Date   
Bundaberg

Petan
 

Two from Bundaberg 1967 plus a Tweed question please. My father visited Bundaberg  on a work trip in 1967 and spotted a chopper harvester plus a mechanical long stalk loading onto a wagon. Rails under wagons not obvious but could be hidden by the stalks? I am only posting low resolutions and higher resolution available.


The third is from a slide a mate I have not seen for years gave me c1972 and shows 2 x 44 class NSWGR plus a guards can on the **maybe **Condong line which is the location on which I would like confirmation please? Could the background be sugar? If so than maybe Condong as I don't know of any other possible location with sugar. If wheat or corn etc, than the possibilities are endless. The  1968 WTT availability list for the Condong extension included the mainline 44 class diesel electric locomotive. Bulk sugar was trucked to CSR refinery in New Farm Brisbane by the 44 class era as I have a 1956 image of that but Condong had molasses tank loaders so maybe molasses? 


Cane loader 1967 Bundaberg    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lnzzsVm_MXdJ8MkTQ0crBnoBO38qLWfx/view 


Cane harvester 1967 Bundaberg https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_LGAfb50fSnLRR6LuKIYdWm4vN-UPyXn/view


2 x 44 class maybe Tweed Condong    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xUFCt85Kxeowk0jqwcbG6UggyuG6BGFP/view 


Cheers

Peter Cokley



Re: : An introduction and a question

Philip G Graham
 

My first thought was where would you obtain this type of equipment without the considerable financial outlay of building new gear from scratch?

I guess a lot would hinge on the life of project, value of the items mined, and so on.

In recent times I have been doing research into the rail equipment and locomotives that have been used with Tunnel Boring Machines. Currently there is not much of this equipment remaining in this country from recent projects, the equipment usually being imported, used and then re-exported during the relatively short lives of these types of projects. But a lot of the mucking out wagons would probably also suit use outside of tunnels in the great outdoors. There is a good range of mining and tunneling locomotives of various powers.

It may require importing second-hand, refurbished equipment from overseas. I have at least one company in mind that could offer this equipment, and I have no doubt that they would be willing to come up with investigations and quotations.

Happy to pass on the info.

-PGG- Tasmania

Re: Richmond River tram 1890

John Browning
 

Mount Galena – Deepwater Tramway

“like many another mining project, the great venture ended with a survey of the route.”

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article178273063

 

John

 

Re: An introduction and a question

Eddie Oliver
 

On 02.02.2018 00:53, 'Steve O'Dea' natsteve@... [LRRSA] wrote:

This brings me to a question on light rail; the answer to the haulage
question should be "a light rail system" - specifically it should be
low cost, low speed, simple (no turning - tram one way then reverse
back) and efficient. Until finding this forum I had not, however, been
able to find anyone knowledgeable on this topic. I have spoken to a
couple of railway engineering companies but they can only think about
traditional railways designed and engineered to last forever and
costing a large fortune to construct. Is there someone on here who can
advise on a simple and inexpensive light rail system?
4000 tonnes per day and associated empty movements over 60 km may be a challenge for any 'light' system. Are you basically thinking of trucks on rails?

Re: An introduction and a question

Steve O'Dea
 

Hi Peter,

 

Thanks for the welcome!

 

The photo shows Nanine railway station 37km SSW of Meekatharra.  It isn’t actually part of the link I would like to construct but was the most representative photo I had on my computer last night.  I’ll take some more photos of the actual location over the weekend.

 

Cheers,

Steve

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Friday, 2 February 2018 6:18 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] An introduction and a question

 

 

G’day Steve,

Welcome aboard, I trust you will find the chit-chat of interest and of course useful.

I’ll leave it to the “experts” (drips under pressure!) to comment more fully on your question, but may I just say that it is pleasing to find an engineer willing to think outside the square and to at least consider that there could be other viable possibilities.   Any alternatives could also depend on the anticipated life of your proposed mine.

You don’t indicate where your photo was taken – could I suggest Marble Bar?!

Cheers,

Peter Neve

Junee NSW

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Friday, 2 February 2018 12:54 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] An introduction and a question

 

 

Hi LRRSA,

 

I’m a mining engineer and was taught about rail systems at uni… used them underground in a few old mines (and one new one)… was fascinated by the ABT railway on the west coast of Tasmania… and am increasingly looking at historic as well as current systems to find the most appropriate solution to a given project.  

 

I am currently working on a mining project in WA where we need to haul a modest amount of ore a modest distance (one and a half million tonnes per annum just under 60km of essentially flat terrain).  Naturally the standard answer to this is off highway trucks (either road trains or haul trucks) running on a dedicated haul road.

 

This brings me to a question on light rail; the answer to the haulage question should be “a light rail system” – specifically it should be low cost, low speed, simple (no turning – tram one way then reverse back) and efficient.  Until finding this forum I had not, however, been able to find anyone knowledgeable on this topic.  I have spoken to a couple of railway engineering companies but they can only think about traditional railways designed and engineered to last forever and costing a large fortune to construct.  Is there someone on here who can advise on a simple and inexpensive light rail system?

 

Rail used to be here… the foundation and ballast is still in place in many places and could potentially be utilised in the new system.

 

Look forward to your thoughts!!

 

 

Many thanks,

Steve

0400 848 128

 

 

 

Re: An introduction and a question

Hunslet
 

G’day Steve,

Welcome aboard, I trust you will find the chit-chat of interest and of course useful.

I’ll leave it to the “experts” (drips under pressure!) to comment more fully on your question, but may I just say that it is pleasing to find an engineer willing to think outside the square and to at least consider that there could be other viable possibilities.   Any alternatives could also depend on the anticipated life of your proposed mine.

You don’t indicate where your photo was taken – could I suggest Marble Bar?!

Cheers,

Peter Neve

Junee NSW

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Friday, 2 February 2018 12:54 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] An introduction and a question

 

 

Hi LRRSA,

 

I’m a mining engineer and was taught about rail systems at uni… used them underground in a few old mines (and one new one)… was fascinated by the ABT railway on the west coast of Tasmania… and am increasingly looking at historic as well as current systems to find the most appropriate solution to a given project.  

 

I am currently working on a mining project in WA where we need to haul a modest amount of ore a modest distance (one and a half million tonnes per annum just under 60km of essentially flat terrain).  Naturally the standard answer to this is off highway trucks (either road trains or haul trucks) running on a dedicated haul road.

 

This brings me to a question on light rail; the answer to the haulage question should be “a light rail system” – specifically it should be low cost, low speed, simple (no turning – tram one way then reverse back) and efficient.  Until finding this forum I had not, however, been able to find anyone knowledgeable on this topic.  I have spoken to a couple of railway engineering companies but they can only think about traditional railways designed and engineered to last forever and costing a large fortune to construct.  Is there someone on here who can advise on a simple and inexpensive light rail system?

 

Rail used to be here… the foundation and ballast is still in place in many places and could potentially be utilised in the new system.

 

Look forward to your thoughts!!

 

 

Many thanks,

Steve

0400 848 128

 

 

 

An introduction and a question

Steve O'Dea
 

Hi LRRSA,

 

I’m a mining engineer and was taught about rail systems at uni… used them underground in a few old mines (and one new one)… was fascinated by the ABT railway on the west coast of Tasmania… and am increasingly looking at historic as well as current systems to find the most appropriate solution to a given project.  

 

I am currently working on a mining project in WA where we need to haul a modest amount of ore a modest distance (one and a half million tonnes per annum just under 60km of essentially flat terrain).  Naturally the standard answer to this is off highway trucks (either road trains or haul trucks) running on a dedicated haul road.

 

This brings me to a question on light rail; the answer to the haulage question should be “a light rail system” – specifically it should be low cost, low speed, simple (no turning – tram one way then reverse back) and efficient.  Until finding this forum I had not, however, been able to find anyone knowledgeable on this topic.  I have spoken to a couple of railway engineering companies but they can only think about traditional railways designed and engineered to last forever and costing a large fortune to construct.  Is there someone on here who can advise on a simple and inexpensive light rail system?

 

Rail used to be here… the foundation and ballast is still in place in many places and could potentially be utilised in the new system.

 

Look forward to your thoughts!!

 

 

Many thanks,

Steve

0400 848 128

 

 

 

Mapping former railroads in the USA

John Cleverdon <johnc@...>
 

Hello all,
I came across the article at: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/mapping-ghostly-traces-abandoned-railroads-interactive-crowdsourced-atlas via one of the professional email lists I'm on.
This could be of interest to those recording routes of former rail lines?
The website at: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=1Q91IBeZLh916Q5auDaQ9-x25vh0&ll=39.59430285288446%2C-75.74770424999997&z=13 is primarily USA but when panning to Australia, I note a small number of former lines shown.

There is also the website at: http://www.abandonedrails.com/ (again, USA only?)

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/
LinkedIn: http://au.linkedin.com/pub/john-cleverdon/a/a81/2b


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Richmond River tram 1890

Petan
 

Maybe of interest for Richmond River researchers. Do a text search for tram.

 

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/112943847

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

Re: Raminea Tas

Tony Coen
 

Yes, Peter, it was an excellent programme and narrated by the best of radio and television personalities, Chris. Wisbey. He is also a keen railway and shipping enthusiast and often broadcasts unsolicited plugs for new railway projects in Tasmania on ABC Radio. He additionally assisted in some of the work and movements of May Queen (as seen in the telecast). I have fond memories of the Raminea Mill in operation with its Tangye engine working away whilst half buried in sawdust. The milled timber was taken by trolley across the main road and onto the wharf for loading into May Queen. Trevor Tuttle was her last skipper, and I don’t recall his name being mentioned in the documentary, but he appeared in the films on many occasions.
 
Cheers,
 
    Tony Coen.
 

Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2018 7:14 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Raminea Tas
 
 

Sending attempt No.2 and my earlier email with this from yesterday may eventually appear.

 

Some may have seen the ‘Wake of the May Queen’ on ABC Television on Friday night. Those who did and also remembered what was in LR 253  February 2017 as well as 258 December 2017, would have had a pleasant evening! An honourable mention was accorded to the Raminea sawmill tramway, Port Esperance and the firm of Chesterman and Co, as well as a present day member of that Chesterman family. The Raminea Mill’s Caterpillar D7 frame from LR 253  February 2017, was also briefly on screen. The “May Queen’ was the ketch that transported the sawmill product to Hobart and was the subject of this documentary.

 

Maybe try iVIEW or similar.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 


Raminea Tas

Petan
 

Sending attempt No.2 and my earlier email with this from yesterday may eventually appear.


Some may have seen the ‘Wake of the May Queen’ on ABC Television on Friday night. Those who did and also remembered what was in LR 253  February 2017 as well as 258 December 2017, would have had a pleasant evening! An honourable mention was accorded to the Raminea sawmill tramway, Port Esperance and the firm of Chesterman and Co, as well as a present day member of that Chesterman family. The Raminea Mill’s Caterpillar D7 frame from LR 253  February 2017, was also briefly on screen. The “May Queen’ was the ketch that transported the sawmill product to Hobart and was the subject of this documentary. 


Maybe try iVIEW or similar.


Cheers

Peter Cokley



Re: Light Railways 259

John Dennis
 

My plans have been to try and get the PDF subscribers' emails sent so that they roughly coincide with delivery of the magazines. LR 259 went to the Post Office on Wednesday, very unlikely for any to be delivered on Thursday, and with Friday a public holiday I am not expecting any deliveries until Monday. However I can see that particularly overseas subscribers might get a bit concerned at not receiving the download invitation. I shall get that done within an hour.

The link I mentioned in my announcement was meant for non-members, to buy a copy from the online shop. Things have been a bit hectic in the Dennis household over the last week or two, and I rushed things a bit. 

Apologies for the confusion - I shall try and do better next time. PDF subscribers: stand by for your magazines...

John Dennis


On 28 January 2018 at 11:26, brucerankin@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Hi,

 

Can I ask when the PDF access link will be sent to subscribing members please?

 

Thanks,

Bruce

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@....au]
Sent: Wednesday, 24 January 2018 15:05
To: LRRSA Yahoogroup <LRRSA@...>
Subject: [LRRSA] Light Railways 259

 

 

We had nine willing volunteers last night, setting a new world record for the number of pullers, plonkers and stuffers available at an LRRSA mailout on a Tuesday night. With so many hands the job was done in double quick time, allowing said volunteers to enjoy a lively conversation over supper. The magazine was handed over to Australia Post today.

 

The magazine's contents are:

 

The Coffs Harbour Timber Company Limited, Part 2 (NSW)

Bongaree’s jetties – more from Bribie Island (QLD)

A Warburton timber man (Vic)

The Wombat Creek Tramway, North Warrandyte (Vic)

Industrial Railway News - 17 items from around Australia and Fiji

Letters - EM Baldwin tunnelling locomotives Job Number 5366; LR258 - An important milestone, and a correction; Plateways of Melbourne (LR 258)

Obituary - Michael Clifford Galway Schrader 30.9..1930 – 27.11.2017

Field Reports - Fermoy, Woods Point Central and Vulcan mines, Woods Point (Vic)

Heritage & Tourist News - 6 items from Australia

 

Society members should be receiving their copies over the next few days (allowing for a public holiday on Friday). I do not know when copies may appear in your local Newsagency, but they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa..org.au and follow the link. 

 

Note that the Adelaide meeting date shown in the magazine. The SA Group will be meeting on Thursday 1 February 2018 at 8:00 pm. Ignore the date in the magazine.

 

John Dennis

LRRSA Sales


Re: Light Railways 259

Kevin Sewell
 

Phew!!! - I looked and couldn't see a link. I assumed my browsing skills were at fault.

On Sun, Jan 28, 2018 at 11:36 AM, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 2)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Although John wrote:


 they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa..org.au and follow the link. 

. . . this time, like Bruce, I’ve not been able to find the link either.

David 


On 28 Jan 2018, at 00:26, brucerankin@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:



Hi,
 
Can I ask when the PDF access link will be sent to subscribing members please?
 
Thanks,
Bruce
 
From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] 
Sent: Wednesday, 24 January 2018 15:05
To: LRRSA Yahoogroup <LRRSA@...>
Subject: [LRRSA] Light Railways 259
 
  
We had nine willing volunteers last night, setting a new world record for the number of pullers, plonkers and stuffers available at an LRRSA mailout on a Tuesday night. With so many hands the job was done in double quick time, allowing said volunteers to enjoy a lively conversation over supper. The magazine was handed over to Australia Post today.
 
The magazine's contents are:
 
The Coffs Harbour Timber Company Limited, Part 2 (NSW)
Bongaree’s jetties – more from Bribie Island (QLD)
A Warburton timber man (Vic)
The Wombat Creek Tramway, North Warrandyte (Vic)
Industrial Railway News - 17 items from around Australia and Fiji
Letters - EM Baldwin tunnelling locomotives Job Number 5366; LR258 - An important milestone, and a correction; Plateways of Melbourne (LR 258)
Obituary - Michael Clifford Galway Schrader 30.9..1930 – 27.11.2017
Field Reports - Fermoy, Woods Point Central and Vulcan mines, Woods Point (Vic)
Heritage & Tourist News - 6 items from Australia
 
Society members should be receiving their copies over the next few days (allowing for a public holiday on Friday). I do not know when copies may appear in your local Newsagency, but they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa..org.au and follow the link. 
 
Note that the Adelaide meeting date shown in the magazine. The SA Group will be meeting on Thursday 1 February 2018 at 8:00 pm. Ignore the date in the magazine.
 
John Dennis
LRRSA Sales






--
Cheers,
Kevin

Blowing out someone else's candle does not make your's burn any brighter.

Re: Light Railways 259

David Halfpenny
 

Although John wrote:

 they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa..org.au and follow the link. 

. . . this time, like Bruce, I’ve not been able to find the link either.

David 


On 28 Jan 2018, at 00:26, brucerankin@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:



Hi,
 
Can I ask when the PDF access link will be sent to subscribing members please?
 
Thanks,
Bruce
 
From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, 24 January 2018 15:05
To: LRRSA Yahoogroup <LRRSA@...>
Subject: [LRRSA] Light Railways 259
 
  
We had nine willing volunteers last night, setting a new world record for the number of pullers, plonkers and stuffers available at an LRRSA mailout on a Tuesday night. With so many hands the job was done in double quick time, allowing said volunteers to enjoy a lively conversation over supper. The magazine was handed over to Australia Post today.
 
The magazine's contents are:
 
The Coffs Harbour Timber Company Limited, Part 2 (NSW)
Bongaree’s jetties – more from Bribie Island (QLD)
A Warburton timber man (Vic)
The Wombat Creek Tramway, North Warrandyte (Vic)
Industrial Railway News - 17 items from around Australia and Fiji
Letters - EM Baldwin tunnelling locomotives Job Number 5366; LR258 - An important milestone, and a correction; Plateways of Melbourne (LR 258)
Obituary - Michael Clifford Galway Schrader 30.9..1930 – 27.11.2017
Field Reports - Fermoy, Woods Point Central and Vulcan mines, Woods Point (Vic)
Heritage & Tourist News - 6 items from Australia
 
Society members should be receiving their copies over the next few days (allowing for a public holiday on Friday). I do not know when copies may appear in your local Newsagency, but they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa..org.au and follow the link. 
 
Note that the Adelaide meeting date shown in the magazine. The SA Group will be meeting on Thursday 1 February 2018 at 8:00 pm. Ignore the date in the magazine.
 
John Dennis
LRRSA Sales



Re: Light Railways 259

bjr2105
 

Hi,

 

Can I ask when the PDF access link will be sent to subscribing members please?

 

Thanks,

Bruce

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 24 January 2018 15:05
To: LRRSA Yahoogroup
Subject: [LRRSA] Light Railways 259

 

 

We had nine willing volunteers last night, setting a new world record for the number of pullers, plonkers and stuffers available at an LRRSA mailout on a Tuesday night. With so many hands the job was done in double quick time, allowing said volunteers to enjoy a lively conversation over supper. The magazine was handed over to Australia Post today.

 

The magazine's contents are:

 

The Coffs Harbour Timber Company Limited, Part 2 (NSW)

Bongaree’s jetties – more from Bribie Island (QLD)

A Warburton timber man (Vic)

The Wombat Creek Tramway, North Warrandyte (Vic)

Industrial Railway News - 17 items from around Australia and Fiji

Letters - EM Baldwin tunnelling locomotives Job Number 5366; LR258 - An important milestone, and a correction; Plateways of Melbourne (LR 258)

Obituary - Michael Clifford Galway Schrader 30.9..1930 – 27.11.2017

Field Reports - Fermoy, Woods Point Central and Vulcan mines, Woods Point (Vic)

Heritage & Tourist News - 6 items from Australia

 

Society members should be receiving their copies over the next few days (allowing for a public holiday on Friday). I do not know when copies may appear in your local Newsagency, but they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa..org.au and follow the link. 

 

Note that the Adelaide meeting date shown in the magazine. The SA Group will be meeting on Thursday 1 February 2018 at 8:00 pm. Ignore the date in the magazine.

 

John Dennis

LRRSA Sales

Re: Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

Tony Coen
 

That clears that up, Greg. Thanks for that.
 
    Tony.
 

Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 12:26 AM
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855
 
 

The photo in Branagan’s book is of the 3’ 6” gauge Grubb’s Silver Mining Co tramway at Zeehan.

Greg Johnston

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: mailto:LRRSA@...
Sent: Friday, 26 January 2018 11:19 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855




Greetings, chaps.

For a long time, I have possessed notes on Grubb and Tyson’s Tramway and they reflect that the tramway was in operation, possibly into the early 1880s. According to my notes, the mill at Underwood closed down in 1869 and the tramway continued on spasmodically as a means of moving people and goods in and out of the respective area. It claims that the Launceston terminus of the line was at the present day site of the Mowbray Hotel. I have been to the Hollybank forestry reserve on a few occasions and have walked along the formation where it runs through the park.

I know that J.G. Branagan’s book “Bush Tramways and Private Railways of Tasmania” is not the most fallible of tomes on railway history that any of us have read, but his description of the tramway’s story is similar to my notes. Furthermore, Branagan’s grandfather was one of the men who erected the Piper’s River Mill and built the tramway, so there may be some credibility in his description of the tramway.

Branagan also has a photo. in his book that purports to show a tram in a deep cutting on the line, with credits given to the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston. We all know that Museum people are subjective in their interpretations of such things, but I would suggest that the photo. is of some other well-built railway and not of the tramway in question. It would certainly have been built with the least amount of expense, and not have such a lavish cutting anywhere en route. The gauge does appear to be around 4’6”, though.

Since your discussions appeared in this medium, I searched around on Google and found information that might be clarification of the tramway’s operations, but such write-ups are often derived from hear-say. Have a look at http--www.forest-education.com-wp-content-uploads-2017-07-hollybank_a_brief_history_sml.pdf

Look forward to anything further on the existence or otherwise of this interesting tramway.

Cheers,

    Tony Coen.

Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:16 PM

To: LRRSA@...

Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

 

Hello David,

The reference to gauge has now been removed from the article - which I think is the right approach.

4 ft 6 in is more plausible than 3 ft 6 in,  but without documentary evidence it is just a guess.

Regards,
Frank



On 17/01/2018 8:54 PM, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 2)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] wrote:

 

On 17 Jan 2018, at 09:20, mailto:frank.stamford@bigpond..com [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

The link below is to a very interesting item about a timber tramway proposed in 1855 and partly built near Launceston, Tasmania. (Not to be confused with Grubb's Tramway near Zeehan, which operated about 40 years later). There is a very detailed map. I question the statement in the Wikipedia article that this tramway was 3 ft 6 in gauge, as that gauge was almost unknown in 1855. I would like to see some evidence from the period before accepting that!

It’s been corrected to 4’ 6” Frank, which is the old Scotch gauge and very plausible for the period.

David 1/2d




Re: Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

Greg Johnston
 

The photo in Branagan’s book is of the 3’ 6” gauge Grubb’s Silver Mining Co tramway at Zeehan.

 

Greg Johnston

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: ajcoen@... [LRRSA]
Sent: Friday, 26 January 2018 11:19 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

 




Greetings, chaps.

 

For a long time, I have possessed notes on Grubb and Tyson’s Tramway and they reflect that the tramway was in operation, possibly into the early 1880s. According to my notes, the mill at Underwood closed down in 1869 and the tramway continued on spasmodically as a means of moving people and goods in and out of the respective area. It claims that the Launceston terminus of the line was at the present day site of the Mowbray Hotel. I have been to the Hollybank forestry reserve on a few occasions and have walked along the formation where it runs through the park.

 

I know that J.G. Branagan’s book “Bush Tramways and Private Railways of Tasmania” is not the most fallible of tomes on railway history that any of us have read, but his description of the tramway’s story is similar to my notes. Furthermore, Branagan’s grandfather was one of the men who erected the Piper’s River Mill and built the tramway, so there may be some credibility in his description of the tramway.

 

Branagan also has a photo. in his book that purports to show a tram in a deep cutting on the line, with credits given to the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston. We all know that Museum people are subjective in their interpretations of such things, but I would suggest that the photo. is of some other well-built railway and not of the tramway in question. It would certainly have been built with the least amount of expense, and not have such a lavish cutting anywhere en route. The gauge does appear to be around 4’6”, though.

 

Since your discussions appeared in this medium, I searched around on Google and found information that might be clarification of the tramway’s operations, but such write-ups are often derived from hear-say. Have a look at http--www.forest-education.com-wp-content-uploads-2017-07-hollybank_a_brief_history_sml.pdf

 

Look forward to anything further on the existence or otherwise of this interesting tramway.

 

Cheers,

 

    Tony Coen.

 

Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:16 PM

Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

 

 

Hello David,

The reference to gauge has now been removed from the article - which I think is the right approach.

4 ft 6 in is more plausible than 3 ft 6 in,  but without documentary evidence it is just a guess.

Regards,
Frank



On 17/01/2018 8:54 PM, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 2)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] wrote:

 

 

On 17 Jan 2018, at 09:20, mailto:frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

The link below is to a very interesting item about a timber tramway proposed in 1855 and partly built near Launceston, Tasmania. (Not to be confused with Grubb's Tramway near Zeehan, which operated about 40 years later). There is a very detailed map. I question the statement in the Wikipedia article that this tramway was 3 ft 6 in gauge, as that gauge was almost unknown in 1855. I would like to see some evidence from the period before accepting that!

 

It’s been corrected to 4’ 6” Frank, which is the old Scotch gauge and very plausible for the period.

 

David 1/2d

 

 




Re: Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

Tony Coen
 

Greetings, chaps.
 
For a long time, I have possessed notes on Grubb and Tyson’s Tramway and they reflect that the tramway was in operation, possibly into the early 1880s. According to my notes, the mill at Underwood closed down in 1869 and the tramway continued on spasmodically as a means of moving people and goods in and out of the respective area. It claims that the Launceston terminus of the line was at the present day site of the Mowbray Hotel. I have been to the Hollybank forestry reserve on a few occasions and have walked along the formation where it runs through the park.
 
I know that J.G. Branagan’s book “Bush Tramways and Private Railways of Tasmania” is not the most fallible of tomes on railway history that any of us have read, but his description of the tramway’s story is similar to my notes. Furthermore, Branagan’s grandfather was one of the men who erected the Piper’s River Mill and built the tramway, so there may be some credibility in his description of the tramway.
 
Branagan also has a photo. in his book that purports to show a tram in a deep cutting on the line, with credits given to the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston. We all know that Museum people are subjective in their interpretations of such things, but I would suggest that the photo. is of some other well-built railway and not of the tramway in question. It would certainly have been built with the least amount of expense, and not have such a lavish cutting anywhere en route. The gauge does appear to be around 4’6”, though.
 
Since your discussions appeared in this medium, I searched around on Google and found information that might be clarification of the tramway’s operations, but such write-ups are often derived from hear-say. Have a look at http--www.forest-education.com-wp-content-uploads-2017-07-hollybank_a_brief_history_sml.pdf
 
Look forward to anything further on the existence or otherwise of this interesting tramway.
 
Cheers,
 
    Tony Coen.
 

Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:16 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855
 
 

Hello David,

The reference to gauge has now been removed from the article - which I think is the right approach.

4 ft 6 in is more plausible than 3 ft 6 in,  but without documentary evidence it is just a guess.

Regards,
Frank



On 17/01/2018 8:54 PM, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 2)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

 

On 17 Jan 2018, at 09:20, mailto:frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 
The link below is to a very interesting item about a timber tramway proposed in 1855 and partly built near Launceston, Tasmania. (Not to be confused with Grubb's Tramway near Zeehan, which operated about 40 years later). There is a very detailed map. I question the statement in the Wikipedia article that this tramway was 3 ft 6 in gauge, as that gauge was almost unknown in 1855. I would like to see some evidence from the period before accepting that!
 
It’s been corrected to 4’ 6” Frank, which is the old Scotch gauge and very plausible for the period.
 
David 1/2d
 

 

Light Railways 259

John Dennis
 

We had nine willing volunteers last night, setting a new world record for the number of pullers, plonkers and stuffers available at an LRRSA mailout on a Tuesday night. With so many hands the job was done in double quick time, allowing said volunteers to enjoy a lively conversation over supper. The magazine was handed over to Australia Post today.

The magazine's contents are:

The Coffs Harbour Timber Company Limited, Part 2 (NSW)
Bongaree’s jetties – more from Bribie Island (QLD)
A Warburton timber man (Vic)
The Wombat Creek Tramway, North Warrandyte (Vic)
Industrial Railway News - 17 items from around Australia and Fiji
Letters - EM Baldwin tunnelling locomotives Job Number 5366; LR258 - An important milestone, and a correction; Plateways of Melbourne (LR 258)
Obituary - Michael Clifford Galway Schrader 30.9.1930 – 27.11.2017
Field Reports - Fermoy, Woods Point Central and Vulcan mines, Woods Point (Vic)
Heritage & Tourist News - 6 items from Australia

Society members should be receiving their copies over the next few days (allowing for a public holiday on Friday). I do not know when copies may appear in your local Newsagency, but they are available today in both printed and PDF from from the LRRSA online shop: go to http://lrrsa.org.au and follow the link. 

Note that the Adelaide meeting date shown in the magazine. The SA Group will be meeting on Thursday 1 February 2018 at 8:00 pm. Ignore the date in the magazine.

John Dennis
LRRSA Sales

Re: Timber tramway proposed near Launceston, 1855

Frank Stamford
 

Hello David,

The reference to gauge has now been removed from the article - which I think is the right approach.

4 ft 6 in is more plausible than 3 ft 6 in,  but without documentary evidence it is just a guess.

Regards,
Frank



On 17/01/2018 8:54 PM, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 2)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 


On 17 Jan 2018, at 09:20, frank..stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

The link below is to a very interesting item about a timber tramway proposed in 1855 and partly built near Launceston, Tasmania. (Not to be confused with Grubb's Tramway near Zeehan, which operated about 40 years later). There is a very detailed map. I question the statement in the Wikipedia article that this tramway was 3 ft 6 in gauge, as that gauge was almost unknown in 1855. I would like to see some evidence from the period before accepting that!

It’s been corrected to 4’ 6” Frank, which is the old Scotch gauge and very plausible for the period.

David 1/2d