[On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank


B.Rumary
 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance 
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc 
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action 
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Greg Stephenson <greg.stephenson@...>
 


G'day Frank
 
Have a look at this
 
 
It was land reclamation undertaken at Brighton in Queensland as an unemployment relief project in the 1930's.  It's pretty well where Eventide Home is now.
 
Regards
 
Greg Stephenson
Brisbane, Australia

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 8:34 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Michael C.
 

Also, mile-long embankment know as The Cob in Porthmadog, North Wales was constructed using a three foot gauge tramway and quarried rock was tipped into the sea.

See the illustration at the top of this page.

http://www.festrail.co.uk/fr_history_1.htm

Michael Chapman

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

"Brian Rumary brian@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance 
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc 
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action 
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Stephen Percy Larcombe
 

If you want details of sea walls, then Cheetham Salt at Geelong (Moolap) had a 2 foot gauge track laid along their see wall so that maintenance can be performed, there is in fact some old flat top trucks dumped off the edge to help protect the sea wall.
 
Yours
 
Stephen
 

To: LRRSA@...
From: LRRSA@...
Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2015 22:53:11 +0100
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

 
Also, mile-long embankment know as The Cob in Porthmadog, North Wales was constructed using a three foot gauge tramway and quarried rock was tipped into the sea.

See the illustration at the top of this page.

http://www.festrail.co.uk/fr_history_1.htm

Michael Chapman

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

"Brian Rumary brian@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk