Date   

The gauge question ...

sawdustoz <pevans@...>
 

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a gauge of 3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the Powelltown line.

Cheers,
PeterE.


Re: The gauge question ...

Colin Harvey
 

Mr Evans

What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was 3ft
6in gauge?

Colin

--- In LRRSA@..., "sawdustoz" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a gauge of
3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the Powelltown
line.

Cheers,
PeterE.


Re: The gauge question ...

Peter Evans <pevans@...>
 

Colin,
 
I refer to colleague Rickard who measured a sleeper complete with dogspike holes beside the line (before it disappeared under McMansions and Starter Castles). I'm pretty sure that 3-ft 6-in gauge was the measurement obtained.
 
Cordially,
Sawdustoz.


From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On Behalf Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 1:55 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...

Mr Evans

What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was 3ft
6in gauge?

Colin

--- In LRRSA@..., "sawdustoz" wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a gauge
> greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are the
> McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the Wombat
> Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David Mitchell
> firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In addition,
> there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a gauge of
3-
> ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the Powelltown
line.
>
> Cheers,
> PeterE.
>





Re: The gauge question ...

BLI BLI <alcogoodwin@...>
 

Hi Peter,
The front page may require a rewording I
think. I just threw it together in a hurry this
morning.
Such operations would of course be considered in
topic. I tend to consider logging railways to be an
industrial operation and thus fit into #1 on the front
page. This may indeed be a wrong decision on my part.
The main reason for having the 3ft6 in #2 was to
avoid items like Queensland Rail which isn't within
the scope of Light Railways.
I pretty much use Light Railways as a guide to
topics covered with a small diversion in the inclusion
of modelling of industrial topics.

Anyway welcome to the group guys, it is great to
have you here.

Regards
Brad

--- sawdustoz <pevans@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light
railways with a gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring
to mind are the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse
trams of the Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the
David Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard
gauge). In addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light
railways" with a gauge of 3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of
the Powelltown line.

Cheers,
PeterE.





#### LocoShed Australasia Website ####
http://www.geocities.com/steelhaven_ee/LocoShed.html
** Australian Industrial & Preserved Railways.
** Railways of the Philippines and South East Asia
** LocoShed Express in 'Railway Digest'
** Asst editor: Asia-Rail magazine.

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Re: The gauge question ...

Colin Harvey
 

Peter

I have no doubt there was a 3ft 6in gauge sleeper, but was it from
the firewood line or one of the overburden tramways? I suspect the
latter is more likely. Not that this precludes the firewood tram
from being 3ft 6in gauge, it's just not sufficient evidence in my
opinion.

Humbly
Colin



--- In LRRSA@..., "Peter Evans" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Colin,

I refer to colleague Rickard who measured a sleeper complete with
dogspike
holes beside the line (before it disappeared under McMansions and
Starter
Castles). I'm pretty sure that 3-ft 6-in gauge was the measurement
obtained.

Cordially,
Sawdustoz.

_____

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On
Behalf
Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 1:55 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...


Mr Evans

What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was
3ft
6in gauge?

Colin

--- In LRRSA@..., "sawdustoz" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a
gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are
the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the
Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In
addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a
gauge of
3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the
Powelltown
line.

Cheers,
PeterE.


Re: The gauge question ...

bll_hnks
 

Gentlemen,

It's good to see the discussions have gotten off to a contentious
start. May they all be in the right spirit.

Hooroo,

Bill Hanks
--- In LRRSA@..., "Peter Evans" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Colin,

I refer to colleague Rickard who measured a sleeper complete with
dogspike
holes beside the line (before it disappeared under McMansions and
Starter
Castles). I'm pretty sure that 3-ft 6-in gauge was the measurement
obtained.

Cordially,
Sawdustoz.

_____

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
On Behalf
Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 1:55 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...


Mr Evans

What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was
3ft
6in gauge?

Colin

--- In LRRSA@..., "sawdustoz" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a
gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are
the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the
Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In
addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a
gauge of
3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the
Powelltown
line.

Cheers,
PeterE.


Re: The gauge question ...

Peter Evans <pevans@...>
 

Dear Humble Colin,
 
I also seem to recall some photographic scaling going on to determine the gauge of the wierd geared steam beastie which as believed to be the first locomotive used on the line. Did this not indicate a gauge substantially less than Standard?
 
Respectfully
Sawdustoz. 


From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On Behalf Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 2:22 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...

Peter

I have no doubt there was a 3ft 6in gauge sleeper, but was it from
the firewood line or one of the overburden tramways?  I suspect the
latter is more likely.  Not that this precludes the firewood tram
from being 3ft 6in gauge, it's just not sufficient evidence in my
opinion.

Humbly
Colin



--- In LRRSA@..., "Peter Evans" wrote:
>
> Colin,

> I refer to colleague Rickard who measured a sleeper complete with
dogspike
> holes beside the line (before it disappeared under McMansions and
Starter
> Castles). I'm pretty sure that 3-ft 6-in gauge was the measurement
obtained.

> Cordially,
> Sawdustoz.
>
>   _____ 
>
> From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On
Behalf
> Of Colin Harvey
> Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 1:55 PM
> To: LRRSA@...
> Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...
>
>
> Mr Evans
>
> What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was
3ft
> 6in gauge?
>
> Colin
>
> --- In LRRSA@..., "sawdustoz" wrote:
> >
> > Hi All,
> >
> > Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a
gauge
> > greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are
the
> > McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the
Wombat
> > Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David Mitchell
> > firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In
addition,
> > there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a
gauge of
> 3-
> > ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the
Powelltown
> line.
> >
> > Cheers,
> > PeterE.
> >
>






Re: The gauge question ...

Peter Evans <pevans@...>
 

Thanks Brad,
 
Point taken. I think this group is an excellent idea and congratulations on getting it up and running.
 
Cheers,
PeterE.


From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On Behalf Of BLI BLI
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 2:22 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] The gauge question ...

Hi Peter,
         The front page may require a rewording I
think. I just threw it together in a hurry this
morning.
  Such operations would of course be considered in
topic. I tend to consider logging railways to be an
industrial operation and thus fit into #1 on the front
page. This may indeed be a wrong decision on my part.
  The main reason for having the 3ft6 in #2 was to
avoid items like Queensland Rail which isn't within
the scope of Light Railways.
  I pretty much use Light Railways as a guide to
topics covered with a small diversion in the inclusion
of modelling of industrial topics.

  Anyway welcome to the group guys, it is great to
have you here.

Regards
Brad

--- sawdustoz wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> Perhaps this group might like to consider light
> railways with a gauge
> greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring
> to mind are the
> McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse
> trams of the Wombat
> Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the
> David Mitchell
> firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard
> gauge). In addition,
> there were heaps of very traditional "light
> railways" with a gauge of 3-
> ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of
> the Powelltown line.
>
> Cheers,
> PeterE.
>
>
>
>
>


#### LocoShed Australasia Website ####
      http://www.geocities.com/steelhaven_ee/LocoShed.html
   ** Australian Industrial & Preserved Railways.
   ** Railways of the Philippines and South East Asia
   ** LocoShed Express in 'Railway Digest'
   ** Asst editor: Asia-Rail magazine.

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


LRRSA Group

bll_hnks
 

Brad,

 

Thank-you for establishing this group.

 

It’s good to see that it has gotten off to a contentious start.  May it all be in the same good spirit.

 

Regards,

 

Bill.

 


Re: The gauge question ...

Colin Harvey
 

Peter (I've run out of salutations)

Did this not indicate a gauge substantially less than Standard?
Very suggestive of a gauge less than standard...but it could be metre
like Hartley Vale!

Colin


--- In LRRSA@..., "Peter Evans" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Dear Humble Colin,

I also seem to recall some photographic scaling going on to
determine the
gauge of the wierd geared steam beastie which as believed to be the
first
locomotive used on the line. Did this not indicate a gauge
substantially
less than Standard?

Respectfully
Sawdustoz.

_____

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On
Behalf
Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 2:22 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...


Peter

I have no doubt there was a 3ft 6in gauge sleeper, but was it from
the firewood line or one of the overburden tramways? I suspect the
latter is more likely. Not that this precludes the firewood tram
from being 3ft 6in gauge, it's just not sufficient evidence in my
opinion.

Humbly
Colin



--- In LRRSA@..., "Peter Evans" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Colin,

I refer to colleague Rickard who measured a sleeper complete with
dogspike
holes beside the line (before it disappeared under McMansions and
Starter
Castles). I'm pretty sure that 3-ft 6-in gauge was the
measurement
obtained.

Cordially,
Sawdustoz.

_____

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
On
Behalf
Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 1:55 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...


Mr Evans

What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was
3ft
6in gauge?

Colin

--- In LRRSA@..., "sawdustoz" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a
gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are
the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the
Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David
Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In
addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a
gauge of
3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the
Powelltown
line.

Cheers,
PeterE.


Re: The gauge question ...

Frank Stamford
 

When the LRRSA changed its name from Victorian Light Railway Research Society to Light Railway Research Society of Australia in 1968 (only 36 years ago) the coverage was intended to be:

(i) Any Australian railway or tramway with a gauge of less than 3 ft 6 in

(ii) Any Australian railway or tramway with a gauge of 3 ft 6 in or more which was not owned by the state government railways or the Commonwealth Railways.

This definition included city passenger carrying tramways, but these were largely (and deliberately) ignored because they were already well looked after by another organisation.

This definition was designed to include operations like the Emu Bay Railway, Kerang - Koondrook Shire Tramway, and the Queensland Shire Tramways.

I don't think we have ever officially changed from these definitions, although they have become more complicated to define since most of the operations in item (ii) above are now privatised.

I think if we changed our definition of "light railway" to the extent that it excluded operations like the 3 ft 6 in gauge Aramac and Beaudesert Shire Tramways, and the 5 ft 3 in gauge Koondrook Shire Tramway, we would be narrowing our focus too far, since they were all weird, poverty-stricken and eccentric operations, and surely these are some of the essential features of the traditional "light railway"!

Regards,

Frank

At 02:34 PM 15/08/2006, you wrote:
Thanks Brad,

Point taken. I think this group is an excellent idea and congratulations on getting it up and running.

Cheers,
PeterE.


----------
From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On Behalf Of BLI BLI
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 2:22 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] The gauge question ...

Hi Peter,
The front page may require a rewording I
think. I just threw it together in a hurry this
morning.
Such operations would of course be considered in
topic. I tend to consider logging railways to be an
industrial operation and thus fit into #1 on the front
page. This may indeed be a wrong decision on my part.
The main reason for having the 3ft6 in #2 was to
avoid items like Queensland Rail which isn't within
the scope of Light Railways.
I pretty much use Light Railways as a guide to
topics covered with a small diversion in the inclusion
of modelling of industrial topics.

Anyway welcome to the group guys, it is great to
have you here.

Regards
Brad

--- sawdustoz <pevans@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light
railways with a gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring
to mind are the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse
trams of the Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the
David Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard
gauge). In addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light
railways" with a gauge of 3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of
the Powelltown line.

Cheers,
PeterE.


Re: LRRSA Group

BLI BLI <alcogoodwin@...>
 

--- Bill Hanks <bhanks@...>
wrote:

Brad,
Thank-you for establishing this group.



It's good to see that it has gotten off to a
contentious start. May it
all be in the same good spirit.
Regards,
Bill.>>>>>>

Hi Bill,
It is my pleasure, I am looking forward to
meeting so many like minded people and many whos names
I have seen over the years of being a LRRSA member.
I was surprised to see postings so soon. Hopefully
this is a great sign for the future and that the group
encourages a lot more interest in our great society.

Regards
Brad

#### LocoShed Australasia Website ####
http://www.geocities.com/steelhaven_ee/LocoShed.html
** Australian Industrial & Preserved Railways.
** Railways of the Philippines and South East Asia
** LocoShed Express in 'Railway Digest'
** Asst editor: Asia-Rail magazine.

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


New file uploaded to LRRSA

LRRSA@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the LRRSA
group.

File : /This is the LRRSA Yahoogroup.doc
Uploaded by : johnkenyonbrowning <ceo8@...>
Description : Proposal to redraft front page remarks for Group

You can access this file at the URL

http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/files/This%20is%20the%20LRRSA%20Yahoogroup.doc

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit

http://help.yahoo.com/help/au/groups/files

Regards,

johnkenyonbrowning <ceo8@...>


The gauge question - David Mitchell

John Browning
 

Dear humble and respectful (both of you)

 

The records of George D Whitcomb of Rochelle, Illinois, USA, indicate that in May 1924 he supplied a Model MO 7-ton 4-wheel petrol locomotive with a Waukesha engine fitted with 24” driving wheels to Gilbert & McAuliffe, Melbourne for David Mitchell Estate, Cave Hill, Lilydale.

The locomotive’s gauge was recorded as 36” (ie 3ft)

 

Diligently

 

John

 

John Browning
Rockhampton
Queensland
Australia

 

PO Box 5646
Central Queensland Mail Centre  4702

 

Phone +61 (0) 7 4926 6356
Mobile 0407 069 199

 

 


LRRSA Yahoo group

John Browning
 

 

Gentlemen

 

I have done some work to refine Brad's draft for the front page of the group (and I haven't yet read the debate that has already started over the gauge question). We are revisiting an age-old question here and I think we need to emphasise (somehow) that the categories are not exclusive of each other.

 

Can I suggest the wording that has been posted to the files section on the Group page. (You’ll be notified of this separately and given a link.). I'm happy to explain anything, but have noted carefully the approaches used by a number of other groups of which I am a member in order to make their membership inclusive but not open slather.

 

I would also like at this stage to volunteer to share with Brad the moderator role as if we have any difficulty with errant members, it is always best to have a “brains trust” to decide what to do. I’d suggest we need a third moderator and would like to suggest Frank if he is available. The duties of the non-owner moderators is likely to be consultative to Brad more than anything else.

 

I’ll now go and read those contentious offerings that have appeared already.

 

By the way, I use the “daily digest” option to receive messages.

 

 

John

 

John Browning

Rockhampton

Queensland

Australia

 

PO Box 5646

Central Queensland Mail Centre  4702

 

Phone +61 (0) 7 4926 6356

Mobile 0407 069 199

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Frank Stamford [mailto:frank.stamford@...]
Sent:
Tuesday, 15 August 2006 11:48 AM
To: Bill Hanks; Bob McKillop; Chris and Phil Rickard; Bruce Belbin; Colin Harvey; Colin Harvey; David Whiteford; Hugh Markwick; John Browning; Ken Milbourne; Malcolm Dow; Mike McCarthy; Peter Evans; Phil Rickard; Richard Warwick; Wayne D. Brown; Andrew Hennell; Frank Savery; cjmoonie@...; BLI BLI
Subject: RE: LRRSA - Proposed Yahoo group

 

Blokes,

 

I suggested to Brad that it might be useful to set up the LRRSA Yahoo group

on a pilot basis with just the people on the address list of this email as

the initial members.

 

That way we can use the group to discuss its development and how we

advertise it, and if you have not had experience of a Yahoo group, it will

be a good way to see how they work.

 

Probably later today you will get an invitation from Brad to join the LRRSA

Yahoo group. I urge you to come on board. It costs nothing, and is easy to

escape from if you don't like it!

 

Regards,

 

Frank


The gauge question - David Mitchell Estate

Phil Rickard <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

Blokes,

John is correct in that the DME's overburden lines and works' lines
around the kiln's were 3ft-gauge. A very good photo of a TACL loco,
also on 3ft-ga exists - it is hauling skips around the kilns.
A 1920's (?) photo of the quarry also shows a loco therein - another
TACL maybe or the Whitcombe hauling trucks to the incline base?
The o/b lines used Western dump trucks and maybe it was on these that
the Whitcombe got a job. (The Commonwealth Engineer Nov 1926 only
shows std gauge and 3ft gauge - this is about the time of a major
upgrade of the plant and long after the original narrow-gauge firewood
tramway had give way to 4ft 8½ins-gauge)

The sleeper I found "out the back", next to the firewood tramway
formation, was a fair way from the works and the o/b dumps, but
immediately adjacent to the tramway (in the sort of position you might
toss it if you were re-sleepering and had no further use for it.) All
of which proves nothing.

I took photos and measurements at the time and 3ft 6ins comes to mind
but I'll go searching the Agfa boxes to confirm!

As Colin mentioned, scaling the best photo we have of the original
0-4-0G loco gives a gauge anywhere from 3ft to 3ft 6ins - maybe it was
one metre! I was hoping that roadworks on Swansea Road 11-12 years'
ago (Melway 38 G7) might find a sleeper from the 1890's but nothing
appeared, although the road people were looking (so they said).

cheers Phil


LRRSA group

John Browning
 

We also need to add to the front page the information that material posted may be adapted for use in LRRSA publications as well as the disclaimer that was proposed.

 

Cheers

 

John

 

John Browning
Rockhampton
Queensland
Australia

 

PO Box 5646
Central Queensland Mail Centre  4702

 

Phone +61 (0) 7 4926 6356
Mobile 0407 069 199

 

 


New file uploaded to LRRSA

LRRSA@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the LRRSA
group.

File : /This is the LRRSA Yahoogroup-3.doc
Uploaded by : fstamford <frank.stamford@...>
Description : Modified and annotated version of redrafted front page remarks for Group with disclaimer etc

You can access this file at the URL

http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/files/This%20is%20the%20LRRSA%20Yahoogroup-3.doc

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit

http://help.yahoo.com/help/au/groups/files

Regards,

fstamford <frank.stamford@...>


Want to buy a steam locomotive, traction engine or car ?

Frank Stamford
 

Here is a very interesting web site if you have an urgent need to buy a steam locomotive, traction engine, steam truck, or steam car:

http://www.prestonservices.co.uk/

Regards,

Frank


A Children's Book

bll_hnks
 

I have been lent a children’s book published by the Forest Education Foundation of Tasmania in 2004 called “postcards from the town that disappeared”.  Story and text are by Celia Lendis and it is illustrated by John Lendis.  It has been given a “Notable Book” classification by the Children’s Book Council of Australia.  It is contains numerous coloured illustrations of people, the sawmill, the tramway and other activities in the bush. 

 

From the back cover: -

 

“Postcards from the town that disappeared”, takes us on a journey with an eleven year old boy and his pony called Joe.  Together they travel though the thick forests of Tasmania to deliver mail to the town of Wielangta after school.  This was to be the boy’s last summer delivering mail, before a series of bushfires ravaged the area and the town was finally abandoned.  Set during the 1920s, this fictional story, along with the richly evocative paintings, archival photographs and snippets of correspondence, creates a vivid historical portrait of the hardships and joys of living and working in a timber town in Tasmania during the early decades of the twentieth century”.

 

To me the book has a good feel to it and should not be dismissed a being merely a children’s book.  I believe it has a place beside other serious works in our libraries because of the historical references contained within it.

 

Regards,

 

Bill Hanks.