Ballina


Petan
 

I managed to scan the Ballina rail route maps at Murwillumbah Library recently. The Ballina end is from a 1942 map and most of the other end from a 1976 map with map names and scales on each. Some might be interested in this long closed NSWGR line. 


Ballina end (3MB) Ballina-1942-3MB.jpg

 

Booyang end (4MB)    Lismore 1976 extract.jpg  


Cheers

Peter Cokley




Bruce Wood
 

Hi Peter,
 
Thank-you for sharing your work.
 
I was keen to see the information on the former Ballina branch, however something is going wrong when I open the links. The file names suggest the files are 3MB. The files I am opening are about 107 – 133 KB. When I magnify the map, the pixelation loses all clarity.
 
Am I doing something wrong? All your previous maps, I have magnified, have all had very good definition.
 
 
Cheers
Bruce
 
 
 

Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2015 11:40 AM
Subject: [LRRSA] Ballina
 
 

I managed to scan the Ballina rail route maps at Murwillumbah Library recently. The Ballina end is from a 1942 map and most of the other end from a 1976 map with map names and scales on each. Some might be interested in this long closed NSWGR line.

 

Ballina end (3MB) Ballina-1942-3MB.jpg

 

Booyang end (4MB)    Lismore 1976 extract.jpg 

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 



Noel Reed
 

Hello all,

I have a bit of information about the Ballina branch line from my early years of working with the NSWGR S&T Branch.

 

During the WW2 years, the main northern railway had been duplicated only as far as Branxton.  About 1948/49, increasing coal traffic from mines beyond Branxton were causing congestion on the single line which carried all rail traffic to and from the north and north west.

 

An early plan for duplication towards Singleton was to lay a second track beyond Branxton with light rails because  heavier rail was difficult to obtain at the time. The intention was that the second track was to have light rails only and was to be used for coal traffic carried  in the old ten ton private hopper  wagons, hauled by 50 class locos. The intended light rail for this project was to be pre-used consequent on closure of the Ballina line.

 

A plan was prepared for the use of single line track block  (i.e. bi-directional) working on both tracks between  Branxton and  Whittingham with remotely controlled crossing loops at Belford .  A new diagram was prepared for Branxton signal box from where the twin single lines would be controlled.

 

Before this scheme could be carried out, heavier rail  became available for the extra track.  Duplication with the usual Down and Up lines was used with the loops at Belford signalled as uni-directional refuge loops.

 

Noel Reed.  Railway signal engineer since 1948.

 

PS Has research on the Ballina line produced any details of the interlocking of a lifting bridge near Ballina ?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Thursday, 1 October 2015 12:13 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Ballina

 

Hi Peter,

 

Thank-you for sharing your work.

 

I was keen to see the information on the former Ballina branch, however something is going wrong when I open the links. The file names suggest the files are 3MB. The files I am opening are about 107 – 133 KB. When I magnify the map, the pixelation loses all clarity.

 

Am I doing something wrong? All your previous maps, I have magnified, have all had very good definition.

 

 

Cheers

Bruce 

 

Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2015 11:40 AM

Subject: [LRRSA] Ballina

 

 

I managed to scan the Ballina rail route maps at Murwillumbah Library recently. The Ballina end is from a 1942 map and most of the other end from a 1976 map with map names and scales on each. Some might be interested in this long closed NSWGR line.

 

Ballina end (3MB) Ballina-1942-3MB.jpg

 

Booyang end (4MB)    Lismore 1976 extract.jpg 

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

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Chris Stratton
 

Thanks Peter.

I had a look at bridge piers remaining at Ballina early last year but would like more time to look at more of the line. I followed the line on Google satellite view and most, if not all, of the formation appears to have not been built on.

 

Regards,

CS

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Thursday, 1 October 2015 11:41 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Ballina

 




I managed to scan the Ballina rail route maps at Murwillumbah Library recently. The Ballina end is from a 1942 map and most of the other end from a 1976 map with map names and scales on each. Some might be interested in this long closed NSWGR line. 

 

Ballina end (3MB) Ballina-1942-3MB.jpg

 

Booyang end (4MB)    Lismore 1976 extract.jpg  

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

 





Eddie Oliver
 


Bruce Wood
 

It appears that the author has many other books, including: Out of Puff – The Ballina Train
 
 
Does anyone own any of these author’s books, who can provide a reference on the quality?
 
Bruce
 

Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2015 6:00 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Ballina
 
 

https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Forgotten_Railways_of_the_Northern_River.html?id=mYxiGgAACAAJ&redir_esc=y


Eddie Oliver
 

On 1/10/2015 18:49, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@... [LRRSA] wrote:
It appears that the author has many other books, including: Out of Puff – The Ballina Train
 
 
Does anyone own any of these author’s books, who can provide a reference on the quality?
 


I have checked my stacks of unread books, and confirm that I have both of them. I have moved them to the top of the highest priority stack. I therefore may be able to answer your question within about three years.

I now vaguely recall ordering them direct from the Alstonville society a few years ago.



Bruce Wood
 

Hi Eddie,
 
I will be up that way in a few weeks. Your recommendations in three weeks, rather than three years would be very helpful!
 
The books aren’t very expensive, however do they have information and photos that has previously been unpublished? Local historical societies can sometimes be a good source of material, not commonly available through normal railway groups.
 
 
Bruce
 

Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2015 7:38 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Ballina
 
 

On 1/10/2015 18:49, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@... [LRRSA] wrote:
It appears that the author has many other books, including: Out of Puff – The Ballina Train
 
 
Does anyone own any of these author’s books, who can provide a reference on the quality?
 
 

I have checked my stacks of unread books, and confirm that I have both of them. I have moved them to the top of the highest priority stack. I therefore may be able to answer your question within about three years.

I now vaguely recall ordering them direct from the Alstonville society a few years ago.



neville conder
 

Hello
My brother moved to Alstonville last year and sent me both books knowing my historical interest in railways. 'Forgotten Railways of the Northern Rivers' covers the same information as in 'Out of Puff' and the Casino-Tenterfield Line. I read them but can't remember much about the text.
Regards
Neville


On 1 Oct 2015, at 8:21 PM, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

Hi Eddie,
 
I will be up that way in a few weeks. Your recommendations in three weeks, rather than three years would be very helpful!
 
The books aren’t very expensive, however do they have information and photos that has previously been unpublished? Local historical societies can sometimes be a good source of material, not commonly available through normal railway groups.
 
 
Bruce
 
Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2015 7:38 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Ballina
 
 

On 1/10/2015 18:49, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@... [LRRSA] wrote:
It appears that the author has many other books, including: Out of Puff – The Ballina Train
 
 
Does anyone own any of these author’s books, who can provide a reference on the quality?
 
 

I have checked my stacks of unread books, and confirm that I have both of them. I have moved them to the top of the highest priority stack. I therefore may be able to answer your question within about three years.

I now vaguely recall ordering them direct from the Alstonville society a few years ago.



Eddie Oliver
 

On 2015-10-01 20:21, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@bigpond.com [LRRSA] wrote:


I will be up that way in a few weeks. Your recommendations in three
weeks, rather than three years would be very helpful!

I looked last night at the bigger book that has both Ballina and
Bonalbo, but have not actually read it. It is much more substantial than
most such documents, because it has been prepared from a broad history
viewpoint rather than just the 'rail history' (the author points out
that he is not a 'rail buff'). It does however contain most of the
information that might be expected in a rail history, although I did not
see much about operations (but timetables and suchlike are presented,
and the line did not last long enough for there to be much variation
operationally). Photos are presented typically four to a page on single
pages rather than being integrated with the text; they are fairly
plentiful except for a lack of photos of actual operations, but most are
very small (two inches by one inch or thereabouts) and therefore
challenge the viewer's ability to see detail in such sizes. All photos
are black and white, including the ones of what remains in recent times.


So I think it is a worthy production in its frame of reference, and I
look forward to actually reading it even though I suspect I may skim
over much of the 'social history'.


I still think that there was some other recent publication concentrating
on what now remains of the Ballina line. As Kevin has suggested it may
be in ARH or something similar (maybe Digest).


Bruce Wood
 

Hi Eddie,
 
Thank-you for your comments – very much appreciated.
 
It is interesting that Bonalbo features in a book with this title. I would not like to walk from Bonalbo to the closest standard gauge railway! (The drive takes long enough!)
 
It would be nice if the supporting pictures could have been larger! 
 
Thanks again
Bruce
 
 
 

Sent: Friday, October 02, 2015 9:49 AM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Ballina
 
 

On 2015-10-01 20:21, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@... [LRRSA] wrote:

> I will be up that way in a few weeks. Your recommendations in three
> weeks, rather than three years would be very helpful!

I looked last night at the bigger book that has both Ballina and
Bonalbo, but have not actually read it. It is much more substantial than
most such documents, because it has been prepared from a broad history
viewpoint rather than just the 'rail history' (the author points out
that he is not a 'rail buff'). It does however contain most of the
information that might be expected in a rail history, although I did not
see much about operations (but timetables and suchlike are presented,
and the line did not last long enough for there to be much variation
operationally). Photos are presented typically four to a page on single
pages rather than being integrated with the text; they are fairly
plentiful except for a lack of photos of actual operations, but most are
very small (two inches by one inch or thereabouts) and therefore
challenge the viewer's ability to see detail in such sizes. All photos
are black and white, including the ones of what remains in recent times.

So I think it is a worthy production in its frame of reference, and I
look forward to actually reading it even though I suspect I may skim
over much of the 'social history'.

I still think that there was some other recent publication concentrating
on what now remains of the Ballina line. As Kevin has suggested it may
be in ARH or something similar (maybe Digest).


Eddie Oliver
 

On 2015-10-02 10:12, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@bigpond.com [LRRSA] wrote:


It is interesting that Bonalbo features in a book with this title. I
would not like to walk from Bonalbo to the closest standard gauge
railway! (The drive takes long enough!)

The book is detailing the history of the plans to build the railway from
Casino to Bonalbo, including discussion and photos of the earthworks
that were actually constructed for a considerable distance (to
Mummulgum, roughly half way?)


Bruce Wood
 

Hi Eddie,
 
I understand now – thanks!
 
Bruce
 

Sent: Friday, October 02, 2015 10:40 AM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Ballina
 
 

On 2015-10-02 10:12, 'Bruce Wood' bruce.wood@... [LRRSA] wrote:

> It is interesting that Bonalbo features in a book with this title. I
> would not like to walk from Bonalbo to the closest standard gauge
> railway! (The drive takes long enough!)

The book is detailing the history of the plans to build the railway from
Casino to Bonalbo, including discussion and photos of the earthworks
that were actually constructed for a considerable distance (to
Mummulgum, roughly half way?)