Date   

Light Railways 265

John Dennis
 

Light Railways 265 was handed over to Australia Post this morning. It's another a great looking issue The main articles are: Robb & Co’s Cudgen Sugar Operations (Northern Rivers of NSW), the provocatively titled "Does away with tramways!" which has an international feel, comparing Rubicon and Charrning Creek in NZ, and finally "Some unusual skips at Black Jack colliery". Plus, of course, the usual Industrial Railway News, Letters, Field Reports, Heritage & Tourist News, and finishing up with Looking Back, with an interesting couple of photographs of the construction of the dam wall at what is now Eildon Reservoir. 
Members can expect it to begin dropping through their letter boxes shortly, while for those who do not subscribe it will be at newsagents any day now, or available from our online shop at lrrsa.org.au.

John Dennis


John Paff

Petan
 

I have lost John Paff’s email, so John, can you please email me at petanoz@...

 

Usual topic of interest to both of us.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley


Re: 1890s cane trucks

Petan
 

Hi John and everyone,

 

Thanks John for all this lovely help!!!

 

Glad you offered some advice on the Terranora ‘funicular’/ ‘balanced incline’ terminology topic as I have seen a few versions of that in Tweed Museum and CSR records and so will eventually need to settle on a standard term for my LR articles. John Armstrong’s 1976 Tweed ARHS Bulletin article used both funicular and self-acting incline for the Cowan/ Joubert one at Terranora. Caleb Marks was born in NSW South Coast mid 1860s and so trips back to visit family etc meant he was familiar with what he termed in his 1945 memoirs (see following Trove) as the self-acting coal tram at Mount Kiera and then put in what he termed a self-acting (sugar) tram at Terranora. Thomas Fraser asked CSR for ‘Trucks and Wire Rope for Incline’. An 1892 newspaper terms Cowan’s one as Cable Tram. So John, the ‘balanced incline’ term will solve that terminology problem for me!

 

Marks’ 1945 memoirs  https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/194543056   

 

John, you asked if I was sure these bogie trucks had been purchased by CSR for cane haulage? Yes I am sure and I saw that at the end of the handwritten Duranbah Tramway League’s 6 July 1894 letter to cane inspector Dowling. That was the one with Duranbah tramway route details and from CSR’s Tweed ‘Letter Book’ and I emailed that letter to you last year and will send again later today as I now suspect you were in the UK at the time so maybe enjoying that trip. I’ll also email Thomas Fraser’s handwritten letter, also from CSR files, with his comments that the picture I posted to this LRRSA group was from Fowlers Catalogue and was the style of Truck used by Marks and is the design the Terranora farmers preferred. As you wrote John, maybe Fraser was not referring to the trucks being braked when he referred to ‘the style of trucks being used by Marks’, and so it was the wagon construction style Fraser wanted. That makes sense and thanks for the suggestion!

 

Now the question is what the handwritten Duranbah Tramway League’s 6 July 1894 letter meant by the bogie trucks that should suit Mr. C. Marks and the single trucks with brakes now used by him, especially the term bogie and single trucks, where single is written in the context of being opposite to bogie.

 

No locomotives have been identified with the Duranbah line which evidence suggests lasted around 10 years from 1894.

 

John, liked your suggested method of gravitating the loaded trucks down downhill on the brakes and thanks for pointing out braked trucks would most likely have to be crewed to be used effectively.

 

One 1895 Trove describes a Terranora ‘balanced incline’ operation but does not name the farmer  https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/61273803

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Browning
Sent: Saturday, 26 January 2019 9:00 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Dear Peter

 

> Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

Cane trucks with bogies did not see any general use in Australia so must be regarded as unconventional.

Bogie wagons were often used by sugar mills for the transport of bagged raw sugar and large items such as machinery.

Cane trucks with brakes would be used with horse haulage (and potentially for gravitation).

As braked trucks would most likely have to be manned to be used effectively, it would be doubly expensive to purchase them in the first place and then operate them.

The traditional use of sprags where necessary would have generally overcome the absence of brakes in most cases, particularly where locomotives were used.

 

> The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill.

I take it that no locomotives were in use on this line. If it was a continuous down grade and horses were used, it would be tempting to gravitate the loaded trucks down and haul them back with horse power. Brakes would have been advantageous.

 

> Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

I am not sure if ‘funicular’ is the correct term. It usually applies to a cable incline railway with a passenger car permanently attached to each end of the rope and equipped with a powered cable reel, as either car could be the heavier depending on traffic.

I think ‘balanced incline’ might be a better term for the cable inclines at Terranora where the descending loads would usually be heavier than the ascending empty trucks. These inclines would only require braking on the cable reel.

Vehicle brakes are irrelevant to such inclines but could well have been useful if horse haulage was in use on the line beyond the top of the incline.

 

> I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

> The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

As Peter Neve has diplomatically pointed out, the type of truck illustrated has no brakes so if the story is correct, Fraser was not referring to the trucks being braked when he referred to ‘the style of trucks being used by Marks’.

 

> Forgot to mention the bogie trucks originally ordered for Duranbah also had brakes, so the proposed swap was for Duranbah’s bogie trucks with brakes for Caleb Marks’ single trucks, with brakes.

Are you sure that these bogie trucks had been purchased by CSR for cane haulage?

 

Looking forward to seeing the article.

 

John

 


Re: 1890s cane trucks

John Browning
 

Dear Peter

 

> Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

Cane trucks with bogies did not see any general use in Australia so must be regarded as unconventional.

Bogie wagons were often used by sugar mills for the transport of bagged raw sugar and large items such as machinery.

Cane trucks with brakes would be used with horse haulage (and potentially for gravitation).

As braked trucks would most likely have to be manned to be used effectively, it would be doubly expensive to purchase them in the first place and then operate them.

The traditional use of sprags where necessary would have generally overcome the absence of brakes in most cases, particularly where locomotives were used.

 

> The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill.

I take it that no locomotives were in use on this line. If it was a continuous down grade and horses were used, it would be tempting to gravitate the loaded trucks down and haul them back with horse power. Brakes would have been advantageous.

 

> Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

I am not sure if ‘funicular’ is the correct term. It usually applies to a cable incline railway with a passenger car permanently attached to each end of the rope and equipped with a powered cable reel, as either car could be the heavier depending on traffic.

I think ‘balanced incline’ might be a better term for the cable inclines at Terranora where the descending loads would usually be heavier than the ascending empty trucks. These inclines would only require braking on the cable reel.

Vehicle brakes are irrelevant to such inclines but could well have been useful if horse haulage was in use on the line beyond the top of the incline.

 

> I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

> The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

As Peter Neve has diplomatically pointed out, the type of truck illustrated has no brakes so if the story is correct, Fraser was not referring to the trucks being braked when he referred to ‘the style of trucks being used by Marks’.

 

> Forgot to mention the bogie trucks originally ordered for Duranbah also had brakes, so the proposed swap was for Duranbah’s bogie trucks with brakes for Caleb Marks’ single trucks, with brakes.

Are you sure that these bogie trucks had been purchased by CSR for cane haulage?

 

Looking forward to seeing the article.

 

John

 


February LRRSA Meeting details

John Dennis
 

Light Railways 265 is getting close to be sent out to our members.

There are some great topics in the meetings this month, ranging from lime sands tramways on the Eyre Peninsula, to Dams of Sydney and their light railways, on to recent cane tram operations in Bundaberg, and More South Gippsland Tramways. Come along to a meeting and be entertained, educated, and enjoy the camaraderie of like-minded people.

The meeting details for February are here: http://lrrsa.org.au/LRR_Meetings.html

John Dennis


Re: 1890s cane trucks

John Dennis
 

Peter,

That "dodgy" link to the photo might be because you uploaded to the yahoogroup, not to groups.io

John

On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 at 11:37, Petan <yahoomail@...> wrote:

Image of 1890s cane truck from Fowler Catalogue now on my Google Drive as the earlier link to the group’s files is dodgy.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DDe-L2Z0RPF4-BVfwM-TaD4gcnRH5pbb/view

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 9:21 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Forgot to mention the bogie trucks originally ordered for Duranbah also had brakes, so the proposed swap was for Duranbah’s bogie trucks with brakes for Caleb Marks’ single trucks, with brakes.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 8:55 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

 

The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill. Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

 

I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

 

The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

 

I just added a copy of the Fowler Catalogue image, sourced from Fraser’s letter, to this group’s files

https://au.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LRRSA/files/SE%20QLD%20%20or%20NTH%20Rivers%20NSW%20/Fraser%20wagon%20image%20label.jpg

 

Any help gratefully received. My Cudgen Robb & Co tramway article is in the next LR and the Duranbah one for LR is almost done. My other individual Tweed CSR tramway articles for LR,  (Crabbes Creek, Condong area and Terranora etc) are partly done.

 

Thanks

Peter Cokley

 

 

 

 

 


Re: 1890s cane trucks

Hunslet
 

Thanks.   I was under the (mistaken) impression that it was “braked”.

Hunslet.

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 11:37 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Image of 1890s cane truck from Fowler Catalogue now on my Google Drive as the earlier link to the group’s files is dodgy.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DDe-L2Z0RPF4-BVfwM-TaD4gcnRH5pbb/view

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 9:21 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Forgot to mention the bogie trucks originally ordered for Duranbah also had brakes, so the proposed swap was for Duranbah’s bogie trucks with brakes for Caleb Marks’ single trucks, with brakes.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 8:55 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

 

The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill. Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

 

I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

 

The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

 

I just added a copy of the Fowler Catalogue image, sourced from Fraser’s letter, to this group’s files

https://au.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LRRSA/files/SE%20QLD%20%20or%20NTH%20Rivers%20NSW%20/Fraser%20wagon%20image%20label.jpg

 

Any help gratefully received. My Cudgen Robb & Co tramway article is in the next LR and the Duranbah one for LR is almost done. My other individual Tweed CSR tramway articles for LR,  (Crabbes Creek, Condong area and Terranora etc) are partly done.

 

Thanks

Peter Cokley

 

 

 

 

 


Re: 1890s cane trucks

Petan
 

Image of 1890s cane truck from Fowler Catalogue now on my Google Drive as the earlier link to the group’s files is dodgy.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DDe-L2Z0RPF4-BVfwM-TaD4gcnRH5pbb/view

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 9:21 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Forgot to mention the bogie trucks originally ordered for Duranbah also had brakes, so the proposed swap was for Duranbah’s bogie trucks with brakes for Caleb Marks’ single trucks, with brakes.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 8:55 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

 

The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill. Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

 

I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

 

The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

 

I just added a copy of the Fowler Catalogue image, sourced from Fraser’s letter, to this group’s files

https://au.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LRRSA/files/SE%20QLD%20%20or%20NTH%20Rivers%20NSW%20/Fraser%20wagon%20image%20label.jpg

 

Any help gratefully received. My Cudgen Robb & Co tramway article is in the next LR and the Duranbah one for LR is almost done. My other individual Tweed CSR tramway articles for LR,  (Crabbes Creek, Condong area and Terranora etc) are partly done.

 

Thanks

Peter Cokley

 

 

 

 

 


Re: 1890s cane trucks

Petan
 

Forgot to mention the bogie trucks originally ordered for Duranbah also had brakes, so the proposed swap was for Duranbah’s bogie trucks with brakes for Caleb Marks’ single trucks, with brakes.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> On Behalf Of Petan
Sent: Wednesday, 23 January 2019 8:55 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] 1890s cane trucks

 

Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

 

The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill. Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

 

I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

 

The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

 

I just added a copy of the Fowler Catalogue image, sourced from Fraser’s letter, to this group’s files

https://au.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LRRSA/files/SE%20QLD%20%20or%20NTH%20Rivers%20NSW%20/Fraser%20wagon%20image%20label.jpg

 

Any help gratefully received. My Cudgen Robb & Co tramway article is in the next LR and the Duranbah one for LR is almost done. My other individual Tweed CSR tramway articles for LR,  (Crabbes Creek, Condong area and Terranora etc) are partly done.

 

Thanks

Peter Cokley

 

 

 

 

 


1890s cane trucks

Petan
 

Need a bit of background advice please regarding 2 foot gauge 1890s cane trucks and how common was the fitting of brakes and the difference between bogie trucks and what were termed in 1890s as single trucks?

 

The CSR line in question, Duranbah Tweed River, included a 1 in 46 grade for a continuous distance of 94 chains (1891 metres) down ‘alongside’ Cudgen Rd from its junction with Duranbah Rd, then across to the wharf near what is now Tweed Valley Way , formally the Pacific Highway. Then a 11km barge trip to CSR’s Condong sugar mill. Naturally the funiculars mentioned below were also steep, so the question of brakes is of interest. I understand the funiculars also had a brake device on the cable drum gear.

 

I am almost finished preparing an article for LRRSA on the 1890s Duranbah CSR tramway in the Tweed River area. The CSR Tweed Letter Book (6 July 1894) notes the trucks ordered for Duranbah were bogie trucks and Duranbah farmers wanted to swap them with what they termed in their handwritten letter as ‘single trucks, with brakes’, that were used by Caleb Marks who was one of the Terranora funicular cane tramway farmers.

 

The same CSR Letter Book has a letter from another Terranora funicular cane tramway farmer, Thomas Fraser, to Condong mill manager William Isaacs, dated 30 March 1895. The letter included a picture taken from what Fraser described as ‘Fowlers Catalogue’, of the type of wagon Fraser wanted. More to the point, Fraser states it is the style of truck used by Caleb Marks. The Fowler catalogue labelled the wagon as ‘Colonial Type, with bracket ends, load 20 Cwts’.

 

I just added a copy of the Fowler Catalogue image, sourced from Fraser’s letter, to this group’s files

https://au.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LRRSA/files/SE%20QLD%20%20or%20NTH%20Rivers%20NSW%20/Fraser%20wagon%20image%20label.jpg

 

Any help gratefully received. My Cudgen Robb & Co tramway article is in the next LR and the Duranbah one for LR is almost done. My other individual Tweed CSR tramway articles for LR,  (Crabbes Creek, Condong area and Terranora etc) are partly done.

 

Thanks

Peter Cokley

 

 

 

 


Gulflander and Weipa

Phil Rickard
 

Members may well be interested in the latest video from John Phillips, now on YouTube.  Definitely worth a look (as are all John's videos) - includes the rather ancient AEC railmotor.    cheers      Phil Rickard

John's message reads:  
Hello everyone.
                           I have just uploaded my latest YouTube video , this one is on the Gulflander in far north Queensland along with a bonus at the end of a quick look at probably Australia’s most remote railway , Rio Tinto’s Bauxite line at Weipa on the Cape York Peninsula , I have now passed 100 subscriber's (a nice 70th birthday present) so thank you to everyone who has done so .
The link is ,  https://youtu.be/_oUTdcetUVI

cheers


Re: OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

Michael C.
 

No worries.

India next... 😉

Michael Chapman 



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: Ian Pither <ian.pither35@...>
Date: 02/01/2019 07:23 (GMT+00:00)
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

Many Thanks and a fruitful year in your travels.
Ian (Germany)

Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 at 01:24, Michael C. via Groups.Io <chapmanmchapman=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dear all,

Happy New Year from the United Kingdom.

Apologies for being off-topic, but just before Christmas I travelled via train from Leeds in Yorkshire to Hannover in Germany via LNER, Eurostar, Thalys and DB ICE trains, then onto Goslar in the Harz via coach.

Then I spent three days riding and photographing the metre gauge Harzer Schmalspurbahnen (https://www.hsb-wr.de/startseite/).

I was surprised that all the trains were running and shops were open on Christmas day. Therefore I caught a diesel train from Goslar to Wernigerode and travelled by HSB up the Brocken where Christmas lunch was currywurst and beer!

On Christmas night there was a line-up of locomotives in the floodlit yard at Wernigerode so I had a go a night photography - the best ones are now on Flickr. 

Take a look if you are interested.


Cheers,

Michael Chapman.


Re: OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

Michael C.
 

Hi John,

It was two or three in Wernigerode, but minus one at the top of the Brocken. 

It felt much colder though owing to the wind chill and all the ice and snow blowing around.

Michael Chapman 



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: John Dennis <jdennis412@...>
Date: 02/01/2019 01:52 (GMT+00:00)
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

Nice photos Michael,

I've never been there in Winter. I'm not certain whether I prefer Melbourne's high 30s (42 on Friday) or the freezing cold. What was the temperature in Wernigerode? 

John

On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 at 11:24, Michael C. via Groups.Io <chapmanmchapman=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dear all,

Happy New Year from the United Kingdom.

Apologies for being off-topic, but just before Christmas I travelled via train from Leeds in Yorkshire to Hannover in Germany via LNER, Eurostar, Thalys and DB ICE trains, then onto Goslar in the Harz via coach.

Then I spent three days riding and photographing the metre gauge Harzer Schmalspurbahnen (https://www.hsb-wr.de/startseite/).

I was surprised that all the trains were running and shops were open on Christmas day. Therefore I caught a diesel train from Goslar to Wernigerode and travelled by HSB up the Brocken where Christmas lunch was currywurst and beer!

On Christmas night there was a line-up of locomotives in the floodlit yard at Wernigerode so I had a go a night photography - the best ones are now on Flickr. 

Take a look if you are interested.


Cheers,

Michael Chapman.


Re: OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

Ian Pither <ian.pither35@...>
 

Many Thanks and a fruitful year in your travels.
Ian (Germany)

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 at 01:24, Michael C. via Groups.Io <chapmanmchapman=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dear all,

Happy New Year from the United Kingdom.

Apologies for being off-topic, but just before Christmas I travelled via train from Leeds in Yorkshire to Hannover in Germany via LNER, Eurostar, Thalys and DB ICE trains, then onto Goslar in the Harz via coach.

Then I spent three days riding and photographing the metre gauge Harzer Schmalspurbahnen (https://www.hsb-wr.de/startseite/).

I was surprised that all the trains were running and shops were open on Christmas day. Therefore I caught a diesel train from Goslar to Wernigerode and travelled by HSB up the Brocken where Christmas lunch was currywurst and beer!

On Christmas night there was a line-up of locomotives in the floodlit yard at Wernigerode so I had a go a night photography - the best ones are now on Flickr. 

Take a look if you are interested.


Cheers,

Michael Chapman.


Re: OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

John Dennis
 

Nice photos Michael,

I've never been there in Winter. I'm not certain whether I prefer Melbourne's high 30s (42 on Friday) or the freezing cold. What was the temperature in Wernigerode? 

John

On Wed, 2 Jan 2019 at 11:24, Michael C. via Groups.Io <chapmanmchapman=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dear all,

Happy New Year from the United Kingdom.

Apologies for being off-topic, but just before Christmas I travelled via train from Leeds in Yorkshire to Hannover in Germany via LNER, Eurostar, Thalys and DB ICE trains, then onto Goslar in the Harz via coach.

Then I spent three days riding and photographing the metre gauge Harzer Schmalspurbahnen (https://www.hsb-wr.de/startseite/).

I was surprised that all the trains were running and shops were open on Christmas day. Therefore I caught a diesel train from Goslar to Wernigerode and travelled by HSB up the Brocken where Christmas lunch was currywurst and beer!

On Christmas night there was a line-up of locomotives in the floodlit yard at Wernigerode so I had a go a night photography - the best ones are now on Flickr. 

Take a look if you are interested.


Cheers,

Michael Chapman.


OFF-TOPIC. Photographs from Christmas in Germany

Michael C.
 

Dear all,

Happy New Year from the United Kingdom.

Apologies for being off-topic, but just before Christmas I travelled via train from Leeds in Yorkshire to Hannover in Germany via LNER, Eurostar, Thalys and DB ICE trains, then onto Goslar in the Harz via coach.

Then I spent three days riding and photographing the metre gauge Harzer Schmalspurbahnen (https://www.hsb-wr.de/startseite/).

I was surprised that all the trains were running and shops were open on Christmas day. Therefore I caught a diesel train from Goslar to Wernigerode and travelled by HSB up the Brocken where Christmas lunch was currywurst and beer!

On Christmas night there was a line-up of locomotives in the floodlit yard at Wernigerode so I had a go a night photography - the best ones are now on Flickr. 

Take a look if you are interested.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157705193667704

Cheers,

Michael Chapman.


Re: vale Noel Reed (b1931 - 19 Dec 2018)

Terence Boardman <outlook_784290998235FD5E@...>
 

 

Funeral Arrangements for Noel F Reed (from SMH)

REED, Noel Francis 25.12.1930 - 19.12.2018

Much loved husband of Doreen. Dearly loved father and father-in-law of Jenni & David and Sue & Roger. Loved Pa to Sean, Aimee, Jade, Tom, Ben, Tim, Hannah and Sarah and Great-Pa to Grace.

A service for Noel will be held in the Camellia Chapel of Macquarie Park Crematorium on Thursday 27th December 2018 at 11.30am.

 

 

Terry

Terence Boardman OAM

E: terry.boa@...

P:  02 9939 8297 from Australia

P: 61 2 9939 8297 from overseas

M: 0421 077 747 from Australia

M: 61 421 077 747 from overseas

Unit 201 Catalinas

168 Queenscliff Road

Queenscliff NSW 2096

Australia

FaceBook: Terry Boardman

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: vale Noel Reed (b1931 - 19 Dec 2018)

Roderick Smith
 

REED, Noel Francis.
25.12.1930 - 19.12.2018.
Much loved husband of Doreen. Dearly loved father and father-in-law of Jenni & David and Sue & Roger. Loved Pa to Sean, Aimee, Jade, Tom, Ben, Tim, Hannah and Sarah and Great-Pa to Grace.
A service for Noel will be held in the Camellia Chapel of Macquarie Park Crematorium on Thursday 27th December 2018 at 11.30am.
Hamilton Funerals 9449 5544.
Published in The Sydney Morning Herald on Dec. 22, 2018.


Re: vale Noel Reed (b1931 - 19 Dec 2018)

Eddie Oliver
 

On 22/12/2018 12:18, Petan wrote:

Sydney Tramway Museum’s Facebook is reporting our LRRSA yahoogroup member Noel Reed has passed on.

"DEPOT ONLY” - vale Noel Reed (b1931 - 19 Dec 2018)

 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/SydneyTramwayMuseum/posts/?ref=page_internal


Tragic news. Noel contributed an incredible amount to the recording and analysis of railway/tramway history as well as being a major figure in signalling matters. His willingness to share information  and resources was legendary, and a lot of people owe huge gratitude to him.




vale Noel Reed (b1931 - 19 Dec 2018)

Petan
 

Sydney Tramway Museum’s Facebook is reporting our LRRSA yahoogroup member Noel Reed has passed on.

"DEPOT ONLY” - vale Noel Reed (b1931 - 19 Dec 2018)

 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/SydneyTramwayMuseum/posts/?ref=page_internal

 

Peter Cokley

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