Fowler indirect jackshaft drive locomotives


Michael J
 

I'm sure that everyone is aware of 2' gauge Fowler indirect jackshaft
drive locomotive in the sugar museum near Innisfail, formally in a
Melbourne scrap yard. I was under the impression that that was the
only one in Australia.

Then I was browsing "Tall Timbers and Tramways" and there was a
picture of a 3'6" gauge version that was found on a couple of
Victorian timber tramways. And then that evening reading an article by
John Dennis in the latest issue of Narrow Gauge Downunder, there were
a whole swag of 2'6" gauge versions on the Cobar mine firewood tramways.

Now of course I've got a few questions, can anybody answer?

Were these half dozen the only ones in Australia? Were they all 2-4-0T
wheel arrangement? Were they all basicly the same design, even the
same size, just different gauges, or were they all unique designs?

They are sure interesting looking locos.

Cheers,

Michael Johnson


Mark Trainbrain
 

Hi Michael,
The preserved sugar cane railway example is in fact an 0-4-2T, so we had
both 2-4-0T (Cobar et al) and 0-4-2T versions. There's a book on Hawaiian
sugar cane railways that has some great drawings of both wheel arrangements.
Hope that answers at least one of your questions!
Regards,
Mark K
Sydney Aus

-----Original Message-----
From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf
Of Michael J
Sent: Monday, 13 November 2006 10:20 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Fowler indirect jackshaft drive locomotives

I'm sure that everyone is aware of 2' gauge Fowler indirect jackshaft
drive locomotive in the sugar museum near Innisfail, formally in a
Melbourne scrap yard. I was under the impression that that was the
only one in Australia.

Then I was browsing "Tall Timbers and Tramways" and there was a
picture of a 3'6" gauge version that was found on a couple of
Victorian timber tramways. And then that evening reading an article by
John Dennis in the latest issue of Narrow Gauge Downunder, there were
a whole swag of 2'6" gauge versions on the Cobar mine firewood tramways.

Now of course I've got a few questions, can anybody answer?

Were these half dozen the only ones in Australia? Were they all 2-4-0T
wheel arrangement? Were they all basicly the same design, even the
same size, just different gauges, or were they all unique designs?

They are sure interesting looking locos.

Cheers,

Michael Johnson





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Michael J
 

Mark K wrote:


Hi Michael,
The preserved sugar cane railway example is in fact an 0-4-2T, so we had
both 2-4-0T (Cobar et al) and 0-4-2T versions. There's a book on Hawaiian
sugar cane railways that has some great drawings of both wheel arrangements.
Hope that answers at least one of your questions!
Regards,
Mark K
Sydney Aus

-

.

.
Cheers, Mark, and I took photos of that loco... Michael


John Dennis <jdennis@...>
 

Michael,

One "lesser known" bit of information about the Fowler jackshaft loco
at Mourilyan is that it operated on South Australia's Eyre Peninsula,
being utilised during the construction of the Tod River reservoir. The
loco was built for Mourilyan in 1883, left there in 1913, and worked
on the peninsula from 1919 to 1921 when it was relocated to Adelaide.
It's a well-travelled little locomotive...

John

On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 11:19:45 -0000, "Michael J"
<thirtyinchfan@pearcedale.com> wrote:

I'm sure that everyone is aware of 2' gauge Fowler indirect jackshaft
drive locomotive in the sugar museum near Innisfail, formally in a
Melbourne scrap yard. I was under the impression that that was the
only one in Australia.