Date   

Re: Cossack (WA)

Hunslet
 

Just the site for the Chinese to purchase!

Hunslet.

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Friday, 5 February 2021 4:45 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

Hmm. When I was up that way five years ago I spent two or three days at Karijni, and less than 2-3 hours at Cossack. I don't think they are comparable. 

 

John

 

On Fri, 5 Feb 2021 at 14:06, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:

The photos with the article don't show any aspect of the tramway.

Roderick

WA government is selling 22-hectare ghost town in Pilbara region. LISA CALAUTTI OCT 26, 2020
The ghost town of Cossack, in the Pilbara, is being sold by the WA government. Photo: Supplied
An entire Pilbara township where Western Australia’s pearling industry originated is on the market, with the state government hoping the new owners will breathe new life into the historic ghost town.
Offered for sale for the first time, Cossack, which is about 1480 kilometres north of Perth and a half-hour drive from Karratha, was established in 1863.
The abandoned town, which is on Butchers Inlet at the mouth of the Harding River on the Pilbara Coast, was the first port to be founded in the north west of Australia.
The WA Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage has enlisted LJ Hooker Karratha and LJ Hooker Commercial Perth to conduct a registrations of interest campaign for the 22-hectare site, and they are on the hunt for proposals that will bring social and economic benefits to the state’s north west.
Anna Guillesserok, LJ Hooker Karratha sales executive, said the unique offering had so far generated a large amount of interest from overseas buyers, as well as from Perth tourism businesses.
One of the historic buildings in Cossack, in the Pilbara region of WA. Photo: Supplied
“What makes it rare is that it has so much land around it and raw, natural beauty,” she said.
“I think it’s going to be an excellent site for someone to develop as far as tourism goes. I think it rivals Karijini [National Park] for what it has to offer.”
The department, on behalf of the State of WA, is looking for interest from the private sector to create a new era for Cossack, while preserving its cultural and heritage values, and its natural and built environment. Twelve heritage-listed buildings and Jarman Island are part of the sale.
The Cossack town site precinct and the Jarman Island lighthouse and quarters are on the state register of heritage places.
The statement of significance says the precinct has several buildings constructed of local materials and archaeological sites dating from the 1870s, which have cultural heritage significance due to the fact they contain evidence of the impact of European settlement on Aboriginal communities.
The town of Cossack was one of the first in the Pilbara region, but over the years lost residents to nearby towns, such as Point Sampson and Karratha. Photo: Supplied
The precinct is also noted for the “outstanding figures in the early development of the Pilbara region, including explorer F. T. Gregory, the Padbury, Wellard, Broadhurst, Withnell and Sholl families, and Cossack identities such as the Halls and Muramats”.
During the gold rushes of the late 1880s, new immigrants arrived through Cossack, according to the heritage listing.
“At this time the settlement was linked to Roebourne with the tramway. Despite this, the town was slowly eclipsed by Point Samson, with the establishment of the jetty there,” it stated.
“In the 20th century, activities at Cossack included commerce, as seen at Muramats Store, and the turtle processing enterprise based out of the Customs Building.”
The government is looking for proposals for low-impact tourism ventures such as innovative and high-quality eco-tourism accommodation, camping, cafes and galleries, which will support the regeneration of the town’s under-utilised heritage assets, while also ensuring the long-term conservation and future management of the site.
LJ Hooker Commercial Perth director Vincent Siciliano said Cossack was a pivotal part of WA’s pearling industry.
“But Cossack sits in an amazing pocket of the Pilbara. The townsite is bordered by the azure water of the Harding River,” he said.
“This campaign presents a developer or entity with a rare chance to deliver a vision and ongoing commitment for a low-impact activation of a piece of WA’s history.”
The campaign is open until 2pm on November 20.
<www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/wa-government-is-selling-22-hectare-ghost-town-in-pilbra-region-999186>






Re: Cossack (WA)

John Dennis
 

Hmm. When I was up that way five years ago I spent two or three days at Karijni, and less than 2-3 hours at Cossack. I don't think they are comparable. 

John

On Fri, 5 Feb 2021 at 14:06, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
The photos with the article don't show any aspect of the tramway.

Roderick

WA government is selling 22-hectare ghost town in Pilbara region. LISA CALAUTTI OCT 26, 2020
The ghost town of Cossack, in the Pilbara, is being sold by the WA government. Photo: Supplied
An entire Pilbara township where Western Australia’s pearling industry originated is on the market, with the state government hoping the new owners will breathe new life into the historic ghost town.
Offered for sale for the first time, Cossack, which is about 1480 kilometres north of Perth and a half-hour drive from Karratha, was established in 1863.
The abandoned town, which is on Butchers Inlet at the mouth of the Harding River on the Pilbara Coast, was the first port to be founded in the north west of Australia.
The WA Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage has enlisted LJ Hooker Karratha and LJ Hooker Commercial Perth to conduct a registrations of interest campaign for the 22-hectare site, and they are on the hunt for proposals that will bring social and economic benefits to the state’s north west.
Anna Guillesserok, LJ Hooker Karratha sales executive, said the unique offering had so far generated a large amount of interest from overseas buyers, as well as from Perth tourism businesses.
One of the historic buildings in Cossack, in the Pilbara region of WA. Photo: Supplied
“What makes it rare is that it has so much land around it and raw, natural beauty,” she said.
“I think it’s going to be an excellent site for someone to develop as far as tourism goes. I think it rivals Karijini [National Park] for what it has to offer.”
The department, on behalf of the State of WA, is looking for interest from the private sector to create a new era for Cossack, while preserving its cultural and heritage values, and its natural and built environment. Twelve heritage-listed buildings and Jarman Island are part of the sale.
The Cossack town site precinct and the Jarman Island lighthouse and quarters are on the state register of heritage places.
The statement of significance says the precinct has several buildings constructed of local materials and archaeological sites dating from the 1870s, which have cultural heritage significance due to the fact they contain evidence of the impact of European settlement on Aboriginal communities.
The town of Cossack was one of the first in the Pilbara region, but over the years lost residents to nearby towns, such as Point Sampson and Karratha. Photo: Supplied
The precinct is also noted for the “outstanding figures in the early development of the Pilbara region, including explorer F. T. Gregory, the Padbury, Wellard, Broadhurst, Withnell and Sholl families, and Cossack identities such as the Halls and Muramats”.
During the gold rushes of the late 1880s, new immigrants arrived through Cossack, according to the heritage listing.
“At this time the settlement was linked to Roebourne with the tramway. Despite this, the town was slowly eclipsed by Point Samson, with the establishment of the jetty there,” it stated.
“In the 20th century, activities at Cossack included commerce, as seen at Muramats Store, and the turtle processing enterprise based out of the Customs Building.”
The government is looking for proposals for low-impact tourism ventures such as innovative and high-quality eco-tourism accommodation, camping, cafes and galleries, which will support the regeneration of the town’s under-utilised heritage assets, while also ensuring the long-term conservation and future management of the site.
LJ Hooker Commercial Perth director Vincent Siciliano said Cossack was a pivotal part of WA’s pearling industry.
“But Cossack sits in an amazing pocket of the Pilbara. The townsite is bordered by the azure water of the Harding River,” he said.
“This campaign presents a developer or entity with a rare chance to deliver a vision and ongoing commitment for a low-impact activation of a piece of WA’s history.”
The campaign is open until 2pm on November 20.
<www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/wa-government-is-selling-22-hectare-ghost-town-in-pilbra-region-999186>







Cossack (WA)

Roderick Smith
 

The photos with the article don't show any aspect of the tramway.

Roderick

WA government is selling 22-hectare ghost town in Pilbara region. LISA CALAUTTI OCT 26, 2020
The ghost town of Cossack, in the Pilbara, is being sold by the WA government. Photo: Supplied
An entire Pilbara township where Western Australia’s pearling industry originated is on the market, with the state government hoping the new owners will breathe new life into the historic ghost town.
Offered for sale for the first time, Cossack, which is about 1480 kilometres north of Perth and a half-hour drive from Karratha, was established in 1863.
The abandoned town, which is on Butchers Inlet at the mouth of the Harding River on the Pilbara Coast, was the first port to be founded in the north west of Australia.
The WA Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage has enlisted LJ Hooker Karratha and LJ Hooker Commercial Perth to conduct a registrations of interest campaign for the 22-hectare site, and they are on the hunt for proposals that will bring social and economic benefits to the state’s north west.
Anna Guillesserok, LJ Hooker Karratha sales executive, said the unique offering had so far generated a large amount of interest from overseas buyers, as well as from Perth tourism businesses.
One of the historic buildings in Cossack, in the Pilbara region of WA. Photo: Supplied
“What makes it rare is that it has so much land around it and raw, natural beauty,” she said.
“I think it’s going to be an excellent site for someone to develop as far as tourism goes. I think it rivals Karijini [National Park] for what it has to offer.”
The department, on behalf of the State of WA, is looking for interest from the private sector to create a new era for Cossack, while preserving its cultural and heritage values, and its natural and built environment. Twelve heritage-listed buildings and Jarman Island are part of the sale.
The Cossack town site precinct and the Jarman Island lighthouse and quarters are on the state register of heritage places.
The statement of significance says the precinct has several buildings constructed of local materials and archaeological sites dating from the 1870s, which have cultural heritage significance due to the fact they contain evidence of the impact of European settlement on Aboriginal communities.
The town of Cossack was one of the first in the Pilbara region, but over the years lost residents to nearby towns, such as Point Sampson and Karratha. Photo: Supplied
The precinct is also noted for the “outstanding figures in the early development of the Pilbara region, including explorer F. T. Gregory, the Padbury, Wellard, Broadhurst, Withnell and Sholl families, and Cossack identities such as the Halls and Muramats”.
During the gold rushes of the late 1880s, new immigrants arrived through Cossack, according to the heritage listing.
“At this time the settlement was linked to Roebourne with the tramway. Despite this, the town was slowly eclipsed by Point Samson, with the establishment of the jetty there,” it stated.
“In the 20th century, activities at Cossack included commerce, as seen at Muramats Store, and the turtle processing enterprise based out of the Customs Building.”
The government is looking for proposals for low-impact tourism ventures such as innovative and high-quality eco-tourism accommodation, camping, cafes and galleries, which will support the regeneration of the town’s under-utilised heritage assets, while also ensuring the long-term conservation and future management of the site.
LJ Hooker Commercial Perth director Vincent Siciliano said Cossack was a pivotal part of WA’s pearling industry.
“But Cossack sits in an amazing pocket of the Pilbara. The townsite is bordered by the azure water of the Harding River,” he said.
“This campaign presents a developer or entity with a rare chance to deliver a vision and ongoing commitment for a low-impact activation of a piece of WA’s history.”
The campaign is open until 2pm on November 20.
<www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/wa-government-is-selling-22-hectare-ghost-town-in-pilbra-region-999186>


Re: LRRSA Zoom entertainment meeting - 11 February 2021 Railways of Sydney's Upper Nepean Dam

Frank Stamford
 

A reminder that registrations for this meeting are still open, and should be made no later than Tuesday 9 February.
Frank


Re: Light Railways 277

Hunslet
 

Thank you, John.

I look forward to receiving the next issue – it usually takes about a week to get through Customs and across the border to Junee!

Cheers,

Pete

Peter Neve OAM

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Monday, 1 February 2021 3:30 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] Light Railways 277

 

Better late than never! We had a bit of a delay with the delivery of Light Railways 277, which pushed the mailout back a week. The magazine has now been handed over to Australia Post - members should see the mag dropping into their letter boxes over the next few days. 


LRRSA SA Group Meeting

John Dennis
 

Further to the announcement of the impending arrival of Light Railways 277, we have been advised that the South Australian group will be having a meeting on 4 February, at 1 Kindergarten Drive, Hawthorndene commencing at 7:30 pm.
The main topic will be the back story of press report - the “mine” at Seacliff.
Contact details are available in LR or here: http://localhost:5711/lrrsa/LRR_Meetings.html


Light Railways 277

John Dennis
 

Better late than never! We had a bit of a delay with the delivery of Light Railways 277, which pushed the mailout back a week. The magazine has now been handed over to Australia Post - members should see the mag dropping into their letter boxes over the next few days.  It's another cracking issue - contents are:

The Bellinger River breakwater story (NSW)
Yallourn, the early years – part 3 (Vic)
Lewis’ ballast siding, Pomborneit, (Vic)
Looking Back - Queensland Mills miscellany
plus the usual letters, field reports, industrial and heritage railway news.

For non-members the magazine can be purchased from your local newsagent or online from the LRRSA shop: https://shop.lrrsa.org.au/Light-Railways-No277-February-2021 as either a printed magazine or as a PDF.

John Dennis


Timber mill

Roderick Smith
 

Roderick

Sun.11.10.20 Melbourne 'Herald Sun' 
SEEKING the owner and location of the sawmill in this photo taken in September 1922, possibly in Noojee. The surnames of some men are Taylor, McKenzie and Lawson. Contact Elaine, 0413 900980 or billelaineseverino@gmail.com


201011Su-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-timber.mill.jpg


Timber industry (Vic.)

Roderick Smith
 

It has been years since tramways were used in the timber industry in Victoria, but I suspect that we still keep an eye on the industry.

Roderick

Multiple problems with state logging agency, damning audit reveals. Miki Perkins October 8, 2020
An independent audit of Victoria’s state logging operations has found multiple problems, including failures to adequately survey for threatened species, identify old-growth forest or contain post-logging burns.
Months after abandoning its latest attempt in a decade-long effort to gain sustainability certification from the Forest Stewardship Council Australia (FSC), Vicforests quietly released the council's audit report, completed in June, on the agency’s website.
The FSC investigation by independent auditors found VicForests failed to survey for threatened species at both the coupe and landscape level, including consistently failing to detect and protect Leadbeater’s possums and greater gliders.
A protester (top, right) sits in a tree during recent disruptions to logging in Victoria's native forests.
Large, ecologically-mature trees with hollows – used for habitat by endangered species – were observed to have been harvested or pushed over, auditors said.
And VicForests failed to apply conservation measures for threatened species, including forest owls, the Orbost spiny crayfish and barred galaxia fish, the report found. The auditors refused to grant the entry level of FSC certification to VicForests.
In August, the agency announced it had “decided to postpone” its attempt to gain FSC certification by the end of 2020, saying it was concerned it would not be fairly assessed because three of the council’s directors were involved in forest activism.
But Wilderness Society national campaigns director Amelia Young said that in light of the audit report it was “highly inappropriate” for VicForests to blame FSC board members for its failure to get the sustainability tick.
“Rather than take responsibility for its continued failure to gain FSC certification, VicForests has chosen to launch an extraordinary attack on the directors of an organisation formed to encourage sustainable forestry practices,” Ms Young said.
In a statement on its website, VicForests said feedback from the auditors had been incorporated into its ongoing “improvement processes” and the agency remained committed to pursuing the FSC certification process.
The agency is appealing against a landmark Federal Court ruling in May that found it had unlawfully logged areas of critically endangered Leadbeater's possum habitat.
The court decision prompted hardware giant Bunnings to end its timber supply contract with Victoria's logging agency.
On Thursday, the Victorian government asked investors and plantation developers to apply for tenders to expand the state’s plantation timber supply. The government plans to transition away from native forest harvesting to a plantation-based sector by 2030, it said in a statement.
RELATED ARTICLE Salvage logging south of Victoria's Alpine National Park. VicForests ends bid for sustainability tick
<www.theage.com.au/environment/conservation/multiple-problems-with-state-logging-agency-damning-audit-reveals-20201008-p563dj.html>

CFMMEU lash out at Andrews Government over strategy for plantations in Gippsland
Kieran Rooney October 8, 2020 Herald Sun 23 comments
CFMMEU have lashed out at the state government’s plantation strategy, labelling the scheme to expand timber plantations in East Gippsland as “Trump-like” and claiming it does little for Victoria’s timber workers.
video: Construction bosses push to scrap Saturday penalty rates to prevent industry collapse Construction bosses are pushing to scrap Saturday penalty rates, warning 450,000 jobs in the industry are at risk. The government is finalizing details of a…
Newly-released state government plans to expand timber plantations in East Gippsland have been slammed by the CFMMEU, who have labelled the policy “Trump like” and claim it does little for Victoria’s timber workers.
The Andrews Government on Thursday called for expressions of interest to develop new industrial-scale plantations in the region.
It believes the scheme will result in more than 30 million trees being planted over the next decade and increase Gippsland’s existing estates by 35 per cent.
The state government has committed to shutting down the native logging industry in Victoria by 2030.
But in a stunning rebuke, CFMMEU national secretary Michael O’Connor said the government’s plan had little substance and did not provide certainty for timber, pulp and paper workers.
“This is another half-baked re-announcement driven by an unviable ‘Trump like’ plan which is really no more than a mishmash of incoherent talking points” he said.
“We’ve been waiting three and a half years since funding for plantation establishment was announced in the 2017-18 Budget to see a program and we get this joke process instead.”
Native logging is scheduled to end in Victoria by 2030.
The union believe the government’s current plan to transition out of native forests will devastate workers and communities, with new stocks of plantation trees unlikely to be ready for pulping or wood products by 2030 when native logging ends.
“Pretending this scheme will provide a future for workers and timber communities is nothing more than a cruel hoax,” Mr O’Connor said.
Agriculture Minister Jaclyn Symes said the government’s plan was investing in the industry’s long term future.
“To ensure the best transition to a plantation-based industry, we are investing in new plantations and programs that support innovation, so that these growth markets turn into jobs and economic value for regional communities,” she said.
MORE FLIGHT ATTENDANT WHO SMUGGLED HEROIN IN UNDERWEAR JAILED
<www.heraldsun.com.au/news/cfmmeu-lash-out-at-andrews-government-over-strategy-for-plantations-in-gipssland/news-story/1c87e4916b19ee666c310e783dfd268c. [comments are all political sniping]


LRRSA Zoom entertainment meeting - 11 February 2021 Railways of Sydney's Upper Nepean Dam

Frank Stamford
 

LRRSA Zoom entertainment meeting
On Thursday 11 February at 8.00 pm AEDT (ACT, NSW, Vic., and Tas. Time). the LRRSA will be holding an online meeting via Zoom. It will go for about 60 to 90 minutes, but you will be free to leave at any time.
Times in other places: 7.30pm in SA; 7.00pm in Qld; 5.00pm in WA; 0900 UTC; 9.00am GMT Thursday 11 February.
After a brief introduction giving news of LRRSA activities, Jim Longworth will give a presentation of the tramways used in the construction of Sydney’s Upper Nepean Dams.
You do not need to be a member of the LRRSA to attend this meeting. It is open to anyone anywhere in the world. To participate you will need to register your interest, which is easy at our website https://www.lrrsa.org.au/
 
and clicking "Zoom in".
It is preferred that registrations are made no later than Tuesday 9 February at which time the meeting invitations will be emailed. Registration after that date may be accepted, but is not guaranteed. Pre-registrations will not be accepted after 7 pm AEDT on the day of the meeting.
If you have not used Zoom before we can provide assistance. You can use a PC, tablet or mobile phone, but if using a PC you will at least need speakers or headphones to participate.


Fun Fare at Scarborough, Queensland

Greg Stephenson
 


Greg Stephenson
Brisbane, Australia 

 

G’day

 

I searched through some aerial photograph available from the Queensland Government website and located the Fun Fare in the 1969 photograph.  The Zig-Zag shapes are mini-golf courses and the train ride is the circular track with an overbridge.  There was another ride in the middle of the train track.  Landsborough Street is on the right as is the entrance to the foreshore camping area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended only for the addressee and may be confidential, private or the subject of copyright. If you have received this email in error please notify Brisbane City Council, by replying to the sender or calling +61 7 3403 8888, and delete all copies of the e-mail and any attachments.


Re: Scarborough, Queensland

John Browning
 

Apologies to Jim for not mentioning his book and acknowledging his fine work in recording details of a variety of amusement lines.
But I don't believe either of us were aware before of the Father Frawley's Fun Fair line.
Greg tells me that he can just remember seeing the Luna Park amusements being dismantled.
Best wishes for 2021.
John 


Re: Scarborough, Queensland

Grant Maloney
 

Hi very interesting. I am seeking any information on the carribean gardens train  and one which used to run at Whistle stop amusement park  in Frankston. Both in Victoria.
Any info would be great.
Thanks Grant

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> on behalf of John Browning <ceo8@...>
Sent: Saturday, 26 December 2020 11:59 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Scarborough, Queensland
 
The train ride described by Greg appears to be the successor to the one that operated at Redcliffe from 1944. This was in the amusement complex known as "Luna Park" and was at Sutton's Beach. It was established by the Redcliffe Town Council who leased the rights to operate it to Wirth & Scott, who included a small railway circuit. It has been pointed out that Redcliffe would have been a magnet for US troops on R&R towards the end of the Pacific war. In 1950, Luna Park was taken over by the entrepreneurial Catholic priest Bart Frawley of St Bernadette’s Parish, and used as a fundraiser, particularly for Catholic school development. The locomotive was a loosely steam-outlined petrol powered machine.


As the town of Redcliffe developed as a residential centre and the tourists moved north to the area around Scarborough, it appears that the decision was taken to relocate the amusement area in 1966. Some of the attractions became part of what was known locally as "Father Frawley's Fun Fair" at Scarborough, which incidentally was the centre of the priest's church and school endeavours. It was here that Greg enjoyed visiting during the later 1960s. It seems that the Fun Fair closed in the early 1970s.

There were quite a few such trains of around 2ft gauge which appear to have operated in amusement parks and drive-in theatres in the period between 1945 and 1970 and only a few have been documented, so thanks to Greg for providing information on this one.

John 


Re: Scarborough, Queensland

John Browning
 

The train ride described by Greg appears to be the successor to the one that operated at Redcliffe from 1944. This was in the amusement complex known as "Luna Park" and was at Sutton's Beach. It was established by the Redcliffe Town Council who leased the rights to operate it to Wirth & Scott, who included a small railway circuit. It has been pointed out that Redcliffe would have been a magnet for US troops on R&R towards the end of the Pacific war. In 1950, Luna Park was taken over by the entrepreneurial Catholic priest Bart Frawley of St Bernadette’s Parish, and used as a fundraiser, particularly for Catholic school development. The locomotive was a loosely steam-outlined petrol powered machine.


As the town of Redcliffe developed as a residential centre and the tourists moved north to the area around Scarborough, it appears that the decision was taken to relocate the amusement area in 1966. Some of the attractions became part of what was known locally as "Father Frawley's Fun Fair" at Scarborough, which incidentally was the centre of the priest's church and school endeavours. It was here that Greg enjoyed visiting during the later 1960s. It seems that the Fun Fair closed in the early 1970s.

There were quite a few such trains of around 2ft gauge which appear to have operated in amusement parks and drive-in theatres in the period between 1945 and 1970 and only a few have been documented, so thanks to Greg for providing information on this one.

John 


Scarborough, Queensland

Michael C.
 

Season's greetings from the Formerly United Kingdom.

Just as an aside, we have a Scarborough in the UK too and it has a miniature railway!

https://nbr.org.uk/

It's unusual as it is 20" gauge.

https://nbr.org.uk/heritagerailway/

I have an album of images on Flickr. Take a look if you're interested.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/55958391@N07/83f7j3

Since I visited they've had a steam locomotive constructed.

Best wishes for Christmas and here's to a better 2021!

Michael Chapman





From: Greg Stephenson <LRRSA@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, 24 December 2020
Subject: [LRRSA] Scarborough, Queensland
To: LRRSA <LRRSA@groups.io>

G’day all
It’s Christmas Eve and I remember that growing up at Redcliffe in Queensland in the 1960’s and 1970’s that as a child we’d always go the Funfair at Scarborough on Christmas Eve to wear us out to make us sleep! It was located opposite the foreshore camping area where various uncles, aunts and cousins would spend the summer holidays.
As well as mini golf and air pistols, I recall a train ride on a circular track. From memory the locomotive was petrol powered given the noise it made! At a guess it was probably 12” to 15” gauge. 🤔 Apart from knowing it existed I have no other knowledge and don’t recall ever riding the train. I seem to recall the whole place was operated by the Catholic Parish for the benefit of De La Salle College.
The site was redeveloped into a unit block.
I wondered if anybody might have an ideas on the venture and train.

There was also another amusement train ride at Redcliffe on the foreshore at the end of ANZAC Ave. But I recall this being a circular track of smaller diameter.

Best wishes for Christmas and the New Year

Greg Stephenson
Brisbane, Australia 


Scarborough, Queensland

Greg Stephenson
 

G’day all
It’s Christmas Eve and I remember that growing up at Redcliffe in Queensland in the 1960’s and 1970’s that as a child we’d always go the Funfair at Scarborough on Christmas Eve to wear us out to make us sleep! It was located opposite the foreshore camping area where various uncles, aunts and cousins would spend the summer holidays.
As well as mini golf and air pistols, I recall a train ride on a circular track. From memory the locomotive was petrol powered given the noise it made! At a guess it was probably 12” to 15” gauge. 🤔 Apart from knowing it existed I have no other knowledge and don’t recall ever riding the train. I seem to recall the whole place was operated by the Catholic Parish for the benefit of De La Salle College.
The site was redeveloped into a unit block.
I wondered if anybody might have an ideas on the venture and train.

There was also another amusement train ride at Redcliffe on the foreshore at the end of ANZAC Ave. But I recall this being a circular track of smaller diameter.

Best wishes for Christmas and the New Year

Greg Stephenson
Brisbane, Australia 


LRRSA Zoom entertainment meeting - 10 December 2020

Frank Stamford
 

On Thursday 10 December at 8.00 pm AEDT (ACT, NSW, Vic., and Tas. Time). the LRRSA will be holding an online meeting via Zoom. It will go for about 60 to 90 minutes, but you will be free to leave at any time.
Times in other places: 7.30pm in SA; 7.00pm in Qld; 5.00pm in WA; 0900 UTC
After a brief introduction giving news of LRRSA activities, John Browning will speak about the 2 ft gauge railways built on the Western Front in World War I and the stories of the war service locomotives that found their way to Queensland after the war to haul sugar cane.
You do not need to be a member of the LRRSA to attend this meeting. It is open to anyone anywhere in the world. To participate you will need to register your interest, which is easy at our website https://www.lrrsa.org.au/
 
and clicking "Zoom in".
(If there are more than 100 registrations, preference will be given to financial members of the LRRSA)
It is preferred that registrations are made no later than Tuesday 8 December at which time the meeting invitations will be emailed. Registration after that date may be accepted, but is not guaranteed. Pre-registrations will not be accepted after 7 pm AEDT on the day of the meeting.
If you have not used Zoom before we can provide assistance. You can use a PC, tablet or mobile phone, but if using a PC you will at least need speakers or headphones to participate.


Re: Light Railways 276

John Dennis
 

Wow. Overnight delivery from Melbourne to regional Victoria. Remarkable.

John

On Fri, 27 Nov 2020, 9:47 am Bruce McLean, <mclean@...> wrote:
John,

Received your email yesterday.  Received my Light Railways at Kangaroo Flat this morning.

Something has failed somewhere with Australia Post!

Regards,
Bruce

On 26/11/2020 12:27 pm, John Dennis wrote:
The originally planned mailout date for Light Railways 276 was to be last week, but we pushed it back so we could do a traditional mailout. The magazine has now been handed over to Australia Post, so with luck Melbourne members should see it next week, those living further away it might be the week after.  It's another packed 48 page edition.
Contents of this issue are:
- The Luggage Point Tramway, Brisbane – Part 1
- Memories of Garratts on Tasmania’s West Coast
- Looking Back - South Australian miscellany
- Light Railways 276 – a milestone...
- Wilmar 40 tonne locomotive upgrades
- Book Review - In the Shadow of the Prom
Plus the usual Field Reports, Letters and Heritage & Tourist News, with the back cover displaying a couple of photos of the AIS Nebo Colliery
If you are not a member pick it up at your local newsagent, or buy online from https://shop.lrrsa.org.au/Light-Railways-No276-December-2020 - available in printed and PDF format.



Re: Light Railways 276

Bruce McLean
 

John,

Received your email yesterday.  Received my Light Railways at Kangaroo Flat this morning.

Something has failed somewhere with Australia Post!

Regards,
Bruce

On 26/11/2020 12:27 pm, John Dennis wrote:
The originally planned mailout date for Light Railways 276 was to be last week, but we pushed it back so we could do a traditional mailout. The magazine has now been handed over to Australia Post, so with luck Melbourne members should see it next week, those living further away it might be the week after.  It's another packed 48 page edition.
Contents of this issue are:
- The Luggage Point Tramway, Brisbane – Part 1
- Memories of Garratts on Tasmania’s West Coast
- Looking Back - South Australian miscellany
- Light Railways 276 – a milestone...
- Wilmar 40 tonne locomotive upgrades
- Book Review - In the Shadow of the Prom
Plus the usual Field Reports, Letters and Heritage & Tourist News, with the back cover displaying a couple of photos of the AIS Nebo Colliery
If you are not a member pick it up at your local newsagent, or buy online from https://shop.lrrsa.org.au/Light-Railways-No276-December-2020 - available in printed and PDF format.



Light Railways 276

John Dennis
 

The originally planned mailout date for Light Railways 276 was to be last week, but we pushed it back so we could do a traditional mailout. The magazine has now been handed over to Australia Post, so with luck Melbourne members should see it next week, those living further away it might be the week after.  It's another packed 48 page edition.
Contents of this issue are:
- The Luggage Point Tramway, Brisbane – Part 1
- Memories of Garratts on Tasmania’s West Coast
- Looking Back - South Australian miscellany
- Light Railways 276 – a milestone...
- Wilmar 40 tonne locomotive upgrades
- Book Review - In the Shadow of the Prom
Plus the usual Field Reports, Letters and Heritage & Tourist News, with the back cover displaying a couple of photos of the AIS Nebo Colliery
If you are not a member pick it up at your local newsagent, or buy online from https://shop.lrrsa.org.au/Light-Railways-No276-December-2020 - available in printed and PDF format.

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