Date   

Re: Hunslet 1215 / 303

BM
 

Michael,

Wow! You certainly had an amazing day out at the ‘Tracks to Trenches’ event with such an amazing collection of locomotives and other WWI items.

 

I retired as editor of Australian Railway History in late May, so am currently focusing my efforts on my autobiography of my career in international development assistance activities, plus a book on my involvement in railway magazines and railway heritage. Both are major projects!

 

Best Wishes

Bob McKillop

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael C. via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, 16 July 2018 7:57 AM
To: lrrsa@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] Hunslet 1215 / 303

 

Dear all,

 

Me again... Apologies once again in advance for filling your inboxes with off-topic emails.

 

This weekend saw the popular 'Tracks to the Trenches' event held by the Moseley Railway Trust http://mrt.org.uk/

 

Please visit: http://www.ww1-event.org/

 

The event saw the official launch of War Department Light Railway Hunslet 1215 / 303 whci I am sure will be familiar to you in Australia.

 

I have uploaded a collection of images to Flickr.

 

Please take a look if you are interested: https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157671215769618

 

I also met John Browning which was pleasure and a surprise! 

 

Cheers,

 

Michael Chapman


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Re: Hunslet 1215 / 303

John Browning
 

Thanks Michael

The pleasure was mutual.

The wording of that Decauville “builder’s plate” defies imagination.

John


Hunslet 1215 / 303

Michael C.
 

Dear all,

Me again... Apologies once again in advance for filling your inboxes with off-topic emails.

This weekend saw the popular 'Tracks to the Trenches' event held by the Moseley Railway Trust http://mrt.org.uk/

Please visit: http://www.ww1-event.org/

The event saw the official launch of War Department Light Railway Hunslet 1215 / 303 whci I am sure will be familiar to you in Australia.

I have uploaded a collection of images to Flickr.

Please take a look if you are interested: https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157671215769618

I also met John Browning which was pleasure and a surprise! 

Cheers,

Michael Chapman


Re: Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

Chris Stratton
 

Thanks.

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Thursday, 12 July 2018 9:58 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

 

It's VR-speak for level crossing, Chris.

 

John

 

On 12 July 2018 at 21:17, Chris Stratton <gm4201@...> wrote:

What is a PCR?

 

Regards,

Chris

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Thornton via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, 12 July 2018 5:22 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

 

G'day,

"This duct, in Spotswood, was built as a key upgrade to Melbourne’s first sewer system around 1930. It was made by unskilled workmen who dug into the city's swamp with spades and dodged deadly methane explosions."

Ah, yes, a VR gang came close to shading their knickers whilst repairing the PCR at Hall St in Spotswood - they accidentally broke through into this sewer line releasing a large amount of rather odorous, er, flammable gas....  As I recall, this PCR is actually a bridge due to the presence of the sewer.

And, maybe they were were unskilled in the 30's, but the old guys in the 1890's certainly weren't, my g'grandad was in that lot, a highly skilled chippie - if he had to match a piece of fancy milled timber, he hand made the planes to do it, unskilled, humph....

cheers,

Bob Thornton
Skipton AU

 


Photos taken on the construction of the Perth MetroRail City Project

Philip G Graham
 
Edited

An appeal - please can you help?

During the life of the construction phase 10/05~9/06 of the Perth MetroRail City Project, Public Transport Authority, Perth WA AU, Package F, Esplanade~Perth Yard - LCKG= Leighton Contractors/Kumagi Gumi Co Ltd jv (C), there were a number of specialized tours by engineering types and public officials to view progress of the project. Lucky sods, no such luck for the few enthusiasts interested in these proceedings, and it was a bit dicey besides to visit considering various industrial troubles.

During the early part of the first drive from Esplanade station box towards the William Street station box, someone was able to photograph the Schöma CFL180DCL tunnel locomotives at work. The LRRSA has a sequence of these photos, by whom photographed it is not known. Can anybody recognize these photos please, and make known the photographer's name and where we can get in touch? You might recognize the number sequence from your digital camera? DSCF9559-DSCF9572, would be taken sometime late 2005.



Thanks for any help you can render.

-PGG-


OFF TOPIC - American photographs

Michael C.
 

Dear all,

Apologies in advance for filling your inboxes with off-topic emails again...

I have recently returned from the state of Maine in America; whilst there I visited four two-foot gauge railways / railroads. I have uploaded 'some' photographs to Flickr:

Boothbay Railway Village
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157696799429101
So far I have only uploaded the railway photos - they had an amazing collection of cars and a room with a collection of out-board motors - there were hundreds!

An encounter with a box van on the quay side in Wiscasset
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157692695485290
This album also contains two shots of a stealth destroyer in dock for repair.

Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum (diesel hauled)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157698493343475

Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum (steam hauled)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157692733476490

Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington Railway 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157668649379077

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157670730847248
There are some amazing views of the scenery and the lakes at the end. I dipped my feet in the lake - crossed of the bucket list!

And I was so impressed with the Bridgton & Saco River Railroad Baldwin number 7 at the MNGRR the loco has it's own album at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/55958391@N07/albums/72157698988807355

Take a look if you are interested.

Cheers,

Michael Chapman


Re: Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

David Halfpenny
 


On 12 Jul 2018, at 12:58, John Dennis <jdennis412@...> wrote:

It's VR-speak for level crossing, Chris.

John

On 12 July 2018 at 21:17, Chris Stratton <gm4201@...> wrote:

What is a PCR?

Too many TLAs in this business :-)

David 1/2d
Fellow of the PWI

(Three Letter Acronym      Permanent Way Institution)




Re: Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

John Dennis
 

It's VR-speak for level crossing, Chris.

John

On 12 July 2018 at 21:17, Chris Stratton <gm4201@...> wrote:

What is a PCR?

 

Regards,

Chris

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Thornton via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, 12 July 2018 5:22 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

 

G'day,

"This duct, in Spotswood, was built as a key upgrade to Melbourne’s first sewer system around 1930. It was made by unskilled workmen who dug into the city's swamp with spades and dodged deadly methane explosions."

Ah, yes, a VR gang came close to shading their knickers whilst repairing the PCR at Hall St in Spotswood - they accidentally broke through into this sewer line releasing a large amount of rather odorous, er, flammable gas....  As I recall, this PCR is actually a bridge due to the presence of the sewer.

And, maybe they were were unskilled in the 30's, but the old guys in the 1890's certainly weren't, my g'grandad was in that lot, a highly skilled chippie - if he had to match a piece of fancy milled timber, he hand made the planes to do it, unskilled, humph....

cheers,

Bob Thornton
Skipton AU



Re: Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

Chris Stratton
 

What is a PCR?

 

Regards,

Chris

 

From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Thornton via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, 12 July 2018 5:22 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

 

G'day,

"This duct, in Spotswood, was built as a key upgrade to Melbourne’s first sewer system around 1930. It was made by unskilled workmen who dug into the city's swamp with spades and dodged deadly methane explosions."

Ah, yes, a VR gang came close to shading their knickers whilst repairing the PCR at Hall St in Spotswood - they accidentally broke through into this sewer line releasing a large amount of rather odorous, er, flammable gas....  As I recall, this PCR is actually a bridge due to the presence of the sewer.

And, maybe they were were unskilled in the 30's, but the old guys in the 1890's certainly weren't, my g'grandad was in that lot, a highly skilled chippie - if he had to match a piece of fancy milled timber, he hand made the planes to do it, unskilled, humph....

cheers,

Bob Thornton
Skipton AU


LRRSA Meetings for August

John Dennis
 

The August issue of Light Railways is a week away from being dispatched. Here are the meeting details for the different branches for August:

Brisbane
Nambour Steam
Bob Gough will show DVD's from Nambour betweeen1997 and 2000 including steam with ANGRMS BF No. 5 hauling sugar cane up Howard Street and empties to the Howard Street yard.
Location: BCC Library, 107 Orange Grove Road, Coopers Plains.
Date: Friday 17 August 2018 at 7:30pm

Sydney
The oil shale industry at Murrurundi, NSW
The British-Australian Oil Company operated an oil shale refinery at Murrurundi, connected to the NSWGR by a short branch line leaving the main line near Temple Court station. Oil shale was brought to the works from the shale mine at Temi, several miles to the north, by an aerial ropeway. Noted author Mark Langdon has extensively researched and published about this interesting subject. His presentation will summarize the history and illustrate the then-and-now of this once busy industrial centre. Location: Woodstock Community Centre, Church St, Burwood. Free Council car park behind the building (entry via Fitzroy St) or adjacent street parking. Only 10 minutes easy walk from Burwood railway station.
Date: Wednesday, 22 August 2018 at 7:30pm

Melbourne
AGM and from the Ray Graf collection - part 3
Following the Annual General Meeting, a range of colour slides will be shown utilising our vintage steam-powered slide projector (celebrating its 42nd birthday). The slides will cover an eclectic mix of locations both within Victoria and southern NSW). Included will be a number of tunnelling, tourist and industrial operations, now all long-gone.
Location: Ashburton Uniting Church Hall, Ashburn Grove, Ashburton.
Date: Thursday 9 August 2018 at 8:00 pm
Adelaide

More of The Beechy
We will discuss the Beechy in Victoria in 1959 again for another view. including what should have been shown at the last meeting. News of light rail matters will be welcome from any member.
Intending participants would be well advised to contact Les Howard on 8278 3082 or by email fhoward@..., since accommodation is limited.
Location: 1 Kindergarten Drive, Hawthorndene
Date: Thursday 2 August 2018 at 7:30 pm


Re: Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

Bob Thornton
 

G'day,

"This duct, in Spotswood, was built as a key upgrade to Melbourne’s first sewer system around 1930. It was made by unskilled workmen who dug into the city's swamp with spades and dodged deadly methane explosions."

Ah, yes, a VR gang came close to shading their knickers whilst repairing the PCR at Hall St in Spotswood - they accidentally broke through into this sewer line releasing a large amount of rather odorous, er, flammable gas....  As I recall, this PCR is actually a bridge due to the presence of the sewer.

And, maybe they were were unskilled in the 30's, but the old guys in the 1890's certainly weren't, my g'grandad was in that lot, a highly skilled chippie - if he had to match a piece of fancy milled timber, he hand made the planes to do it, unskilled, humph....

cheers,

Bob Thornton
Skipton AU


Melbourne sewer construction, 1890s

Roderick Smith
 

'It’s incredible': The old engineering wonder buried beneath Melbourne 9 July 2018.

The crane groans and shudders as it hauls up the cage from the depths of a deep black hole not far from the banks of the Yarra River.

Eventually, the grimy faces of workmen appear.

"What does it smell like?" one of the onlookers gathered around edge of the hole asks.

"Like shit," they reply together.

Workers are excavating one of Melbourne's first ever sewerage systems. Pictured are Brad Newman and Shane Newman from John Holland KBR. Photo: Darrian Traynor Spotlights are pushed over the edges of the huge manhole, providing a view of the depths.

The light plays off brick walls which are stained black. Small pipes jut out of the walls on all sides, adding their trickles to the flood of human waste that rushes like a river 13 metres below.

This duct, in Spotswood, was built as a key upgrade to Melbourne’s first sewer system around 1930. It was made by unskilled workmen who dug into the city's swamp with spades and dodged deadly methane explosions.

It has performed flawlessly for the last century. When maintenance workers chain-sawed it open last month they discovered it was in almost-perfect condition.

"It’s incredible. It’s a marvel of engineering," says Tom Ryan, who manages the project for Melbourne Water.

A 1892 map of Melbourne's sewers. Most of the infrastructure remains in place. Photo: Melbourne Water / Supplied.

Modern Melbourne’s skyscrapers are built on an old engineering wonder, buried deep in the soil. More than 400 kilometres of pipe, much of it built by hand more than 100 years ago, sits under the surface, connecting millions of homes.

Before it was built, Melburnians had no choice but to dump their raw sewage in the streets, and the city was choked with lethal typhoid.

This image, taken sometime between 1893 and 1897 of a sewer pipe nearby, shows the original brick construction methods. Photo: Melbourne Water / Supplied But sometimes the old ways are better. In the 1960s, sewer construction methods changed from brick to modern concrete. "We found ironically the earlier sewers built in brick are standing up better than the later ones built in concrete," says Mr Ryan.

And the pipes were built with heaps of extra capacity, so despite Melbourne’s population growing from perhaps half a million to 4.9 million, producing about 900 million litres of excrement a day, the sewers are far from choked.

In fact, this duct has only been opened so crews can inspect and reline the channels with plastic pipe to protect them from any future damage. It's part of a huge Melbourne Water project to reline more than 100 kilometres of the city's sewers.

This image shows the 12-tonne gates - known as penstocks - and below, the rushing torrent of sewerage. Photo: Darrian Traynor About 20 per cent of the city’s sewage flows through this 13-metre black hole. Back when it was built, huge steam engines would have been connected here to move the 12-tonne steel sewer gates that control flow.

But that system fell apart years ago and now they are permanently locked open.

The workers will cut them out with a super-high-pressure 'water laser' before removing them.

Building a sewer network by hand and steam-power was a dirty, dangerous job.  Photo: Melbourne Water / Supplied When this duct was built, the workmen managed to blow one of the huge gates right off. Bacteria love sewers, consuming faeces and releasing methane and other flammable gases. "They had no gas detectors back in the day, and they did not fully understand the consequences of these gases," says Mr Ryan.

video: The sewerage pump built to last

Sydney's first electric sewerage pump station is 115 years old and still servicing the city.

Methane apparently built up behind one of the gates, and a naked flame – a candle, maybe – ignited it, blowing the 12-tonne gate right off. Miraculously, nobody was hurt.

After the lining is done, the workmen will close up the duct again.

All going as it should, they won’t need to open it again for another 100 years.

<www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/it-s-incredible-the-old-engineering-wonder-buried-beneath-melbourne-20180706-p4zpuo.html>

* And some in this country would have you believe that the expense undertaken to creat this marvel is little more than intergenerational theft.

* Amazing. Looks similar to those built in Paris and London, but we hear less of our sewage system, even though it is a great engineering feat.

* Once we had Governments and organisations like the Board of Works that actually planed for the future. Today leadership in Victoria and Asutralia is rife with mediocrity. Could not plan the proverbial booze up in a brewery. Soon we will  be faced with elections where we will be asked to select which group of mediocre candidates we want to run Victoria and Australia further into the ground.

* Back in those days, things were built to work, and built to work long into the future; cost was secondary. These days, cost is primary; things are built to the bare minimum standard that will work, and only for as long as any mandated warranty.

* The longevity of Melbourne's sewers is pretty good, but remember that the mother of all sewers, Rome's cloaca maxima, is still going strong after more than 2000 years! Now that is future proofing.

* A reminder of the enormous benefits to human health and welfare that have been brought to us by engineering.

* Is this the work that's being done along Douglas Pde Newport/Willi. for the past few months?

* Amazing foresight! We can't even build a freeway these days without it being choked to the sh*t after 5 years.

* Back in the day engineering works were built to LAST unlike today build / demolish / build / demolish all for profit greed and political point scoring.

[LRRSA 'Light Railways' has had a good article on the railways used to support the original construction.  In later years, railways were used for the construction of new main-trunk sewers, with depots at East Malvern and Laverton].


Seaworld monorail running

Petan
 

The Gold Coast Seaworld monorail was observed running around lunch time today, including the track over the southern public car park. We were in the park near the Southport pool across the Broadwater so it looked approx to be around 8 cars / units plus cabs at each end.  Cheers Peter Cokley

 

 


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

Sam Laybutt
 

Fantastic find - thanks Bob.




From: LRRSA@groups.io <LRRSA@groups.io> on behalf of Bob Thornton via Groups.Io <rjt_46@...>
Sent: Sunday, 8 July 2018 8:42 AM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin
 
G'day,

google is pretty handy, try...
http://www.acant.org.au/Articles/HMASBrisbane2.html
for some nice clear pix... :)

cheers,
Bob Thornton
Skipton AU
_.


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

Bob Thornton
 

G'day,

google is pretty handy, try...
http://www.acant.org.au/Articles/HMASBrisbane2.html
for some nice clear pix... :)

cheers,
Bob Thornton
Skipton AU


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

Stuart Livesey
 

Sorry John - by "they" I meant the NT Library.

Stuart


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

John Browning
 

“Decauville” was a term used by the British military to describe light 2ft gauge railways, often using prefabricated track sections. This is surely what is intended here.

It might be worth checking out photos at the NT Library to see if there are others that provide more information on the site. Otherwise the Australian Archives may contain some details.

John

 


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

John Dennis
 

Putting the photos online remains in the LRRSA "to do" list.

John


sent from my Sony Xperia


On Sat, 7 Jul 2018, 4:13 PM Stuart Livesey <copytext@...> wrote:
If this horrible link works 

http://www.lrrsa.org.au/Light%20railway%20locations%20in%20South%20Australia%20NT%20and%20Broken%20Hill%2031Dec2015.pdf

you will find some reference to the tramway on page 17 and 18 and there is also a reference to a photo held by the Northern Territory Library.

When I was talking to them this time last year they were in the process of putting their image collection online so you may be able to use that reference to find the the photo.

Stuart


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

Stuart Livesey
 

If this horrible link works 

http://www.lrrsa.org.au/Light%20railway%20locations%20in%20South%20Australia%20NT%20and%20Broken%20Hill%2031Dec2015.pdf

you will find some reference to the tramway on page 17 and 18 and there is also a reference to a photo held by the Northern Territory Library.

When I was talking to them this time last year they were in the process of putting their image collection online so you may be able to use that reference to find the the photo.

Stuart


Re: 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin

Mike Bickford
 

Sam,
 
Could ‘Deanville’ be a miss-spelling of ‘Decauville’?
Decauville was a French company that developed a lightweight portable rail system and the name became a generic name for such systems.
 
Regards
 
Mike Bickford
Murrumburrah NSW
 
 

From: Sam Laybutt
Sent: Friday, July 6, 2018 11:26 PM
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: [LRRSA] 'Deanville Tramway' at East Point, Darwin
 

There is an interpretive sign at East Point in Darwin which references a 'Deanville' tramway used to transport ammunition between the magazine and the WW2 gun emplacements. I have attached a photo of this sign.

 

What is a 'Deanville' tramway? Google didn't really help me in this regard.

 

Also, despite what the sign says, i didn't see any tramway remnants. Will have to have a closer look next time I'm there.


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