Date   

Jetty railway at Broome

Hunslet
 

I will be visiting Broome for one day in early January 2017 as part of a sea cruise.

Does anyone have any current information as to any remains of the former jetty railway at this location, please?

Hunslet


Re: : Rolling Stock Allocations - Whitfield Line

David in Avenel
 

I suggest you get in touch with Geoff Tasker on tasmont@bigpond.net.au.  He is heavily involved in the PBPS Archives and might well have some information about rolling stock on the line.

--
cheers and best wishes,  
David in Avenel.au
{Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.)


Re: : Rolling Stock Allocations - Whitfield Line

Graham
 

HI David
Could you contact me with an e-mail address please
So that I can forward an e-mail I received re your request
 Many thanks
Graham


Re: : Rolling Stock Allocations - Whitfield Line

David Gawthorn
 


It is possible that the info you seek might be in the book:
http://www.sierraaustralia.com/the-narrow-gauge.html

Good luck


Email sent using Optus Webmail


Tweed sand mining

Petan
 

Something perhaps not well known, but in 1973 mineral sands was transported by standard gauge freight trains on the Murwillumbah line to the Condong Mill 1435 mm gauge branch line from Coopernook near Taree. This was processed at the nearby Kingscliff / Cudgen sand processing works of Cudgen RZ as named in the linked newspaper clipping. Picture of unloading on the Condong branch with the name and date of the newspaper. Sorry but that is all I know as I found this page in the museum as credited on the page. This could well have been only a one off trial train?  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwXzZGMmd6WkZUbVk/view   

 

More on the Cudgen Tweed mineral sands tramway and mineral sands history in The titanium Tramway at Cudgen by Jim Longworth in Light Railways 207 June 2009 published by LRRSA. The Condong mill branch closed at the end of the 1974 season as did the mill’s own 610mm gauge tramway.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley


Re: : Rolling Stock Allocations - Whitfield Line

Graham
 

Hi David and Scott
Unfortunately the Annual Reports didn't include the information you are seeking.
 The only reporting may have been in  internal correspondence. I have made a search of the
"reports to Government" and can find nothing relevant to rolling stock on Narrow gauge lines.
particularly the Wang- Whitfield.
Regards
Graham

On 6/11/2016 10:31 AM, sncs@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

Hi David, 


The weekly notices don't show rolling stock movements, they are more for infrastructure changes, including (or mainly these days) temporary speed restrictions due to deficiencies.
There are occasionally mentions of vehicles being certified for operation, but unfortunately, not the sort of information you are after.

I'm not sure where you would find that sort of info - annual reports maybe?

Regards,

Scott


Re: : Rolling Stock Allocations - Whitfield Line

sncs@...
 

Hi David, 

The weekly notices don't show rolling stock movements, they are more for infrastructure changes, including (or mainly these days) temporary speed restrictions due to deficiencies.
There are occasionally mentions of vehicles being certified for operation, but unfortunately, not the sort of information you are after.

I'm not sure where you would find that sort of info - annual reports maybe?

Regards,

Scott


Re: Follow-up to GPS article -re UAV's

David Halfpenny
 


On 5 Nov 2016, at 00:30, John Cleverdon johnc@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

Some further comments about drones.

My lady friend and I provided catering at a railway event last year. The hall was full of Blokes, apart from a tiny old lady sitting alone, oblivious of the trains.  Lady Friend, being the kindly sort who befriends lost souls, made girl-to-girl contact with a question, “Hello, what’s your hobby?”  “Oh, I’m not really bothered about trains,” said Little Old Lady, “I fly Drones.” 
(Though next time I saw her, she was driving a standard gauge diesel locomotive.)

D1/2d


Rolling Stock Allocations - Whitfield Line

David Price
 

Hi all,

I posted this query on the ausnarrowgauge modellers site a few days ago but apart from one response offering info on Walhalla I've had no responses.

There seems to be quite a bit of information available on the movement of locomotives on the VR narrow gauge (of which I have quite a bit) but I'm wondering if I can be pointed to a source that would indicate the rolling stock allocations on the Whitfield line around the 1950s?

Something like weekly notices or running sheets that might indicate what the numbers were of the NQs, NMs, NUs etc. still on the line prior to closure?

Obviously can get some numbers from photographs in various publications such as Focus on Whitfield, etc.but would like something a bit more definitive if possible.

Regards,

David Price
bellarinerailway.com.au



Re: Follow-up to GPS article -re UAV's

John Cleverdon <johnc@...>
 

Hello Iain/all,
Some further comments about drones.
Last year at work, we hired an external company to fly a drone over a couple of development projects we are involved with (Martha Cove at Safety Beach and Marriott Waters at Lyndhurst), recording some impressive MPEG4 video. This was 1280*720 resolution and 30fps. These clips aren't online but looking at them on my home or work PC's indicates pretty good quality (a 6-minute clip is nearly 600MB in size).

Developers at a couple of other projects we are involved with have also got some drone video footage of their own for the official websites; these are at:
http://myjubilee.com.au/latest-construction-video-update/ - Jubilee at Wyndham Vale
http://satterley.com.au/tarneit/ - Habitat at Tarneit

I was also at a professional conference a couple of weeks back (coincidentally with a 'heritage' theme) and one of the speakers (Anton van Wyk from Spatial Technologies - http://spatialtechnologies.com.au/) was talking about using drones and data capture at heritage sites; this included (as an example) using a drone to help create a 3D 'point cloud' model of the conference venue.
If/when this talk is put online, I'll try and remember to post the URL here.
The trade displays included some drones as well, one being a 'flying wing' design while another was a larger circular 'eight-rotor' drone.

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/
LinkedIn: http://au.linkedin.com/pub/john-cleverdon/a/a81/2b




Re: Future of YahooGroups and alternate options

David Halfpenny
 


On 4 Nov 2016, at 23:47, Kevin Sewell kevinrsewell@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:



One of the interest groups I belong to switched from Yahoo Groups to io Groups about 1 year ago in frustration at the continual problems with Yahoo Groups. The transition was seamless and very pain-free. It is a free group system just like Yahoo, and we have all been very pleased with it so far.

Groups io was created to replace Yahoo Groups by the same guy who wrote the original Groups product that Yahoo bought.

I’m an unofficial Yahoo Community activist, and Groups io is ‘our’ lifeboat-of-choice should the stricken ship finally sink.

David 1/2d


Re: Future of YahooGroups and alternate options

Kevin Sewell
 

One of the interest groups I belong to switched from Yahoo Groups to io Groups about 1 year ago in frustration at the continual problems with Yahoo Groups. The transition was seamless and very pain-free. It is a free group system just like Yahoo, and we have all been very pleased with it so far.
There is however one restriction. In the free version you are limited to (something like) 1Gb of storage. That doesn't bother us much as we don't post a large amount of photos or files - mostly just chatter - and have never come anywhere near our limit. We have a clear understanding that anything attached must be compressed and minimised, and then we all know that stuff will not be left to sit in storage for long periods of time.
It works very well, and on average there are probably 20 messages (new topics or response chatter) daily. Would recommend io Groups if the storage issue doesn't cramp your style.




On Saturday, November 5, 2016, John Cleverdon johnc@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Hello all,
On the topic of 'what will happen if/when Yahoo finishes up', my main hobby is astronomy and in the local astronomy club we've had a highly successful Yahoo group (https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/e-scorpius/info) for many years.
However, with the future of Yahoo not being certain, some members have recently set up a web-based forum using PHP (http://www.mpas.asn.au/Forum/index.php) for members. It will have a similar design to the much larger 'IceInSpace' amateur astronomy forums (http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/index.php).

The only downside with this is that so far, it seems that you actually have to login in the web browser to view the messages; you can't get them in your email inbox (at least with Thunderbird) but can only get messages when new postings are made.
There is still a learning curve with this, so we are yet to work out all of what can or can't be done with PHP.

Regards,
John

--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/
LinkedIn: http://au.linkedin.com/pub/john-cleverdon/a/a81/2b




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--
Cheers,
Kevin

Blowing out someone else's candle does not make your's burn any brighter.



Re: Future of YahooGroups and alternate options

David Halfpenny
 

I took over a Yahoo Group serving a worldwide railway association and, at the request of members, I started a php type forum in parallel with it. Yes, there was a learning curve - I had to learn HTML to customise the forum, and members had to learn to upload photos.

I myself prefer Yahoo, and some of my best members hate the php Forum but, if Yahoo dies, it’s what will take over.

The php Forum has overtaken the Yahoo Group in total membership, though not in active membership. The people who prefer it to Yahoo do so very strongly:

- While I share your dislike of having to log-in to read the messages, many people like the way you can select which Topics they get email notifications about. Indeed they like the way they can ignore things they aren’t interested in. 

- People also like the way the forums turn into a serious of ‘communal blogs’ which are very good for words-and-pictures storytelling. So somebody with a busy life can settle down at a weekend and read through a week’s worth as if it were a magazine. Unlike Yahoo, every photo is embedded in the right place within the text.

- After each Topic has quietened down a bit, I go through it editing out all the material that doesn’t contribute to the telling, such as greetings, congratulations, wrong information. This means anyone reading through it from start to finish gets a compacted consistent version/

- Since then Yahoo, in its determination to ape Facebook, has made it very hard to follow a Thread online because of the endless unpacking and scrolling needed. The old-fashioned php Forum retains Pages that are easier to scroll through.

David 1/2d 

On 4 Nov 2016, at 22:53, John Cleverdon johnc@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:



Hello all,
On the topic of 'what will happen if/when Yahoo finishes up', my main hobby is astronomy and in the local astronomy club we've had a highly successful Yahoo group (https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/e-scorpius/info) for many years.
However, with the future of Yahoo not being certain, some members have recently set up a web-based forum using PHP (http://www.mpas.asn.au/Forum/index.php) for members. It will have a similar design to the much larger 'IceInSpace' amateur astronomy forums (http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/index.php).

The only downside with this is that so far, it seems that you actually have to login in the web browser to view the messages; you can't get them in your email inbox (at least with Thunderbird) but can only get messages when new postings are made.
There is still a learning curve with this, so we are yet to work out all of what can or can't be done with PHP.

Regards,
John
-- 
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/
LinkedIn: http://au.linkedin.com/pub/john-cleverdon/a/a81/2b




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Re: Future of YahooGroups and alternate options

John Cleverdon <johnc@...>
 

Hello all,
On the topic of 'what will happen if/when Yahoo finishes up', my main hobby is astronomy and in the local astronomy club we've had a highly successful Yahoo group (https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/e-scorpius/info) for many years.
However, with the future of Yahoo not being certain, some members have recently set up a web-based forum using PHP (http://www.mpas.asn.au/Forum/index.php) for members. It will have a similar design to the much larger 'IceInSpace' amateur astronomy forums (http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/index.php).

The only downside with this is that so far, it seems that you actually have to login in the web browser to view the messages; you can't get them in your email inbox (at least with Thunderbird) but can only get messages when new postings are made.
There is still a learning curve with this, so we are yet to work out all of what can or can't be done with PHP.

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/
LinkedIn: http://au.linkedin.com/pub/john-cleverdon/a/a81/2b




Re: : German Industrial Locos in contemporary Australia (Was SMR)

Philip G Graham
 

One additional item of interest is the display of builder's numbers on O&K diesel locomotives. From the earliest production dating from the "Montania" factory, the unit's serial number was by itself on a largish oblong plate in relief bolted to the outside of the back sheet of the driver's cabin, or where a short hood was incorporated on the outer end of that. This was a tradition that was continued right up to the end of production in 1981.

Tempting targets for souvenir hunters, it is noted that unfortunately the SMR #32 is missing its outside serial number plate, probably long gone before reaching these shores. Luckily there is a comprehensive manufacturer's data plate affixed to the side of the control desk inside the driver's cabin with all the relevant information.

-PGG-


German Industrial Locos in contemporary Australia (Was SMR)

Philip G Graham
 

Not many of this category imported into Australia post WWII, but enough to create some interest.

Particularly Orenstein & Koppel, so well known up until the WWI put paid to most things German [see John Browning's excellent O&K steam loco article in the  "Light Railways" Issue 246], and then in fits and starts for non-steam mostly in surrounding territories.

However in the 1950s, and on, virtually nothing until two diminutive O&K Model Type MB7N show up in 2007 in New South Wales for a track laying contract. Details of the loco's resurfacing recently are covered now and later elsewhere in LRRSA records, but some comments on the locomotives themselves will not go astray.

The MB7N was a common type in Germany that serviced the typical smaller factory or yard that had to move a few dozen wagons each day from a mainline interchange into a close nearby factory location. About 200 or so units including the older MV6 and the modernized MB170N were built - in the range of about 120kW and 20 tonnes. With the changing nature of less-than and of wagon-load traffic, there as with elsewhere in the world, lots became available on the second-hand market and there is a reasonable dispersal around Europe, particularly with track maintenance companies, privatized there as here. In the southern hemisphere not so much, hence a degree of surprise at these on our doorstep so to speak.

Mechanically, with still common Deutz engine and Voith transmission there is still a reasonable amount of spares available even here. The actual transmission arrangement for the MB7N and family is a unique O&K design: where the axle is combined in an overall one piece inside frame assembly incorporating the sprung suspension and final drive which is supported above by the Megi rubber/metal 'sandwich' (think Metalastik) and mechanically interconnected with the adjoining axle unit, guiding and tracking rather like a bogie. The under frame side members do not have any axle box openings, only small inspection/adjustment access holes. The whole thing is reminiscent of the articulated wheel arrangements that O&K had used in their 0-8-0 and 0-10-0 plantation locos.

All of which makes for a little variety in an otherwise fairly limited Australian industrial locomotive scene.

-PGG-



Re: Antisocial media - was Re: : Re: Re:: SMR new locomotive

rthorne475
 

This is all very interesting...but I seem to have missed the vital issue: what exactly are the new SMR locos?  I'd be grateful for details and, if possible, a photo as a simple email attachment.  Anyone able to help?

Richard Horne



From: "Eddie Oliver eoliver@... [LRRSA]"
To: LRRSA@...
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2016, 12:03
Subject: Antisocial media - was Re: : Re: [LRRSA] Re:: SMR new locomotive

 
On 1/11/2016 22:49, John Dennis jdennis412@... [LRRSA] wrote:
It's not perfect, but right now here in Australia there seems to be much more information and communication on railway enthusiast matters via Facebook than any other method.

Make that misinformation and miscommunication, then the statement would be undeniable.





Re: : Re: Re:: SMR new locomotive

David Halfpenny
 


On 1 Nov 2016, at 11:49, John Dennis jdennis412@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

The search facility in Facebook Groups works pretty well, finding the search test in posts and comments.

Fair comment, John, but  - as on a great many websites - any common Keyword gets too many hits to handle.
All I mean is that a whole lot more sophisticated search is most certainly possible, and young Zuckers is rich beyond the dreams of Croesus.

You still need to join Facebook in order to contribute to groups, and indeed in many cases (most in my experience), to even read a group's posts. 

Yes, but you don’t have to reveal yourself to a wicked world.
- Don’t fill in a Profile, 
- Don’t solicit or accept any Friends,
- Lie about your age ,
- Don’t post anything to your Page, 
- Lock down your security (every time they change the settings). 

There’s also a great app / browser extension called FB Purity which blocks advertisements and customises up the screen display a treat - all under your own control.

Facebook is like BREXIT - it sucks now, but we’re going to make the best of it, come what May.

It's not perfect, but right now here in Australia there seems to be much more information and communication on railway enthusiast matters via Facebook than any other method.

Anything on Bush Trams, please?

David 1/2d


Antisocial media - was Re: : Re: Re:: SMR new locomotive

Eddie Oliver
 

On 1/11/2016 22:49, John Dennis jdennis412@... [LRRSA] wrote:
It's not perfect, but right now here in Australia there seems to be much more information and communication on railway enthusiast matters via Facebook than any other method.

Make that misinformation and miscommunication, then the statement would be undeniable.



Re: : Re: Re:: SMR new locomotive

John Dennis
 

David,

The search facility in Facebook Groups works pretty well, finding the search test in posts and comments. You still need to join Facebook in order to contribute to groups, and indeed in many cases (most in my experience), to even read a group's posts. 

However your comments about the busier the group, the harder it is to manage is perfectly correct. 

It's not perfect, but right now here in Australia there seems to be much more information and communication on railway enthusiast matters via Facebook than any other method.

John



On 1 November 2016 at 22:43, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 2)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Key messages:


- Facebook GROUPS avoid the ghastliness of Ordinary Facebook

- you don’t have to suffer Ordinary Facebook to enjoy them.

On 1 Nov 2016, at 01:58, Frank Stamford frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

The reluctance of people to join Facebook bemuses me, but there is no doubt that it is strong and widespread.

Vast numbers of people have had a variety of bad experiences, from mere self-inflicted embarrassment downwards.
- I originally joined to keep an eye on life-threatening cyber-bullying among choir-girls !
- Information Overload means that the important messages (cries for help, reminders of events etc) get drowned out by the sheer volume of drivel, trivia and worse, from a toxic mix of warring relations, ‘friends’ and organisations. Either we read the whole lot, or we depend on which messages Facebook’s computer thinks we should see - that’s the logic of the matter.
- I get a lot of real-life grief from a relentless Facebook stalker.
- I can’t say that endless kittens and pictorial platitudes, mingled with pictures of my daughters getting drunk, is my idea of entertainment, much as I love kittens.
But all that is mere Ordinary Facebook.

Facebook Groups share the same interface but are far superior, and unfairly tarred with the same brush

The display Format is the main weakness:
- every post becomes a new Thread with a string of replies and replies to replies, all truncated on the screen unless you click each one laboriously
- posts are in ever-changing order, by Last Reply, not by Creation or subject
- the need to scroll and scroll and scroll laboriously, just to get back to yesterday, let alone last week. 
The quieter the Group, the easier it is to manage. 

And as you say,

The search facilities on Facebook are not particularly good, either.

They are limited to Groups and about as adequate as CTRL+F - but Facebook has the resources to do a really good job, when it chooses.

The trick for me is to Save the best bits to my own backed-up computer, and make my own Archive leaving pleasantries to wither online.


 its use is so widespread in the community, particularly in the younger age groups, the LRRSA must increase its activity on Facebook to survive in the longer term, I think.

Hmm - my family have all shifted to WhatsApp and tell me loudly how inconvenient it is for them that I stick with boring old Facebook!

But regardless of the longer term (year after next?) we may have to survive the potential collapse of Yahoo! Groups (after Christmas?). 
As a Yahoo community activist, I’ve seen how precarious it’s been for donkey’s years, but the Verizon takeover (if it’s still on) could well be a crunch point.
If Yahoo! Groups fold there are several alternatives, of which Facebook may not the the best ship but is certainly the easiest lifeboat to jump to - apart from the reluctance of the Refuseniks.

David 1/2d


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