Date   
TOTALLY OFF TOPIC - photos from Europe

Michael C.
 

Dear all,
 
A belated Happy New Year!
 
Apologies for filing your inbox with another off-topic email, but I've been uploading photographs to Flickr again.
 
Just before Christmas I went to Brussels in Belgium to visit the new Train World museum. Visit: http://www.trainworld.be/en
 
As a collection it's very good, as a museum site it's very good, as a display it's awful! Why - because it's far too dark.
 
It appears they have had consultants in telling them how to do it; the result is a collection of locomotives that are displayed with music in the dark. Spot-lights come on and go off so if you're trying to get a photograph you have to wait for the right moment.
 
 
Take a look if you're interested.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly

Re: Tintenbar NSW

Petan
 

Bit more on the early mills and not known if these early ones had tramways apart from the Rous /  Alstonville operation. Again, this might help someone doing that region.

One of the many (1) early pre NSWGR railway era sugar mills near the future Tweed government railway line, was located at Nashua, between Booyong and Bangalow, and had a staff of 50. (2) ‘Byways of Steam 18’ relates that Tooheys, who owned the Nashua mill, supplied the hogsheads of beer free for the railway’s ‘Turning of the First Sod’. By 1894 the Nashua sugar mill was closed, and its equipment shipped by the vessel Wyoming from Tintenbar in the Ballina district to what the newspaper called the Kolan sugar mill in the Burnett River, QLD, district. (3) The newspaper account did not indicate if the Wyoming reached Tintenbar or if a barge did the local section and transferred the cargo to the Wyoming at the Port of Ballina.  Tintenbar’s wharf reserve was listed in the Government Gazette of 8 January 1887 (4).  

 

[1] One suggested list of Richmond sugar mills of the 1880s. Northern Star (Lismore) 3 May 1946 P.6 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99114328

2 Northern Star (Lismore) 16 November 1889 P.4 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71714104

3 The Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser 5 November 1894 P.3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216439388  

4 Reserve from Sale For Wharf (Tintenbar) Government Gazette 8 January 1887 P.187  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219932611 and the 1904 version http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226489159

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley  

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Saturday, 6 January 2018 9:11 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Tintenbar NSW

 

Tintenbar is the head of navigation up Emigrant Creek from the Richmond River near Ballina. One of my Tweed Tramway articles discusses the sugar cane transported on the Tweed railway from beyond Bangalow in the 1890s and I came across this Trove; The Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser 5 November 1894 P.3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216439388    

 

The Tintenbar town plan of 1888 (southern not northern section) from NSW SIX http://www.nswlrs.com.au/land_titles/historical_research/parish_maps reveals two CSR wharves plus two other wharves within the Tintenbar town area. Best to download that town plan if interested as the relevant streets no longer exist although they show on the cadastral on NSW Globe. Two CSR wharves, maybe an old or newer, suggest CSR interest and maybe a tramway?

 

Tintenbar is not a main part of my Tweed project so I had better finish and submit all my Tweed articles to LR before I get side tracked on the Ballina region, so maybe this may help some else’s project.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley



Tintenbar NSW

Petan
 

Tintenbar is the head of navigation up Emigrant Creek from the Richmond River near Ballina. One of my Tweed Tramway articles discusses the sugar cane transported on the Tweed railway from beyond Bangalow in the 1890s and I came across this Trove; The Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser 5 November 1894 P.3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216439388    

 

The Tintenbar town plan of 1888 (southern not northern section) from NSW SIX http://www.nswlrs.com.au/land_titles/historical_research/parish_maps reveals two CSR wharves plus two other wharves within the Tintenbar town area. Best to download that town plan if interested as the relevant streets no longer exist although they show on the cadastral on NSW Globe. Two CSR wharves, maybe an old or newer, suggest CSR interest and maybe a tramway?

 

Tintenbar is not a main part of my Tweed project so I had better finish and submit all my Tweed articles to LR before I get side tracked on the Ballina region, so maybe this may help some else’s project.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

 

Re: : Wandong

David in Avenel
 

Thanks for the info Colin, that Unit 463 is the very box I was going through.

--
best wishes and a Merry Christmas to you all,  
David in Avenel.au
{Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.)

Re: : Wandong

Colin Harvey
 

Hi David

This siding was costed in 1892 at the same time as a proposal to replace the level crossing with an overbridge. Details are on file 92/14771 in VPRS 421/P0, Unit 463. This file has a plan of the proposal, but is it the same plan you saw?

I’m sure that the siding was not constructed into the works as proposed as it doesn’t appear in later photographs of the seasoning works, despite a reference in 1894 by the Engineer for Existing Lines recommending that rails and fastenings supplied for connection between Coy’s siding and railway siding at Wandong & value about £30 added to interest charges for other material &c (VPRS 12623/P1, Unit 1, Corres. No. 7235). Also no one I have spoken with at Wandong has any knowledge of a broad-gauge siding in the works.

There seems to be some confusion about how material supplied by the VR for use in the Company’s narrow-gauge tramway was used. In 1899 the Crown Solicitor stated that transfer of Co.’s siding to VR had been  completed (VPRS 12623/P1, Unit 16, Corres. No. 6489) but this may mean the transfer of the licence issued by the Lands Dept for the tramway from the mill to Wandong.

Regards

Colin

Wandong

David in Avenel
 

Hi all,

Just seen an 1892 plan for Wandong and it shows a proposed siding into a timber seasoning works which would have been located on the east side of the railway line.  Did this ever get built does anyone know?

A later tracing dated 1989 makes no mention of this but that doesn't prove anything as the proposal was pencilled on not inked.

--
best wishes and a Merry Christmas to you all,  
David in Avenel.au
{Before you change anything, learn why it is the way it is.)

Brisbane Grafton data

Petan
 

Some track plans as well as maps and line histories for Brisbane to Grafton and Casino to Murwillumbah lines, are now available thanks to the generosity of various people who sent these via email. The working plans and sections for the Grafton Casino Murwillumbah Condong lines are included.

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1KCnx3cACRdCeM2yc9UbIcCK7i4UHh6Io

Those who read Ian Dunn’s Byways of Steam 18: 'the railway from nowhere to nowhere': the Grafton to the Tweed Railway 1894-1932, published by Eveleigh Press NSW  in 2002, would know about the proposed line from Killarney in Queensland to Legume just over the border in NSW and onwards to Grafton via Bonalbo. While I don’t have plans for that, this download does have plans for parts of the Casino Bonalbo Tenterfield line of which parts of the Casino section were built. Not all proposals went through Bonalbo.

Some other proposed lines in the Tenterfield Casino area are marked on the historical parish cadastrals obtainable from NSW Historical Land Records Viewer. Perhaps start at either Tenterfield Parish or Tabulam parish around a probably era and follow the marked surveys through the adjoining parish maps http://www.nswlrs.com.au/land_titles/historical_research/parish_maps

Thanks to those who forwarded material including Kevin Spicer and Monty Cello (Niagarapark on QRIG yahoogroup). Others wish to remain anonymous or I have not recorded their names and sorry about that if that is you and send me a private email as I have tried to be careful and respectful with names.

Section 30 of the Grafton Casino working plans and section was unavailable and so I did a substitute page with the history and track plans for Mount Neville at 477 miles 41 chains (768.481km), which was a station on sheet 30.

Also note one of the plans correctly shows what was usually known as South Brisbane Interstate Station as using it correct name of Brisbane as it was known and marked on NSWGR sourced plans in 1930 at the lines opening. The image resolution is the best I have.

Cheers

Peter Cokley

Re: Federal mill

silvansau
 

Hi again Frank,
                        Thank you for your reply and I thought the barrel staves barrel saw was an easy one for you.
                         Have a Happy Xmas and I am looking forward to the next “Light Railways” issue.
                                                               Yours,
                                                                          Keith Holmes
 

Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 8:59 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Federal mill
 


Hello Keith,

Thank you for your reminiscences of the New Federal and Ada River areas.

Unfortunately I also cannot understand how the saws for barrel staves work, hopefully someone else on this list may be able to explain that.

When you say "the latest Light Railway discussion group, i presume you are referring to the Light Railways of Australia Facebook Group which was mentioned in the latest Light Railways.

There is no email address for it, but there is a website address:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/LightRailwaysAustralia/

If you are not already a Facebook user you will be asked to join Facebook.

We currently have 281 members on the Light Railways of Australia Facebook page, but that umber is constantly growing.

Regards,
Frank


On 18/12/2017 4:51 PM, 'Keith Holmes' sherlock@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 
Hi Frank.
               I have realized that I have a household of books now and hardly ever read any so I pulled out “Mountains of Ash” and devoured it again and also your co authored “Powelltown”. Having walked a lot of this area I am reasonably familiar with that area.
               The last time to the New Federal I had a friend with me who as a young boy was at the Ada No2 in 39 and his uncle dragged him into the dugout and they survived. The leaches are still there and he copped one in the eye that morning. Lunch at the New Federal we stood up as we could hear their teeth gnashing. I drove the wife up to the Ada Tree another day  and that day there were two car loads and I mentioned the man who brought the art of the high leads to the country and one of of the older ladies said “His name was Jack Corbet and he boarded at our place in Warburton.
               The main reason that I have contacted you is that the Federal used barrel saws and even with a couple of photos I still can`t understand how they work. So Frank can describe how they work for me and it will be in my head for future knowledge.
                Now to my last request and could you please give me the the email address of the latest Light Railway discussion group.
                I have been a member since around 1962 and I still devour all news.
                                                                     Kind regards.
                                                                                          Keith Holmes. 
 
.

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Re: Federal mill

Frank Stamford
 

Hello Keith,

Thank you for your reminiscences of the New Federal and Ada River areas.

Unfortunately I also cannot understand how the saws for barrel staves work, hopefully someone else on this list may be able to explain that.

When you say "the latest Light Railway discussion group, i presume you are referring to the Light Railways of Australia Facebook Group which was mentioned in the latest Light Railways.

There is no email address for it, but there is a website address:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/LightRailwaysAustralia/

If you are not already a Facebook user you will be asked to join Facebook.

We currently have 281 members on the Light Railways of Australia Facebook page, but that umber is constantly growing.

Regards,
Frank


On 18/12/2017 4:51 PM, 'Keith Holmes' sherlock@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

Hi Frank.
               I have realized that I have a household of books now and hardly ever read any so I pulled out “Mountains of Ash” and devoured it again and also your co authored “Powelltown”. Having walked a lot of this area I am reasonably familiar with that area.
               The last time to the New Federal I had a friend with me who as a young boy was at the Ada No2 in 39 and his uncle dragged him into the dugout and they survived. The leaches are still there and he copped one in the eye that morning. Lunch at the New Federal we stood up as we could hear their teeth gnashing. I drove the wife up to the Ada Tree another day  and that day there were two car loads and I mentioned the man who brought the art of the high leads to the country and one of of the older ladies said “His name was Jack Corbet and he boarded at our place in Warburton.
               The main reason that I have contacted you is that the Federal used barrel saws and even with a couple of photos I still can`t understand how they work. So Frank can describe how they work for me and it will be in my head for future knowledge.
                Now to my last request and could you please give me the the email address of the latest Light Railway discussion group.
                I have been a member since around 1962 and I still devour all news.
                                                                     Kind regards.
                                                                                          Keith Holmes. 

.


Federal mill

silvansau
 

Hi Frank.
               I have realized that I have a household of books now and hardly ever read any so I pulled out “Mountains of Ash” and devoured it again and also your co authored “Powelltown”. Having walked a lot of this area I am reasonably familiar with that area.
               The last time to the New Federal I had a friend with me who as a young boy was at the Ada No2 in 39 and his uncle dragged him into the dugout and they survived. The leaches are still there and he copped one in the eye that morning. Lunch at the New Federal we stood up as we could hear their teeth gnashing. I drove the wife up to the Ada Tree another day  and that day there were two car loads and I mentioned the man who brought the art of the high leads to the country and one of of the older ladies said “His name was Jack Corbet and he boarded at our place in Warburton.
               The main reason that I have contacted you is that the Federal used barrel saws and even with a couple of photos I still can`t understand how they work. So Frank can describe how they work for me and it will be in my head for future knowledge.
                Now to my last request and could you please give me the the email address of the latest Light Railway discussion group.
                I have been a member since around 1962 and I still devour all news.
                                                                     Kind regards.
                                                                                          Keith Holmes. 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

Gleniffer Incline NSW

Sam Laybutt
 

Has anyone visited to the Gleniffer Incline near Bellingen NSW?


There is a great write-up on it in LR100 which includes mention of a tunnel located approximately here:

https://www.google.com.au/maps/place/30%C2%B022'44.8%22S+152%C2%B051'06.2%22E/@-30.379123,152.8508997,351m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d-30.3791227!4d152.851732

Re: : Speed Limit 20 Plus

dickwho1
 

I still have my original.

 

On 8 Dec 2017, at 10:38, Rod Hutchinson rodhutchy@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

There is a few in Branchline, Victoria, Australia.


Rod Hutchinson
Mooroolbark
Australia

On 8 Dec. 2017 09:24, "frank.stamford@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Anyone intending to buy a copy of Speed Limit 20 Plus should not delay. We ordered 64 copies and have already sold more than half, and I think sales will be going equally quickly through other outlets. The publishers also have sold most of the print run.

Frank

Re: : Speed Limit 20 Plus

Rod Hutchinson
 

There is a few in Branchline, Victoria, Australia.


Rod Hutchinson
Mooroolbark
Australia

On 8 Dec. 2017 09:24, "frank.stamford@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Anyone intending to buy a copy of Speed Limit 20 Plus should not delay. We ordered 64 copies and have already sold more than half, and I think sales will be going equally quickly through other outlets. The publishers also have sold most of the print run.

Frank

Re: : Speed Limit 20 Plus

Michael C.
 

We have 20, sorry 19 at the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway in Porthmadog.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1792451634130674&id=362079400501245

Michael Chapman

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

"frank.stamford@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

Anyone intending to buy a copy of Speed Limit 20 Plus should not delay. We ordered 64 copies and have already sold more than half, and I think sales will be going equally quickly through other outlets. The publishers also have sold most of the print run.

Frank

Re: : Speed Limit 20 Plus

Frank Stamford
 

Anyone intending to buy a copy of Speed Limit 20 Plus should not delay. We ordered 64 copies and have already sold more than half, and I think sales will be going equally quickly through other outlets. The publishers also have sold most of the print run.
Frank

Re: [TramsDownUnder] rE: re: RE: Re Rare pictures - the VR St Kilda tramway / railway connection

Noel Reed
 

On  Wednesday, 29 November 2017 2:22 PM      Matthew Geier <matthew@...  wrote---

In recent times in Sydney, the AK inspection train has been hauled by a
pair of S set motors on each end. They fitted MU cables though the AK set so the front 'C' car could control the rear two, not just the one coupled 'elephant style' behind it. ...............................................

A separate temporary MU cable was used back in the fifties when a new VR ‘flat-top’ T class loco built by the Clyde Engineering Co was trialled on standard gauge in Sydney coupled with Clyde loco ‘D1’ which was purchased by the Fyansford Cement Co near Geelong, Victoria. These two locos ran in MU to Victoria, were changed to 5’3” gauge at Bandiana and operated to Melbourne.                                    Loco D1 was changed again to 3’6” gauge  to replace an Australian Standard Garratt  [ASG] loco for use on the Fyansford quarry line. The quarry line had Westinghouse single line automatic signalling with track circuits, supplied by McKenzie & Holland Aust.

After the quarry railway closed, the 3’6” gauge loco D1 was purchased by the VR, changed again to 5’3” gauge, re-numbered to  T413 and used on the Wodonga – Cudgewa line because it had been originally equipped for its use at Fyansford with dynamic braking because of the steep grades.

Noel Reed

From: TramsDownUnder@... [mailto:TramsDownUnder@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 29 November 2017 2:22 PM
To: TramsDownUnder@...
Subject: Re: [TramsDownUnder] rE: re: RE: Re Rare pictures - the VR St Kilda tramway / railway connection

So the old motors could be coupled back to back ?

I'm not so familiar with the old single deck (32v control) Sydney stock,
but the DD motors were specifically wired so that it was impossible to
couple two motors back to back and have a viable combination. There were
no MU sockets at the other end, only jumper cables. Couple two back to
back and there was no way to MU them together.

They could be coupled nose-to-tail and did run in MMTM combinations. The
heritage F1 set is in a MMTM combination. (Or CCTC in Sydney notation)

In recent times in Sydney, the AK inspection train has been hauled by a
pair of S set motors on each end. They fitted MU cables though the AK set so the front 'C' car could control the rear two, not just the one coupled 'elephant style' behind it. __._,_._

Posted by: Matthew Geier <matthew@...>


Re: Speed Limit 20 Plus

Frank Stamford
 


That is  very good change to the Shop, I think.

The first page looks much less cluttered, and the link to the sign on screen is almost the first thing you see.

Regards,
Frank
 

On 30/11/2017 6:02 PM, John Dennis jdennis412@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 
Back again,

The online shop has been modified. The sign in and password boxes have been removed, and there is now a "Sign In" link on the top menu line. Clicking on this link will open a new page allowing sign in details. 

In addition, the shopping cart has been removed from the right hand side of the screen, and a link also appears on the top line. The result of this is that the right hand section of the shop has been deleted. 

I am investigating adding the "Featured Products" across the bottom of the page, but that change has not been made. 

The result of this is that logging in to the shop will be across a secure connection.

John

On 30 November 2017 at 15:03, John Dennis <jdennis412@...> wrote:
All,

I have done some research and asked a couple of knowledgeable friends. Chrome and Firefox (and possibly others) automatically display "Insecure Connection" if a web page includes the word "password" (or something like "enter your credit card details") and the connection is not secured - which means no encrypted. 

That means the mythical "man in the middle" could indeed collect your email and password, but what could he do with that? Buy books on your account, but how can he pay for them? You still need to enter credentials when paying. Every other page, after logging in, are indeed properly secured. 

I'm not certain whether the host of the online shop is able to install a security certificate from the society, which would, in any case, be just for this first page.

John Dennis
LRRSA Sales Officer


On 30 November 2017 at 09:48, 'Iain Stuart' iain_stuart@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Its common on everything though and doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem. I recall it was a Firefox browser problem which typically their support blamed on everyone’s anti-virus. Whether it is a real world problem is another question. My view is that it isn’t.

 

Cheers

 

Dr Iain Stuart

 

JCIS Consultants

P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North

NSW 2134

Australia

 

(02) 97010191

Iain_Stuart@...




Re: Speed Limit 20 Plus

John Dennis
 

Back again,

The online shop has been modified. The sign in and password boxes have been removed, and there is now a "Sign In" link on the top menu line. Clicking on this link will open a new page allowing sign in details. 

In addition, the shopping cart has been removed from the right hand side of the screen, and a link also appears on the top line. The result of this is that the right hand section of the shop has been deleted. 

I am investigating adding the "Featured Products" across the bottom of the page, but that change has not been made. 

The result of this is that logging in to the shop will be across a secure connection.

John

On 30 November 2017 at 15:03, John Dennis <jdennis412@...> wrote:
All,

I have done some research and asked a couple of knowledgeable friends. Chrome and Firefox (and possibly others) automatically display "Insecure Connection" if a web page includes the word "password" (or something like "enter your credit card details") and the connection is not secured - which means no encrypted. 

That means the mythical "man in the middle" could indeed collect your email and password, but what could he do with that? Buy books on your account, but how can he pay for them? You still need to enter credentials when paying. Every other page, after logging in, are indeed properly secured. 

I'm not certain whether the host of the online shop is able to install a security certificate from the society, which would, in any case, be just for this first page.

John Dennis
LRRSA Sales Officer


On 30 November 2017 at 09:48, 'Iain Stuart' iain_stuart@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Its common on everything though and doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem. I recall it was a Firefox browser problem which typically their support blamed on everyone’s anti-virus. Whether it is a real world problem is another question. My view is that it isn’t.

 

Cheers

 

Dr Iain Stuart

 

JCIS Consultants

P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North

NSW 2134

Australia

 

(02) 97010191

Iain_Stuart@...



Re: Speed Limit 20 Plus

John Dennis
 

All,

I have done some research and asked a couple of knowledgeable friends. Chrome and Firefox (and possibly others) automatically display "Insecure Connection" if a web page includes the word "password" (or something like "enter your credit card details") and the connection is not secured - which means no encrypted. 

That means the mythical "man in the middle" could indeed collect your email and password, but what could he do with that? Buy books on your account, but how can he pay for them? You still need to enter credentials when paying. Every other page, after logging in, are indeed properly secured. 

I'm not certain whether the host of the online shop is able to install a security certificate from the society, which would, in any case, be just for this first page.

John Dennis
LRRSA Sales Officer


On 30 November 2017 at 09:48, 'Iain Stuart' iain_stuart@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Its common on everything though and doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem. I recall it was a Firefox browser problem which typically their support blamed on everyone’s anti-virus. Whether it is a real world problem is another question. My view is that it isn’t.

 

Cheers

 

Dr Iain Stuart

 

JCIS Consultants

P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North

NSW 2134

Australia

 

(02) 97010191

Iain_Stuart@...


Re: Speed Limit 20 Plus

Iain
 

Its common on everything though and doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem. I recall it was a Firefox browser problem which typically their support blamed on everyone’s anti-virus. Whether it is a real world problem is another question. My view is that it isn’t.

 

Cheers

 

Dr Iain Stuart

 

JCIS Consultants

P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North

NSW 2134

Australia

 

(02) 97010191

Iain_Stuart@...