyreYC.com