Date   

Re: : Date help please

Roderick Smith
 

Thanks all.  I found my photos with ease.  The two LR issues were after the change to A4, and not sorted neatly onto my shelves, so I can't find them.

Was there only sufficient track to move equipment out of the shed, or was there also a stretch of operating track?  Everything was static for our visit.

Was the Clarkat 762 mm also?  Had it been regauged, or was it sourced from a 762 mm gauge line?

TIA

Roderick B Smith

Transport analyst



Re: Christmas Island 79

Philip G Graham
 

This heavily-modified GE 44T is definitely one of the ex NSWGR 79-class. After having been purchased from NSWGR, the unit was shipped to Western Australia for re-building to Christmas Island requirements. As you say, the 44T in NSW had the buffer/drawhook combination and the mounting plates for the buffer housings can still be seen. As well as auto-couplers being fitted the unit was re-engined, and the engine hoods modified. The Mansard roof was as delivered, as GE built from new other 44T and 45T Dropcabs with this restricted clearance feature during WWII.

Photographs of the O&K V36 working on Christmas Island are rare.

-PGG-


Re: : Date help please

Phil Rickard
 

 . . . and the tour report was in LRN 82 (June 1991)and a photo appeared on the front cover of LRN 84 (Oct 1991)

cheers    Phil Rickard


Re: Christmas Island 79

Noel Reed
 

The 44 ton loco buried in the bush appears to be one from the USA via NSWGR.  The headlight appears the same as the 79 class.  NSWGR type marker lamps were attached outboard of the engine covers. These marker lamps were the type commonly fitted to brake vans and carriages which ran at the rear of trains.

 

The red and white colours were selected by a rotating knob projecting at the bottom of the marker lamp case.  The loco in the bush has two mounting holes (probably for the marker lamp) which can be seen near the right side of the ladder (which would have been fitted after NSWGR use).  The hand rails at the side of the loco appear different to those on the 79. The front hand rail and ladder appear to be additions.

 

I never took many pictures of the 79 class locos  as during my photographic years they seemed to be a fixed part of Sydney Yard. I did however take the attached picture of 7920 shunting the 1954 Royal Train at Eveleigh carriage works sidings (commonly known as Elston’s siding after an early works manager  W. Elston).  The two 40 class locos painted blue which hauled the Royal Train can be seen in the distance.

 

Noel Reed.  

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 23 June 2015 7:19 PM
To: sncs@... [LRRSA]
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Christmas Island 79

 

 

Apologies for the endless emails.
Keep meaning to leave work, but keeping finding additional.

From Wikipedia (so it just has to be correct)


Disposal & preservation[edit]

In October 1974 the two NSWGR units were sold to the British Phosphate Commissionfor use on Christmas Island. In 1979 both were rebuilt by FR Tulk, Perth with CaterpillarD3306 engines and lower profile noses.[6] This railway closed in 1987.

  

 

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 7:15 PM, Brad Peadon <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:

Here is another shot of a loco on Christmas Island

https://flic.kr/p/ohRSuE

He is listing this as a Whitcomb.

Brad

 

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 7:09 PM, Brad Peadon <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:

Hi Noel,
             Are you saying the one in the shot above is not one of the 79 class?
  I saw a shot of the other type that were delivered and while the lowering of the nose on the 79 class made them look similar, I thought it was to far removed in cab look to be one of the 79 class.
 The loco in this shot does appear to have had its cab corners cut back as per the modification made to the 79s by NSWGR.

  About to finish work for the day. Will try to locate the shot of the other loco heavily buried in bush.

Brad

 

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 6:33 PM, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.



 

--



 

--



 

--

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.6030 / Virus Database: 4365/10080 - Release Date: 06/22/15


Re: Christmas Island 79

Frank Stamford
 


Brad,

If this is the same locomotive at the same location as illustrated in "Shays Crabs and Phosphate" page 124 then it is General Electric 9402 (B/No. 17938 of 1943) in Drumsite yard.

It looks like the same locomotive and same location to me, but from a different angle.

Regards,

Frank


On 23/06/2015 12:13 PM, Brad Peadon alcogoodwin@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 
Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

--


Re: Date help please

Frank Stamford
 

Hello Rod,

3 March 1991 "Limestone, Logs, & Locomotives" tour. Ref. "LRRSA Fiftieth Anniversary 1961-2011" pages 25 and 28.

Regards,

Frank


On 23/06/2015 12:05 PM, rodsmith@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

I am scouring my collection for photos requested by Jim for his forthcoming book.  On what date was there an LRRSA tour to Belgrave South to inspect the gasworks loco there (before they were placed to work on PBR)?

TIA

Roderick B Smith

Transport analyst



Re: Christmas Island 79

Brad P
 

Apologies for the endless emails.
Keep meaning to leave work, but keeping finding additional.

From Wikipedia (so it just has to be correct)

Disposal & preservation[edit]

In October 1974 the two NSWGR units were sold to the British Phosphate Commissionfor use on Christmas Island. In 1979 both were rebuilt by FR Tulk, Perth with CaterpillarD3306 engines and lower profile noses.[6] This railway closed in 1987.

  


On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 7:15 PM, Brad Peadon <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:
Here is another shot of a loco on Christmas Island

https://flic.kr/p/ohRSuE

He is listing this as a Whitcomb.

Brad

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 7:09 PM, Brad Peadon <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:
Hi Noel,
             Are you saying the one in the shot above is not one of the 79 class?
  I saw a shot of the other type that were delivered and while the lowering of the nose on the 79 class made them look similar, I thought it was to far removed in cab look to be one of the 79 class.
 The loco in this shot does appear to have had its cab corners cut back as per the modification made to the 79s by NSWGR.

  About to finish work for the day. Will try to locate the shot of the other loco heavily buried in bush.

Brad


On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 6:33 PM, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.




--



--




Re: Christmas Island 79

Brad P
 

Here is another shot of a loco on Christmas Island

https://flic.kr/p/ohRSuE

He is listing this as a Whitcomb.

Brad

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 7:09 PM, Brad Peadon <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:
Hi Noel,
             Are you saying the one in the shot above is not one of the 79 class?
  I saw a shot of the other type that were delivered and while the lowering of the nose on the 79 class made them look similar, I thought it was to far removed in cab look to be one of the 79 class.
 The loco in this shot does appear to have had its cab corners cut back as per the modification made to the 79s by NSWGR.

  About to finish work for the day. Will try to locate the shot of the other loco heavily buried in bush.

Brad


On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 6:33 PM, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.




--




Re: Christmas Island 79

Brad P
 

Hi Noel,
             Are you saying the one in the shot above is not one of the 79 class?
  I saw a shot of the other type that were delivered and while the lowering of the nose on the 79 class made them look similar, I thought it was to far removed in cab look to be one of the 79 class.
 The loco in this shot does appear to have had its cab corners cut back as per the modification made to the 79s by NSWGR.

  About to finish work for the day. Will try to locate the shot of the other loco heavily buried in bush.

Brad


On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 6:33 PM, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.





Re: Christmas Island 79

Noel Reed
 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 23 June 2015 12:13 PM
To: [LRRSA]; locoshed@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Christmas Island 79

 

 

Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

 

--

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.6030 / Virus Database: 4365/10080 - Release Date: 06/22/15


Re: Christmas Island 79

Stefan
 

Hello,

you will show photos of the railway on Christmas Island (between Indonesia and Australia)? That's interesting. Do you also have photos of the german V36 (buolt in the late 1930's which has been used there?

Stefan

Am 23.06.2015 um 04:13 schrieb Brad Peadon alcogoodwin@... [LRRSA]:

 
Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

--


Christmas Island 79

Brad P
 

Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

--


Date help please

Roderick Smith
 

I am scouring my collection for photos requested by Jim for his forthcoming book.  On what date was there an LRRSA tour to Belgrave South to inspect the gasworks loco there (before they were placed to work on PBR)?

TIA

Roderick B Smith

Transport analyst


Sandstone Estate, South Africa

Phil Rickard
 

from Railways Africa weekly newsletter:

"STARS OF SANDSTONE 2015

Condensed from RSSA report by Jean Dulez -

The third "Stars of Sandstone" event, 2-12 April 2015, featured special sunrise demonstration trains every second morning, using the larger locomotives with especially configured freight consists. Wednesday 8 April was set aside for a visit to Lukas Nel's workshop facility at the Transnet diesel depot in Bloemfontein. Saturday 11 April was a public open day, intended mainly for casual visitors (approximately 3,000) to ride the trains and see the other displays. At Sandstone's Hoekfontein farm, trains were operated throughout the mornings from around 09:00. Mid-mornings saw daily convoys organised by the Bloemfontein-based Armour Museum - along the various farm tracks - of military transport vehicles which visitors could ride. The early afternoon, after lunch, usually saw a military display, again by the Armour Museum, of various tanks and armoured cars, some of Russian design. The late afternoon, between 15:30 and 17:30, featured a full-length, double NGG16 Garratt-hauled passenger trip around the entire 25km, 610mm gauge railway. During each day there was a regular procession of vintage diesel tractors, steam traction engines, vintage motor cars and trucks providing regular sideshows in the vicinity of Hoekfontein station. Following this year's highly successful festival, it is planned now to hold Stars of Sandstone every two years - the next from 30 March  to  8 April 2017."




Climax Locomotive Twylight Outing 10 October 2015

Frank Stamford
 

Following the success of last year's event the Climax Locomotive Operating Committee of the Puffing Billy Preservation Society is running a "Climax Locomotive Twylight Outing" on Saturday 10 October 2015.

The train will depart Menzies Creek at 5.30pm and arrive at Lakeside at 7.15pm where a spit-roast dinner will be provided (vegetarians can be catered for). The train will then return to Menzies Creek where arrival is scheduled for 9.40pm.

The train will stop at a number of locations for listening and photographic opportunities.

The consist of the train will be canopied NQR passenger trucks, and open-top NQR passenger trucks.

The fare including the spit roast dinner and soft drinks is $70.00.

Bookings can be made at http://www.puffingbilly.com.au

 

and selecting Events & Dining

Regards,

Frank



Re: : Re: Re:: OFF TOPIC: More photographs from the UK

halfpilotstaff
 

Thanks kindly for taking the time and trouble with that information, Michael (and thus my turntable fantasies are dashed ).

Seriously, the bridge sounds to be very historically precious, almost as much as the Coalbrookdale footbridge.

halfpilotstaff


OFF TOPIC - even more photos from the UK

Michael C.
 

Hi all,
 
Here is my latest album of photos on Flickr.
 
This time they are from the 15" gauge Romney Hythe & Dymchurch Railway.
 
Take a look if you're interested:
 
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


Re: : OFF TOPIC: More photographs from the UK

Michael C.
 

Hi all,
 
On the 26th May a question was asked about some of the background details in some of my images on Flickr. These are the images:
 
 
 
I've now received an answer from the Armley Mills Industrial Museum:
 
Snip>>>>>
 
Dear Michael,

My colleague Lucy said that you wished to know more about an object that you saw during the Sierra Leone weekend.

The mystery object is actually a foot bridge that was made in Leeds and may in fact be one of the oldest footbridges in the world.

The bridge was constructed of cast iron in six sections and built by the Kirkstall Forge Company for the Great Northern Railway at Retford and later transferred to Todds Green between Stevenage and Hitchin.

The footbridge has a fish-bellied main frame with vertical members extending to hold horizontal wrought iron tension bars. Wrought iron parapet base also attached, with box frame and cross members to support a timber deck. The total span of the bridge is 52ft with a 5ft rise. The shallow cast iron arch was originally supported on brick abutments incorporating arched brick piers and staircases.

The footbridge is No. 93.a and was known as 'Halfpenny Bridge' where it stood at Toods Green. This name may relate to its former use as a toll bridge.

It is hoped that we will be able to restore the bridge in the near future now that we know more of its significance to our railway history.

Thanks for your enquiry,

Regards,

Amy

Amy Jenkinson

Assistant Curator of Industrial History

Leeds Industrial Museum Armley Mills

End snip<<<<<
 
I hope this helps?
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


 
 

In a message dated 29/05/2015 21:42:34 GMT Daylight Time, Chapmanmchapman@... writes:
Hello again,
 
I have made some enquiries with the people at Armley Mills and unfortunately the person who will know is on leave until the 16th June.
 
If and when I receive any more information I'll come back to you.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


 
 
In a message dated 29/05/2015 02:03:57 GMT Daylight Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

I'm not sure what's in the background of that image - I will investigate and come back to you.
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly

 
 
In a message dated 26/05/2015 09:06:51 GMT Daylight Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

Michael, in this photo, is that turntable remnants adjacent to where the track curves off into the grass?

https://flic.kr/p/tyMMQV

Cheerz

halfpilotsfaff


Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT [2 Attachments]

Frank Stamford
 

Hello David,

Thanks for those illustrations, which are very interesting.

Perhaps I should explain the reason I am looking for an illustration of an earlier Forney 0-4-4T locomotive.

I am collecting information which may lead to a small article on the genesis of the SAR V class and the horse operations on the Kingston - Naracoorte line. Ideally I would like to have an illustration of a Forney as running in New York in 1871, which is apparently what inspired Carl Pihl to suggest the Forney concept to Charles Beyer (of Beyer Peacock).

(From what I have read the horses were about 30 times more efficient when hauling on the railway compared to the road - but the road was absolutely terrible!)

Regards,

Frank


On 13 Jun 2015, at 10:53 pm, "'David Halfpenny (gmail)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 


On 13 Jun 2015, at 03:51, Frank Stamford frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:


I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.


Frank,

Ariel and Puck of the Billerica and Bedford RR went into service in 1877, so they aren’t exactly earlier, but they were definitely flangeless on the driving axle (the one next to the cab), and emphatically designed to run cab-forward (see ‘cow-catcher’ and main headlamp - and on the two foot way as well. 

Note from the Scale of feet on the drawing that the effective wheelbase (centre of Bissell truck to the coupled axle) is only 12 feet.

David



Warrnambool circuit

Roderick Smith
 

I am trying to caption a Jan.64 photo for a member completing a book.  Has anything been published on the kiddie circuit there?  It was electric, controlled from the ticket booth, and not from onboard.

Roderick B Smith

former RNV editor


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