Date   

Kerrisdale Mountain Railway loco - from Narrow Gauge World in the UK

Andrew Charman <andrew.charman@...>
 

Hi, I'm Andrew Charman and I edit Narrow Gauge World magazine in the UK.

One of my correspondents recently showed me photos which I believe came from yourselves of the newly completed locomotive at the Kerrisdale Mountain Railway. I'd like to include a piece on it in the World News pages of my next issue and was hoping I might get permission to reproduce the photo?

Thanks in hope!

Regards

Andrew C

_____________________________________________

Andrew Charman

Editor, Narrow Gauge World magazine, Engineering in Miniature magazine


12 Maes Gwyn, Llanfair Caereinion, Powys, SY21 0BD

Tel: +44 (0)1938 810592, Mobile: + 44 (0) 7802711810

E-mail: Andrew.charman@...

Web: www.narrow-gauge-world.co.uk www.engineeringinminiature.co.uk

Facebook: www.facebook.com/narrowgaugeworld/ https://www.facebook.com/engineeringinminiature/

Twitter: @NarrowGaugeWrld



Re: Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

David in Avenel
 

Well that's what happens when a post is not read a 4th or 5th time for spell checker corrections.  Closer is absolutely what is meant, Andrew has put too much effort into it so far for closure to be on the horizon.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Re: Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

Michael C.
 

Closer not closure I trust!

Michael Chapman




On Monday, 5 April 2021 David in Avenel <LRRSA@groups.io> wrote:

Andrew and Jennifer certainly have a splendid location and as you say the views are stunning on a sunny day.  A ride behind Douglas (or is that in front of Douglas) is getting closure by the day.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Re: Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

David in Avenel
 

Andrew and Jennifer certainly have a splendid location and as you say the views are stunning on a sunny day.  A ride behind Douglas (or is that in front of Douglas) is getting closure by the day.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Re: Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

Michael C.
 

G'day from the Formerly United Kingdom.

Photos from my first trip to Kerrisdale can be seen here.

It's a brilliant set-up and the views from the top are amazing.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/55958391@N07/BK41JL

Photos from my second trip to Kerrisdale are here.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/55958391@N07/9kQ3Zn

It's great to see the progress with the steam locomotive!

Michael Chapman




On Sunday, 4 April 2021 John Dennis <LRRSA@groups.io> wrote:

That looks splendid indeed. An excellent job. It's been too long since I last visited - I do plan to return one day...

On Sun, 4 Apr 2021 at 12:17, David in Avenel <espee8800@...> wrote:
Was visiting Andrew and Jennifer last week and here are two shots of Douglas taken that day.  Needless to say Andrew had a grin from ear to ear, it is looking quite magnificent.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

Tony Coen
 

Brilliant. I too will have to make a visit.
 
Tony Coen.
 

Sent: Sunday, April 04, 2021 12:20 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway
 
That looks splendid indeed. An excellent job. It's been too long since I last visited - I do plan to return one day...
 
On Sun, 4 Apr 2021 at 12:17, David in Avenel <espee8800@...> wrote:
Was visiting Andrew and Jennifer last week and here are two shots of Douglas taken that day.  Needless to say Andrew had a grin from ear to ear, it is looking quite magnificent.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

John Dennis
 

That looks splendid indeed. An excellent job. It's been too long since I last visited - I do plan to return one day...


On Sun, 4 Apr 2021 at 12:17, David in Avenel <espee8800@...> wrote:
Was visiting Andrew and Jennifer last week and here are two shots of Douglas taken that day.  Needless to say Andrew had a grin from ear to ear, it is looking quite magnificent.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Douglas - Kerrisdale Mountain Railway

David in Avenel
 

Was visiting Andrew and Jennifer last week and here are two shots of Douglas taken that day.  Needless to say Andrew had a grin from ear to ear, it is looking quite magnificent.

--

cheers and best wishes,
David in Avenel.au,    
[Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.]




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Cossack (WA)

David Whiteford
 

Rodney’s Point Samson is definitely Point Samson and not Roebourne. Point Samson still had significant sheds and trackage in the 1970s, Roebourne had nothing.

 

David Whiteford

 

 

From: Roderick Smith via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 7 February 2021 12:17 PM
To: lrrsa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

880404M - PointSamson pier (demolished1989-91) -RSmith.  I have the original if it is useful for LR.

 

880404M-WA-PointSamson.  (RSmith) I captioned this as Point Samson, but it may be Roebourne.  This would have to be compared with photos which the editor has for the article.

 

I took only a few photos on this rushed visit; the others are not yet scanned.

 

200727M-Fairfax-Domain-Carnarvon(WA)-d-pier.jpg

 

Roderick

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Melbourne's sewerage scheme

rthorne475
 

John,

All nine of the attachments turned up with Roderick's original email, so no problem there.

Richard

On Sunday, 7 February 2021, 04:00:48 GMT, John Browning <ceo8@...> wrote:


Only two attachments now show up on messages delivered by email.
Roderick's other images can be seen if you view the message online at https://groups.io/g/LRRSA/message/10215
John


Re: Cossack (WA)

Roderick Smith
 

880404M - PointSamson pier (demolished1989-91) -RSmith.  I have the original if it is useful for LR.

880404M-WA-PointSamson.  (RSmith) I captioned this as Point Samson, but it may be Roebourne.  This would have to be compared with photos which the editor has for the article.

I took only a few photos on this rushed visit; the others are not yet scanned.

200727M-Fairfax-Domain-Carnarvon(WA)-d-pier.jpg

Roderick


Re: Melbourne's sewerage scheme

John Browning
 

Only two attachments now show up on messages delivered by email.
Roderick's other images can be seen if you view the message online at https://groups.io/g/LRRSA/message/10215
John


Re: Davenport Locos - Issue 277 - Letters

bjr2105
 

Hi Richard and Chris,

 

Thanks for the info on the two I was unsure about.

 

I knew what the BHP loco was, aptly described by Chris, but was unsure where it ended up (strangely, there is nothing obvious on the Pichi Richi website though…?).  There is an interesting bit of info on this loco on pages 27-29 of ‘BHP Tramways Centenary History’ by David Griffiths that is available online at https://www.minnipasiding.com.au/peninsula-pioneer/downloads/bhp%20tramways%20centenary%20v2.pdf

 

Regarding 1618, I had forgotten the article in LR 097 of July 1987 on Mortlake Gas Works where this loco was mentioned.

 

It’s wonderful to be able to ask a couple of simple questions and get it all answered so quickly (and to take a side track into looking at the histories at BHP and Mortlake)..

 

Thank you,

Bruce Rankin

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of rthorne475 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, 6 February 2021 23:34
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Davenport Locos - Issue 277 - Letters

 

Bruce,

 

You now know what 2118 is.  I've not looked at the link, but if it doesn't say, the loco is now a static exhibit on the Pichi Richi Railway.

 

1618 was a 0-4-0ST with the Australian Gas Light Co., Mortlake Gasworks, Sydney.

 

Richard Horne

 

On Saturday, 6 February 2021, 03:27:06 GMT, bjr2105 <brucerankin@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi all,

 

I’ve just been reading the letters in the latest LRRSA magazine, specifically that from Dr Gregory Oehm on page 41.

 

In his very interesting letter, he notes the number on 1513 and then mentions 1595 and 1596.

 

On the complete listing of Davenport locomotives, which I have just been through, there are a total of 5 locos that came from Davenports to Australia, these being listed below from the information in their builders list.

 

Shop No

Size

Type

Gauge

Date

Name

Location

1513

1595

1596

1618

2118

10x14

10x14

10x14

6x10

E-20

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

8W-2TR-G

24”

24”

24”

36”

42”

11/14

5/17

5/17

6/17

12/27

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Broken Hill Proprietary Co.

Sydney, NSW

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Melbourne, Australia

 

Shop No 1618 is also listed as coming to Sydney and Shop No 2118 to BHP.

 

Anyone have details on where these two ended up working?

 

Cheers,

Bruce Rankin


Re: Davenport Locos - Issue 277 - Letters

rthorne475
 

Bruce,

You now know what 2118 is.  I've not looked at the link, but if it doesn't say, the loco is now a static exhibit on the Pichi Richi Railway.

1618 was a 0-4-0ST with the Australian Gas Light Co., Mortlake Gasworks, Sydney.

Richard Horne

On Saturday, 6 February 2021, 03:27:06 GMT, bjr2105 <brucerankin@...> wrote:


Hi all,

 

I’ve just been reading the letters in the latest LRRSA magazine, specifically that from Dr Gregory Oehm on page 41.

 

In his very interesting letter, he notes the number on 1513 and then mentions 1595 and 1596.

 

On the complete listing of Davenport locomotives, which I have just been through, there are a total of 5 locos that came from Davenports to Australia, these being listed below from the information in their builders list.

 

Shop No

Size

Type

Gauge

Date

Name

Location

1513

1595

1596

1618

2118

10x14

10x14

10x14

6x10

E-20

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

8W-2TR-G

24”

24”

24”

36”

42”

11/14

5/17

5/17

6/17

12/27

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Broken Hill Proprietary Co.

Sydney, NSW

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Melbourne, Australia

 

Shop No 1618 is also listed as coming to Sydney and Shop No 2118 to BHP.

 

Anyone have details on where these two ended up working?

 

Cheers,

Bruce Rankin


Re: Davenport Locos - Issue 277 - Letters

Chris Stratton
 

2118 was a petrol-electric that worked at Whyalla, I think it was originally numbered PE10. Later converted to diesel-electric and renumbered DE10. A little bit of info and a photo here https://www.minnipasiding.com.au/peninsula-pioneer/bwdiesel.html
If I was at home I'd be able to find more info.

Regards,
Chris



----- Original Message -----
From:
LRRSA@groups.io

To:
<LRRSA@groups.io>
Cc:

Sent:
Sat, 6 Feb 2021 14:26:58 +1100
Subject:
[LRRSA] Davenport Locos - Issue 277 - Letters


Hi all,

 

I’ve just been reading the letters in the latest LRRSA magazine, specifically that from Dr Gregory Oehm on page 41.

 

In his very interesting letter, he notes the number on 1513 and then mentions 1595 and 1596.

 

On the complete listing of Davenport locomotives, which I have just been through, there are a total of 5 locos that came from Davenports to Australia, these being listed below from the information in their builders list.

 

Shop No

Size

Type

Gauge

Date

Name

Location

1513

1595

1596

1618

2118

10x14

10x14

10x14

6x10

E-20

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

8W-2TR-G

24”

24”

24”

36”

42”

11/14

5/17

5/17

6/17

12/27

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Broken Hill Proprietary Co.

Sydney, NSW

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Melbourne, Australia

 

Shop No 1618 is also listed as coming to Sydney and Shop No 2118 to BHP.

 

Anyone have details on where these two ended up working?

 

Cheers,

Bruce Rankin


Email sent using Optus Webmail


Davenport Locos - Issue 277 - Letters

bjr2105
 

Hi all,

 

I’ve just been reading the letters in the latest LRRSA magazine, specifically that from Dr Gregory Oehm on page 41.

 

In his very interesting letter, he notes the number on 1513 and then mentions 1595 and 1596.

 

On the complete listing of Davenport locomotives, which I have just been through, there are a total of 5 locos that came from Davenports to Australia, these being listed below from the information in their builders list.

 

Shop No

Size

Type

Gauge

Date

Name

Location

1513

1595

1596

1618

2118

10x14

10x14

10x14

6x10

E-20

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-4-0

8W-2TR-G

24”

24”

24”

36”

42”

11/14

5/17

5/17

6/17

12/27

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Frank R. Perrot

Broken Hill Proprietary Co.

Sydney, NSW

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Melbourne, Australia

 

Shop No 1618 is also listed as coming to Sydney and Shop No 2118 to BHP.

 

Anyone have details on where these two ended up working?

 

Cheers,

Bruce Rankin


Re: Melbourne's sewerage scheme

denis.wasley
 

A few points.
1 The problems in Melbourne were common with all big cities and in London, led to what became know as "The Big Stink", which in turn resulted in the UK Parliament being forced to act and build their extensive sewerage system.
2 When Geelong built their sewerage system, our Bagnall Nº 1801 of 1906, was used on the contractor's railway built alongside the main outfall to transport the pipes and other gear to the head of construction. It was still 2'6" gauge in those days after having been on the Long Tunnel Gold Mine's timber tramway at Walhalla.
3 In the late 80's/early 90's, a group of steam ploughing enthusiasts recreated the scene in the last attachment at Werribee when we used Fowler Z7 ploughing engines to do some steam ploughing on the sewerage farm at Werribee. We did this on two occasions. Two of the memorable things about those weekends were the flies and the "Big Stink".

Cheers
Denis Wasley
Cobdogla Museum

-----Original Message-----
From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roderick Smith via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, 6 February 2021 11:43 AM
To: lrrsa@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] Melbourne's sewerage scheme

Roderick.

How Melbourne solved its sewage problem. Mitchell Toy October 2, 2018 Herald Sun MELBOURNE was booming 50 years after it was founded. Flush with money from the gold rush it was soon to become the biggest city in the British Empire outside of London. But there was one aspect of Melbourne that wasn’t so marvellous.
video: Where Melbourne's laneways came from FIFTY years after John Batman and the Port Phillip Association founded Melbourne the place was booming.
The population hit 280,000 by 1880 and was well on the way to 500,000 just a decade later.
For a while it was the largest city in the British Empire outside London.
After the gold rush had poured people and money into Victoria, ambitious public works were underway such as the Exhibition Building and the new Princes Bridge.
But there was one aspect of Melbourne that wasn’t so marvellous.
Melbourne in 1880, when the city still did not have a sewer system. Picture: State Library of Victoria It was the reason our fair city, considered one of the finest in the world, still attracted the nickname “Smellbourne”.
In the fifty years since its inception, as its railway lines and suburbs spread south of Brighton and north of Preston, there still was no underground sewer system.
And if the smell wasn’t bad enough, the onset of typhoid in the late 1800s forced the hand of government to build the Werribee treatment plant.
NIGHT SOIL
Night soil, the euphemism for raw sewage, was a constant menace in Melbourne in the late 1800s.
It flowed through open drains, was dumped in streets or was transported away in large pots from cesspits or tanks.
Waste from kitchens, chamber pots and industrial buildings was poured out into rivers and streams, including the Yarra.
A drawing depicting a camp at the Alfred Hospital to treat sufferers of typhoid in the late 1800s. Picture: State Library of Victoria A late Nineteenth Century illustration depicting one of the many fever outbreaks in Melbourne. Picture: State Library of Victoria.
Home toilets were not connected to pipes and often had little more than a bucket at their base.
The collection and disposal of the pots was something that continued in Melbourne outhouses well into the 20th Century.
In 1880 the night soil was often carried out to the fringes of the city and used as effective fertiliser.
But the streets of Melbourne were themselves open sewers and the health of waterways was deteriorating rapidly.
The whole business was not only smelly but lethal.
DISEASE OUTBREAKS
Despite the overpowering smell, theories about the spread of disease through germs and the stark danger of open sewers were not widely accepted and the shocking rate of typhoid death and infant mortality was not immediately linked to the squalid streets.
Ubiquitous Australian flies — unfamiliar to many Melbourne residents who were born overseas — helped the disease spread effortlessly among the city’s growing populace.
Disease was ever present. Between 1869 and 1878 typhoid alone had killed an estimated 1100 people climbing to more than 220 per year in the late 1870s.
More outbreaks in the 1880s clogged hospitals and killed hundreds.
Work on the main Melbourne drain in the 1880s. Picture: State Library of Victoria By 1889 the drainage problem was recognised as a cause of typhoid with a government notice stating that, when a new case was identified, drains in and around the property had to be flushed by an appointed inspector at least once every 24 hours.
Inspectors were to use sulfate of iron or carbolic acid to cleanse the area, in public health instructions never before issued.
New regulations also called for private closets to be aired and disinfected, and the sweeping and cleaning of streets to be more vigorous.
But by now there was no getting around the fact that an underground sewer was well overdue.
An illustration of plans for a new sewer network reaching out to Werribee. Picture: State Library of Victoria PLANS FOR THE WERRIBEE FARM Despite the toll of bad hygiene on the public, work on a new sewer system didn’t get underway until the early 1890s.
The freshly founded Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works drew up a drainage system that gathered sewage underground at Spotswood.
From there a pumping station powered by steam would be built to push the waste out to a new sewage farm at Werribee.
An illustration of the new sewage farm at Werribee. Picture: State Library of Victoria Mordialloc was briefly considered as an alternative site for the treatment plant before land at Werribee was deemed cheaper; the board bought more than 8800 acres from the Chirnside family at a price of 17 pounds per acre.
The project, one of the largest of its kind in colonial Australia, was completed in 1897.
Four years later Melbourne was the capital of a federated Australia and had shaken its reputation for smelly streets.
THE DARK, DEBAUCHED PAST OF OUR LANEWAYS EARLY MELBOURNE: THE SITES THAT SHAPED OUR CITY <www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyle/melbourne/how-melbourne-solved-its-sewage-problem/news-story/8c27c9dc62b6cd8b06930ea618c4a53f>
* A lot of human waste still flows into the Yarra and is why swimming in it is a health risk. Its E. coli levels downstream are off the scale.
* classy bricklaying in the main sewer
* it is hoped that the viaducts will always have heritage protection

"180709M-Melbourne'Age'-sewer.excavation-b.jpg" "180709M-Melbourne'Age'-sewer.excavation-a.jpg" "180709M-Melbourne'Age'-1892Melbourne.sewer.map.jpg"

"181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-f.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-a.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-b.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-c.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-d.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-e.jpg"


Melbourne's sewerage scheme

Roderick Smith
 

Roderick.

How Melbourne solved its sewage problem. Mitchell Toy October 2, 2018 Herald Sun
MELBOURNE was booming 50 years after it was founded. Flush with money from the gold rush it was soon to become the biggest city in the British Empire outside of London. But there was one aspect of Melbourne that wasn’t so marvellous.
video: Where Melbourne's laneways came from
FIFTY years after John Batman and the Port Phillip Association founded Melbourne the place was booming.
The population hit 280,000 by 1880 and was well on the way to 500,000 just a decade later.
For a while it was the largest city in the British Empire outside London.
After the gold rush had poured people and money into Victoria, ambitious public works were underway such as the Exhibition Building and the new Princes Bridge.
But there was one aspect of Melbourne that wasn’t so marvellous.
Melbourne in 1880, when the city still did not have a sewer system. Picture: State Library of Victoria
It was the reason our fair city, considered one of the finest in the world, still attracted the nickname “Smellbourne”.
In the fifty years since its inception, as its railway lines and suburbs spread south of Brighton and north of Preston, there still was no underground sewer system.
And if the smell wasn’t bad enough, the onset of typhoid in the late 1800s forced the hand of government to build the Werribee treatment plant.
NIGHT SOIL
Night soil, the euphemism for raw sewage, was a constant menace in Melbourne in the late 1800s.
It flowed through open drains, was dumped in streets or was transported away in large pots from cesspits or tanks.
Waste from kitchens, chamber pots and industrial buildings was poured out into rivers and streams, including the Yarra.
A drawing depicting a camp at the Alfred Hospital to treat sufferers of typhoid in the late 1800s. Picture: State Library of Victoria
A late Nineteenth Century illustration depicting one of the many fever outbreaks in Melbourne. Picture: State Library of Victoria.
Home toilets were not connected to pipes and often had little more than a bucket at their base.
The collection and disposal of the pots was something that continued in Melbourne outhouses well into the 20th Century.
In 1880 the night soil was often carried out to the fringes of the city and used as effective fertiliser.
But the streets of Melbourne were themselves open sewers and the health of waterways was deteriorating rapidly.
The whole business was not only smelly but lethal.
DISEASE OUTBREAKS
Despite the overpowering smell, theories about the spread of disease through germs and the stark danger of open sewers were not widely accepted and the shocking rate of typhoid death and infant mortality was not immediately linked to the squalid streets.
Ubiquitous Australian flies — unfamiliar to many Melbourne residents who were born overseas — helped the disease spread effortlessly among the city’s growing populace.
Disease was ever present. Between 1869 and 1878 typhoid alone had killed an estimated 1100 people climbing to more than 220 per year in the late 1870s.
More outbreaks in the 1880s clogged hospitals and killed hundreds.
Work on the main Melbourne drain in the 1880s. Picture: State Library of Victoria
By 1889 the drainage problem was recognised as a cause of typhoid with a government notice stating that, when a new case was identified, drains in and around the property had to be flushed by an appointed inspector at least once every 24 hours.
Inspectors were to use sulfate of iron or carbolic acid to cleanse the area, in public health instructions never before issued.
New regulations also called for private closets to be aired and disinfected, and the sweeping and cleaning of streets to be more vigorous.
But by now there was no getting around the fact that an underground sewer was well overdue.
An illustration of plans for a new sewer network reaching out to Werribee. Picture: State Library of Victoria
PLANS FOR THE WERRIBEE FARM
Despite the toll of bad hygiene on the public, work on a new sewer system didn’t get underway until the early 1890s.
The freshly founded Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works drew up a drainage system that gathered sewage underground at Spotswood.
From there a pumping station powered by steam would be built to push the waste out to a new sewage farm at Werribee.
An illustration of the new sewage farm at Werribee. Picture: State Library of Victoria
Mordialloc was briefly considered as an alternative site for the treatment plant before land at Werribee was deemed cheaper; the board bought more than 8800 acres from the Chirnside family at a price of 17 pounds per acre.
The project, one of the largest of its kind in colonial Australia, was completed in 1897.
Four years later Melbourne was the capital of a federated Australia and had shaken its reputation for smelly streets.
THE DARK, DEBAUCHED PAST OF OUR LANEWAYS
EARLY MELBOURNE: THE SITES THAT SHAPED OUR CITY
<www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyle/melbourne/how-melbourne-solved-its-sewage-problem/news-story/8c27c9dc62b6cd8b06930ea618c4a53f>
* A lot of human waste still flows into the Yarra and is why swimming in it is a health risk. Its E. coli levels downstream are off the scale.   
* classy bricklaying in the main sewer
* it is hoped that the viaducts will always have heritage protection

"180709M-Melbourne'Age'-sewer.excavation-b.jpg" "180709M-Melbourne'Age'-sewer.excavation-a.jpg" "180709M-Melbourne'Age'-1892Melbourne.sewer.map.jpg" 

"181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-f.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-a.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-b.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-c.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-d.jpg" "181002-Melbourne'HeraldSun'-sewerage-e.jpg"


Re: Cossack (WA)

denis.wasley
 

Just the spot for a new Covid quarantine station

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Hunslet
Sent: Friday, 5 February 2021 9:10 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

So I noticed!   Now, what about a light railway to service the wharf?

Hunslet

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Sewell
Sent: Friday, 5 February 2021 8:51 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

Even has a wharf to make it easier to get landing craft ashore.



Cheers,
Kevin


It's easy looking back at last year - 2020 hindsight.

 

On Fri, 5 Feb 2021, 7:55 pm Hunslet, <hunslet@...> wrote:

Just the site for the Chinese to purchase!

Hunslet.

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Friday, 5 February 2021 4:45 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

Hmm. When I was up that way five years ago I spent two or three days at Karijni, and less than 2-3 hours at Cossack. I don't think they are comparable. 

 

John

 

On Fri, 5 Feb 2021 at 14:06, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:

The photos with the article don't show any aspect of the tramway.

Roderick

WA government is selling 22-hectare ghost town in Pilbara region. LISA CALAUTTI OCT 26, 2020
The ghost town of Cossack, in the Pilbara, is being sold by the WA government. Photo: Supplied
An entire Pilbara township where Western Australia’s pearling industry originated is on the market, with the state government hoping the new owners will breathe new life into the historic ghost town.
Offered for sale for the first time, Cossack, which is about 1480 kilometres north of Perth and a half-hour drive from Karratha, was established in 1863.
The abandoned town, which is on Butchers Inlet at the mouth of the Harding River on the Pilbara Coast, was the first port to be founded in the north west of Australia.
The WA Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage has enlisted LJ Hooker Karratha and LJ Hooker Commercial Perth to conduct a registrations of interest campaign for the 22-hectare site, and they are on the hunt for proposals that will bring social and economic benefits to the state’s north west.
Anna Guillesserok, LJ Hooker Karratha sales executive, said the unique offering had so far generated a large amount of interest from overseas buyers, as well as from Perth tourism businesses.
One of the historic buildings in Cossack, in the Pilbara region of WA. Photo: Supplied
“What makes it rare is that it has so much land around it and raw, natural beauty,” she said.
“I think it’s going to be an excellent site for someone to develop as far as tourism goes. I think it rivals Karijini [National Park] for what it has to offer.”
The department, on behalf of the State of WA, is looking for interest from the private sector to create a new era for Cossack, while preserving its cultural and heritage values, and its natural and built environment. Twelve heritage-listed buildings and Jarman Island are part of the sale.
The Cossack town site precinct and the Jarman Island lighthouse and quarters are on the state register of heritage places.
The statement of significance says the precinct has several buildings constructed of local materials and archaeological sites dating from the 1870s, which have cultural heritage significance due to the fact they contain evidence of the impact of European settlement on Aboriginal communities.
The town of Cossack was one of the first in the Pilbara region, but over the years lost residents to nearby towns, such as Point Sampson and Karratha. Photo: Supplied
The precinct is also noted for the “outstanding figures in the early development of the Pilbara region, including explorer F. T. Gregory, the Padbury, Wellard, Broadhurst, Withnell and Sholl families, and Cossack identities such as the Halls and Muramats”.
During the gold rushes of the late 1880s, new immigrants arrived through Cossack, according to the heritage listing.
“At this time the settlement was linked to Roebourne with the tramway. Despite this, the town was slowly eclipsed by Point Samson, with the establishment of the jetty there,” it stated.
“In the 20th century, activities at Cossack included commerce, as seen at Muramats Store, and the turtle processing enterprise based out of the Customs Building.”
The government is looking for proposals for low-impact tourism ventures such as innovative and high-quality eco-tourism accommodation, camping, cafes and galleries, which will support the regeneration of the town’s under-utilised heritage assets, while also ensuring the long-term conservation and future management of the site.
LJ Hooker Commercial Perth director Vincent Siciliano said Cossack was a pivotal part of WA’s pearling industry.
“But Cossack sits in an amazing pocket of the Pilbara. The townsite is bordered by the azure water of the Harding River,” he said.
“This campaign presents a developer or entity with a rare chance to deliver a vision and ongoing commitment for a low-impact activation of a piece of WA’s history.”
The campaign is open until 2pm on November 20.
<www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/wa-government-is-selling-22-hectare-ghost-town-in-pilbra-region-999186>




Re: Cossack (WA)

Hunslet
 

So I noticed!   Now, what about a light railway to service the wharf?

Hunslet

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin Sewell
Sent: Friday, 5 February 2021 8:51 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

Even has a wharf to make it easier to get landing craft ashore.



Cheers,
Kevin


It's easy looking back at last year - 2020 hindsight.

 

On Fri, 5 Feb 2021, 7:55 pm Hunslet, <hunslet@...> wrote:

Just the site for the Chinese to purchase!

Hunslet.

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Friday, 5 February 2021 4:45 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Cossack (WA)

 

Hmm. When I was up that way five years ago I spent two or three days at Karijni, and less than 2-3 hours at Cossack. I don't think they are comparable. 

 

John

 

On Fri, 5 Feb 2021 at 14:06, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:

The photos with the article don't show any aspect of the tramway.

Roderick

WA government is selling 22-hectare ghost town in Pilbara region. LISA CALAUTTI OCT 26, 2020
The ghost town of Cossack, in the Pilbara, is being sold by the WA government. Photo: Supplied
An entire Pilbara township where Western Australia’s pearling industry originated is on the market, with the state government hoping the new owners will breathe new life into the historic ghost town.
Offered for sale for the first time, Cossack, which is about 1480 kilometres north of Perth and a half-hour drive from Karratha, was established in 1863.
The abandoned town, which is on Butchers Inlet at the mouth of the Harding River on the Pilbara Coast, was the first port to be founded in the north west of Australia.
The WA Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage has enlisted LJ Hooker Karratha and LJ Hooker Commercial Perth to conduct a registrations of interest campaign for the 22-hectare site, and they are on the hunt for proposals that will bring social and economic benefits to the state’s north west.
Anna Guillesserok, LJ Hooker Karratha sales executive, said the unique offering had so far generated a large amount of interest from overseas buyers, as well as from Perth tourism businesses.
One of the historic buildings in Cossack, in the Pilbara region of WA. Photo: Supplied
“What makes it rare is that it has so much land around it and raw, natural beauty,” she said.
“I think it’s going to be an excellent site for someone to develop as far as tourism goes. I think it rivals Karijini [National Park] for what it has to offer.”
The department, on behalf of the State of WA, is looking for interest from the private sector to create a new era for Cossack, while preserving its cultural and heritage values, and its natural and built environment. Twelve heritage-listed buildings and Jarman Island are part of the sale.
The Cossack town site precinct and the Jarman Island lighthouse and quarters are on the state register of heritage places.
The statement of significance says the precinct has several buildings constructed of local materials and archaeological sites dating from the 1870s, which have cultural heritage significance due to the fact they contain evidence of the impact of European settlement on Aboriginal communities.
The town of Cossack was one of the first in the Pilbara region, but over the years lost residents to nearby towns, such as Point Sampson and Karratha. Photo: Supplied
The precinct is also noted for the “outstanding figures in the early development of the Pilbara region, including explorer F. T. Gregory, the Padbury, Wellard, Broadhurst, Withnell and Sholl families, and Cossack identities such as the Halls and Muramats”.
During the gold rushes of the late 1880s, new immigrants arrived through Cossack, according to the heritage listing.
“At this time the settlement was linked to Roebourne with the tramway. Despite this, the town was slowly eclipsed by Point Samson, with the establishment of the jetty there,” it stated.
“In the 20th century, activities at Cossack included commerce, as seen at Muramats Store, and the turtle processing enterprise based out of the Customs Building.”
The government is looking for proposals for low-impact tourism ventures such as innovative and high-quality eco-tourism accommodation, camping, cafes and galleries, which will support the regeneration of the town’s under-utilised heritage assets, while also ensuring the long-term conservation and future management of the site.
LJ Hooker Commercial Perth director Vincent Siciliano said Cossack was a pivotal part of WA’s pearling industry.
“But Cossack sits in an amazing pocket of the Pilbara. The townsite is bordered by the azure water of the Harding River,” he said.
“This campaign presents a developer or entity with a rare chance to deliver a vision and ongoing commitment for a low-impact activation of a piece of WA’s history.”
The campaign is open until 2pm on November 20.
<www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/wa-government-is-selling-22-hectare-ghost-town-in-pilbra-region-999186>




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