Date   

Re: Christmas Island 79

Brad P
 

Hi Noel,
             Are you saying the one in the shot above is not one of the 79 class?
  I saw a shot of the other type that were delivered and while the lowering of the nose on the 79 class made them look similar, I thought it was to far removed in cab look to be one of the 79 class.
 The loco in this shot does appear to have had its cab corners cut back as per the modification made to the 79s by NSWGR.

  About to finish work for the day. Will try to locate the shot of the other loco heavily buried in bush.

Brad


On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 6:33 PM, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.





Re: Christmas Island 79

Noel Reed
 

The loco pictured was one of those which went to the phosphate railway at Christmas Island..

 

The head light and marker lights are different to be those used on the 79’s on the  NSWGR. Knuckle couplers were not used on those in Sydney as most carriages shunted in Sydney Yard were screw coupled.

 

The 79s used in Sydney also had the sides of the cab roof mitred to conform with the loading gauge.  This would have been a modification after importation from the USA.  Do ARHS archives give any indication of its origin?

 

Noel Reed.

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 23 June 2015 12:13 PM
To: [LRRSA]; locoshed@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Christmas Island 79

 

 

Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

 

--

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Re: Christmas Island 79

Stefan
 

Hello,

you will show photos of the railway on Christmas Island (between Indonesia and Australia)? That's interesting. Do you also have photos of the german V36 (buolt in the late 1930's which has been used there?

Stefan

Am 23.06.2015 um 04:13 schrieb Brad Peadon alcogoodwin@... [LRRSA]:

 
Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

--


Christmas Island 79

Brad P
 

Chaps,
           Here is a photo being used in the next online project.

https://flic.kr/p/awfj4G

  A mental blank has me trying to work out which of the 79 class it would be.

  Can you help?

Brad

--


Date help please

Roderick Smith
 

I am scouring my collection for photos requested by Jim for his forthcoming book.  On what date was there an LRRSA tour to Belgrave South to inspect the gasworks loco there (before they were placed to work on PBR)?

TIA

Roderick B Smith

Transport analyst


Sandstone Estate, South Africa

Phil Rickard
 

from Railways Africa weekly newsletter:

"STARS OF SANDSTONE 2015

Condensed from RSSA report by Jean Dulez -

The third "Stars of Sandstone" event, 2-12 April 2015, featured special sunrise demonstration trains every second morning, using the larger locomotives with especially configured freight consists. Wednesday 8 April was set aside for a visit to Lukas Nel's workshop facility at the Transnet diesel depot in Bloemfontein. Saturday 11 April was a public open day, intended mainly for casual visitors (approximately 3,000) to ride the trains and see the other displays. At Sandstone's Hoekfontein farm, trains were operated throughout the mornings from around 09:00. Mid-mornings saw daily convoys organised by the Bloemfontein-based Armour Museum - along the various farm tracks - of military transport vehicles which visitors could ride. The early afternoon, after lunch, usually saw a military display, again by the Armour Museum, of various tanks and armoured cars, some of Russian design. The late afternoon, between 15:30 and 17:30, featured a full-length, double NGG16 Garratt-hauled passenger trip around the entire 25km, 610mm gauge railway. During each day there was a regular procession of vintage diesel tractors, steam traction engines, vintage motor cars and trucks providing regular sideshows in the vicinity of Hoekfontein station. Following this year's highly successful festival, it is planned now to hold Stars of Sandstone every two years - the next from 30 March  to  8 April 2017."




Climax Locomotive Twylight Outing 10 October 2015

Frank Stamford
 

Following the success of last year's event the Climax Locomotive Operating Committee of the Puffing Billy Preservation Society is running a "Climax Locomotive Twylight Outing" on Saturday 10 October 2015.

The train will depart Menzies Creek at 5.30pm and arrive at Lakeside at 7.15pm where a spit-roast dinner will be provided (vegetarians can be catered for). The train will then return to Menzies Creek where arrival is scheduled for 9.40pm.

The train will stop at a number of locations for listening and photographic opportunities.

The consist of the train will be canopied NQR passenger trucks, and open-top NQR passenger trucks.

The fare including the spit roast dinner and soft drinks is $70.00.

Bookings can be made at http://www.puffingbilly.com.au

 

and selecting Events & Dining

Regards,

Frank



Re: : Re: Re:: OFF TOPIC: More photographs from the UK

halfpilotstaff
 

Thanks kindly for taking the time and trouble with that information, Michael (and thus my turntable fantasies are dashed ).

Seriously, the bridge sounds to be very historically precious, almost as much as the Coalbrookdale footbridge.

halfpilotstaff


OFF TOPIC - even more photos from the UK

Michael C.
 

Hi all,
 
Here is my latest album of photos on Flickr.
 
This time they are from the 15" gauge Romney Hythe & Dymchurch Railway.
 
Take a look if you're interested:
 
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


Re: : OFF TOPIC: More photographs from the UK

Michael C.
 

Hi all,
 
On the 26th May a question was asked about some of the background details in some of my images on Flickr. These are the images:
 
 
 
I've now received an answer from the Armley Mills Industrial Museum:
 
Snip>>>>>
 
Dear Michael,

My colleague Lucy said that you wished to know more about an object that you saw during the Sierra Leone weekend.

The mystery object is actually a foot bridge that was made in Leeds and may in fact be one of the oldest footbridges in the world.

The bridge was constructed of cast iron in six sections and built by the Kirkstall Forge Company for the Great Northern Railway at Retford and later transferred to Todds Green between Stevenage and Hitchin.

The footbridge has a fish-bellied main frame with vertical members extending to hold horizontal wrought iron tension bars. Wrought iron parapet base also attached, with box frame and cross members to support a timber deck. The total span of the bridge is 52ft with a 5ft rise. The shallow cast iron arch was originally supported on brick abutments incorporating arched brick piers and staircases.

The footbridge is No. 93.a and was known as 'Halfpenny Bridge' where it stood at Toods Green. This name may relate to its former use as a toll bridge.

It is hoped that we will be able to restore the bridge in the near future now that we know more of its significance to our railway history.

Thanks for your enquiry,

Regards,

Amy

Amy Jenkinson

Assistant Curator of Industrial History

Leeds Industrial Museum Armley Mills

End snip<<<<<
 
I hope this helps?
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


 
 

In a message dated 29/05/2015 21:42:34 GMT Daylight Time, Chapmanmchapman@... writes:
Hello again,
 
I have made some enquiries with the people at Armley Mills and unfortunately the person who will know is on leave until the 16th June.
 
If and when I receive any more information I'll come back to you.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


 
 
In a message dated 29/05/2015 02:03:57 GMT Daylight Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

I'm not sure what's in the background of that image - I will investigate and come back to you.
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly

 
 
In a message dated 26/05/2015 09:06:51 GMT Daylight Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

Michael, in this photo, is that turntable remnants adjacent to where the track curves off into the grass?

https://flic.kr/p/tyMMQV

Cheerz

halfpilotsfaff


Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT [2 Attachments]

Frank Stamford
 

Hello David,

Thanks for those illustrations, which are very interesting.

Perhaps I should explain the reason I am looking for an illustration of an earlier Forney 0-4-4T locomotive.

I am collecting information which may lead to a small article on the genesis of the SAR V class and the horse operations on the Kingston - Naracoorte line. Ideally I would like to have an illustration of a Forney as running in New York in 1871, which is apparently what inspired Carl Pihl to suggest the Forney concept to Charles Beyer (of Beyer Peacock).

(From what I have read the horses were about 30 times more efficient when hauling on the railway compared to the road - but the road was absolutely terrible!)

Regards,

Frank


On 13 Jun 2015, at 10:53 pm, "'David Halfpenny (gmail)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 


On 13 Jun 2015, at 03:51, Frank Stamford frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:


I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.


Frank,

Ariel and Puck of the Billerica and Bedford RR went into service in 1877, so they aren’t exactly earlier, but they were definitely flangeless on the driving axle (the one next to the cab), and emphatically designed to run cab-forward (see ‘cow-catcher’ and main headlamp - and on the two foot way as well. 

Note from the Scale of feet on the drawing that the effective wheelbase (centre of Bissell truck to the coupled axle) is only 12 feet.

David



Warrnambool circuit

Roderick Smith
 

I am trying to caption a Jan.64 photo for a member completing a book.  Has anything been published on the kiddie circuit there?  It was electric, controlled from the ticket booth, and not from onboard.

Roderick B Smith

former RNV editor



Victorian History Awards

Stuart Thyer
 

With many of our Victorian authors producing excellent work, both in book and article form, please consider taking the time to enter in the relevant section. Entry is free. If anyone is aware of similar awards in other states, please let all know. It's great recognition for your hard work and the work of the society.


10) Victorian Community History Awards 2015

The Victorian Community History Awards for 2015 are now open. They are presented by the Royal Historical Society of Victoria and the Public Record Office of Victoria.

The Awards recognise excellence in historical storytelling. The range of award categories reflects the variety of formats that can be used to reach and enrich the lives of Victorians through history.

For details and the entry form go to www.historyvictoria.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/VHCA-2015-Entry-Form.pdf 

(Source: Don Garden, RHSV - email 14 June 2015)





Port Kembla No.2 mine

Chris Stratton
 

I went for a walk up from Farmborough Heights this afternoon to the old mine site which I think was Port Kembla No.2 mine. Embedded in the roadway between the buildings were three parallel rails. Doing rough measurements with shoes and a stick (I’ll take a tape measure next time) the gauge of the closer rails was around 1 foot 4 inches and the wider ones 3 foot 9 inches. So possibly they were 15 inch and 3 foot 6 inch tracks, allowing for some error with my rough measurements. I don’t have much info for this mine but I know the coal was taken out via a siding off the Unanderra-Moss Vale line known as Unanderra West  at 58 miles 32 chains from Sydney. The loading bins at this siding were a fair distance below the mine so the skips from the mine most likely were emptied where I found the rails and the coal conveyed down the hill to the loading bins. There were five brightly painted wheelsets lying around, they may have been brought there later and had nothing to do with the mine.

 

Regards,

Chris


Re: OFF-TOPIC; more photos from the UK

Michael C.
 

Thank you.

Glad to hear the photos are appreciated.

I've some shots from the 15" gauge Romney Hythe and Dymchurch Railway too if people are interested?

Cheers,

Michael Chapman

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

"Geoff Potter potgeoff@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

Michael,
fantastic, thanks again for sharing
Geoff Potter



On Friday, 12 June 2015, 9:36, "chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:


 
Hi all,
 
Over the past few days I've been in the garden of England - Kent.
 
Whilst there I went to see the 2'6" gauge Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway (S&KLR).
 
I spend a lot of time in Wales with The Great Little Trains of Wales - what makes the S&KLR so different is it is undeniably industrial. The line was built in 1905 to transport the raw materials needed to manufacture paper.
 
More more information please visit: http://www.sklr.net/
 
I visited the railway on Sunday the 7th June and the weather was perfect for photography.
 
Just in time for the last train of the day a coach carrying a group of German railway enthusiasts arrived and several photo run-pasts were organised.
 
By this time I'd exhausted both my sets of rechargeable batteries so had to sprint to the local Morrison's supermarket, buy a set of Duracell batteries, then run back to the station just in time to catch the train. Phew!
 
The results can be seen of Flickr at:
 
 
If you are ever in the UK a visit to the S&KLR is highly recommended - the stock is interesting, the scenery varied and different to every other preserved railway I've been to. The volunteers bent over backwards to show me round, explain everything and were friendly and chatty.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly




Re: OFF-TOPIC; more photos from the UK

Geoff Potter <potgeoff@...>
 

Michael,
fantastic, thanks again for sharing
Geoff Potter



On Friday, 12 June 2015, 9:36, "chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA]" wrote:


 
Hi all,
 
Over the past few days I've been in the garden of England - Kent.
 
Whilst there I went to see the 2'6" gauge Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway (S&KLR).
 
I spend a lot of time in Wales with The Great Little Trains of Wales - what makes the S&KLR so different is it is undeniably industrial. The line was built in 1905 to transport the raw materials needed to manufacture paper.
 
More more information please visit: http://www.sklr.net/
 
I visited the railway on Sunday the 7th June and the weather was perfect for photography.
 
Just in time for the last train of the day a coach carrying a group of German railway enthusiasts arrived and several photo run-pasts were organised.
 
By this time I'd exhausted both my sets of rechargeable batteries so had to sprint to the local Morrison's supermarket, buy a set of Duracell batteries, then run back to the station just in time to catch the train. Phew!
 
The results can be seen of Flickr at:
 
 
If you are ever in the UK a visit to the S&KLR is highly recommended - the stock is interesting, the scenery varied and different to every other preserved railway I've been to. The volunteers bent over backwards to show me round, explain everything and were friendly and chatty.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly




Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT [1 Attachment]

David Halfpenny
 


On 13 Jun 2015, at 03:51, Frank Stamford frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:


I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.


Frank,

Ariel and Puck of the Billerica and Bedford RR went into service in 1877, so they aren’t exactly earlier, but they were definitely flangeless on the driving axle (the one next to the cab), and emphatically designed to run cab-forward (see ‘cow-catcher’ and main headlamp - and on the two foot way as well. 

Note from the Scale of feet on the drawing that the effective wheelbase (centre of Bissell truck to the coupled axle) is only 12 feet.

David



Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT

John Peterson
 

Yes; being able to look at the pictures helps. The description has many of features and rationale of the Forney but seems a weird development of the original when you see the pictures as Frank points out.  

 

Forney's patent is 53406; wasn't able to get anything on line but someone in the US must have or know about the original patent.

 

Frank, you might be interested in the Finnish picture:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0-4-4T

 

Cheers

John P


From: LRRSA@... [LRRSA@...]
Sent: Saturday, 13 June 2015 6:55 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] the SA V class 0-4-4RT

 

On 13/06/2015 3:45 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

Really interesting Frank; wondering why the idea didn't catch on more. Calthorp developed a whole railway system based on an axle load of 5 tones for India but didn't use this idea for his steam locos.

 

The patent [dated 1882] for Forney's loco is here:

 

http://www.google.com/patents/US266685

 


That is a patent for a different kind of Forney locomotive - a (very strange) type of which I do not know of any built examples. I think the Forney patent for the type of locomotives used on the New York elevated railways dates from 1865 or 1866.

Regards,

Frank


Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss, damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender, and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Training.


Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT

Frank Stamford
 

On 13/06/2015 3:45 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
�

Really interesting Frank; wondering why the idea didn't catch on more. Calthorp developed a whole railway system based on an axle load of 5 tones for India but didn't use this idea for his steam locos.

�

The patent [dated 1882] for Forney's loco is here:

�

http://www.google.com/patents/US266685

�


That is a patent for a different kind of Forney locomotive - a (very strange) type of which I do not know of any built examples. I think the Forney patent for the type of locomotives used on the New York elevated railways dates from 1865 or 1866.

Regards,

Frank



Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT [1 Attachment]

John Peterson
 

Really interesting Frank; wondering why the idea didn't catch on more. Calthorp developed a whole railway system based on an axle load of 5 tones for India but didn't use this idea for his steam locos.

 

The patent [dated 1882] for Forney's loco is here:

 

http://www.google.com/patents/US266685

 

 

I've gone through it quickly [flat out doing stuff for work] but couldn't find a flangeless driveing wheel mentioned. The patent sems to cover having driving wheels in front of the ashpan and rear single or bogie at rear with the water and fuel supply. There is mention of springs to transfer weight between the rear and front of the loco but unsure of the point of this given the design being built to the maximum for axle load. For lines with different rail weights?

 

Cheers

John PT


From: LRRSA@... [LRRSA@...]
Sent: Saturday, 13 June 2015 1:01 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] the SA V class 0-4-4RT [1 Attachment]

 
[Attachment(s) from Frank Stamford included below]

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

 

Are there any other RT of note?


 

I have been doing some more probing on the SAR V class 0-4-4Ts, a class of locomotives which I have always found most intriguing.

It seems there was one other class of 0-4-4 back-tanks in Australia. In 1880 the Holdfast Bay Railway Company (South Australia) obtained two 5ft 3in gauge 0-4-4Ts with back tanks, specifically designed to cope with heavy excursion traffic on their North Terrace (Adelaide) to Glenelg railway. The locos came from Beyer Peacock and the HBR requested 4-4-0Ts with a maximum axle load of 8.5 tons for 50 lb rails. The weight distribution problem could only be solved by making them 0-4-4T back tanks. Unlike other Forney derived locomotives, these had inside cylinders. They later became GD class of South Australian Railways and were taken out of service in 1925.

It seems to have been accepted over a very long time that the V class was purchased as a replacement for horses on the Kingston - Naracoorte line. This is misleading. The decision to work the line with steam was made while the line was still under construction, and the order for the locomotives was placed during the line's construction. It is true that an informal arrangement was made when the rails had reached Naracoorte for private individuals to use their own horses to haul produce on the railway, but the SAR never ran a service with horses, V class locomotives were used from the time the line was officially opened.

With regard to the flangeless driving wheels on the Forneys, only the earliest Forneys used on the New York elevated railways (of which there were a number, operated by different companies) had flangeless drivers, later ones had flanges on all wheels (and obviously controlled side movement on the bogies). Similarly, not all the Maine 2ft Forneys had flanges on all wheels, some of the first ones had flangeless drivers.

I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.

Regards,

Frank

Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss, damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender, and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Training.

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