Date   

Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT [1 Attachment]

David Halfpenny
 


On 13 Jun 2015, at 03:51, Frank Stamford frank.stamford@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:


I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.


Frank,

Ariel and Puck of the Billerica and Bedford RR went into service in 1877, so they aren’t exactly earlier, but they were definitely flangeless on the driving axle (the one next to the cab), and emphatically designed to run cab-forward (see ‘cow-catcher’ and main headlamp - and on the two foot way as well. 

Note from the Scale of feet on the drawing that the effective wheelbase (centre of Bissell truck to the coupled axle) is only 12 feet.

David



Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT

John Peterson
 

Yes; being able to look at the pictures helps. The description has many of features and rationale of the Forney but seems a weird development of the original when you see the pictures as Frank points out.  

 

Forney's patent is 53406; wasn't able to get anything on line but someone in the US must have or know about the original patent.

 

Frank, you might be interested in the Finnish picture:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0-4-4T

 

Cheers

John P


From: LRRSA@... [LRRSA@...]
Sent: Saturday, 13 June 2015 6:55 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] the SA V class 0-4-4RT

 

On 13/06/2015 3:45 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

Really interesting Frank; wondering why the idea didn't catch on more. Calthorp developed a whole railway system based on an axle load of 5 tones for India but didn't use this idea for his steam locos.

 

The patent [dated 1882] for Forney's loco is here:

 

http://www.google.com/patents/US266685

 


That is a patent for a different kind of Forney locomotive - a (very strange) type of which I do not know of any built examples. I think the Forney patent for the type of locomotives used on the New York elevated railways dates from 1865 or 1866.

Regards,

Frank


Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss, damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender, and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Training.


Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT

Frank Stamford
 

On 13/06/2015 3:45 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
�

Really interesting Frank; wondering why the idea didn't catch on more. Calthorp developed a whole railway system based on an axle load of 5 tones for India but didn't use this idea for his steam locos.

�

The patent [dated 1882] for Forney's loco is here:

�

http://www.google.com/patents/US266685

�


That is a patent for a different kind of Forney locomotive - a (very strange) type of which I do not know of any built examples. I think the Forney patent for the type of locomotives used on the New York elevated railways dates from 1865 or 1866.

Regards,

Frank



Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT [1 Attachment]

John Peterson
 

Really interesting Frank; wondering why the idea didn't catch on more. Calthorp developed a whole railway system based on an axle load of 5 tones for India but didn't use this idea for his steam locos.

 

The patent [dated 1882] for Forney's loco is here:

 

http://www.google.com/patents/US266685

 

 

I've gone through it quickly [flat out doing stuff for work] but couldn't find a flangeless driveing wheel mentioned. The patent sems to cover having driving wheels in front of the ashpan and rear single or bogie at rear with the water and fuel supply. There is mention of springs to transfer weight between the rear and front of the loco but unsure of the point of this given the design being built to the maximum for axle load. For lines with different rail weights?

 

Cheers

John PT


From: LRRSA@... [LRRSA@...]
Sent: Saturday, 13 June 2015 1:01 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] the SA V class 0-4-4RT [1 Attachment]

 
[Attachment(s) from Frank Stamford included below]

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

 

Are there any other RT of note?


 

I have been doing some more probing on the SAR V class 0-4-4Ts, a class of locomotives which I have always found most intriguing.

It seems there was one other class of 0-4-4 back-tanks in Australia. In 1880 the Holdfast Bay Railway Company (South Australia) obtained two 5ft 3in gauge 0-4-4Ts with back tanks, specifically designed to cope with heavy excursion traffic on their North Terrace (Adelaide) to Glenelg railway. The locos came from Beyer Peacock and the HBR requested 4-4-0Ts with a maximum axle load of 8.5 tons for 50 lb rails. The weight distribution problem could only be solved by making them 0-4-4T back tanks. Unlike other Forney derived locomotives, these had inside cylinders. They later became GD class of South Australian Railways and were taken out of service in 1925.

It seems to have been accepted over a very long time that the V class was purchased as a replacement for horses on the Kingston - Naracoorte line. This is misleading. The decision to work the line with steam was made while the line was still under construction, and the order for the locomotives was placed during the line's construction. It is true that an informal arrangement was made when the rails had reached Naracoorte for private individuals to use their own horses to haul produce on the railway, but the SAR never ran a service with horses, V class locomotives were used from the time the line was officially opened.

With regard to the flangeless driving wheels on the Forneys, only the earliest Forneys used on the New York elevated railways (of which there were a number, operated by different companies) had flangeless drivers, later ones had flanges on all wheels (and obviously controlled side movement on the bogies). Similarly, not all the Maine 2ft Forneys had flanges on all wheels, some of the first ones had flangeless drivers.

I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.

Regards,

Frank

Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss, damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender, and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Training.


Re: the SA V class 0-4-4RT

Frank Stamford
 

On 2/06/2015 8:09 PM, 'Peterson, John J' peterson.john.j@... [LRRSA] wrote:
�

�

Are there any other RT of note?

�

I have been doing some more probing on the SAR V class 0-4-4Ts, a class of locomotives which I have always found most intriguing.

It seems there was one other class of 0-4-4 back-tanks in Australia. In 1880 the Holdfast Bay Railway Company (South Australia) obtained two 5ft 3in gauge 0-4-4Ts with back tanks, specifically designed to cope with heavy excursion traffic on their North Terrace (Adelaide) to Glenelg railway. The locos came from Beyer Peacock and the HBR requested 4-4-0Ts with a maximum axle load of 8.5 tons for 50 lb rails. The weight distribution problem could only be solved by making them 0-4-4T back tanks. Unlike other Forney derived locomotives, these had inside cylinders. They later became GD class of South Australian Railways and were taken out of service in 1925.

It seems to have been accepted over a very long time that the V class was purchased as a replacement for horses on the Kingston - Naracoorte line. This is misleading. The decision to work the line with steam was made while the line was still under construction, and the order for the locomotives was placed during the line's construction. It is true that an informal arrangement was made when the rails had reached Naracoorte for private individuals to use their own horses to haul produce on the railway, but the SAR never ran a service with horses, V class locomotives were used from the time the line was officially opened.

With regard to the flangeless driving wheels on the Forneys, only the earliest Forneys used on the New York elevated railways (of which there were a number, operated by different companies) had flangeless drivers, later ones had flanges on all wheels (and obviously controlled side movement on the bogies). Similarly, not all the Maine 2ft Forneys had flanges on all wheels, some of the first ones had flangeless drivers.

I have been looking for an illustration of a very early Forney without success. So far the earliest I have found is an 1876 example, No.26 of the New York & Harlem Railroad. If anyone knows of an illustration of an earlier example I would be very interested. Note this example has flanges on all driving wheels.

Regards,

Frank


Re: OFF-TOPIC; more photos from the UK - Sittingbourne & Kemsley

Frank Stamford
 


Interesting to see this railway as it is today.

For some pictures of how it was in its industrial days, this webpage:

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/England_Siitingbourne_Kemsley_Railway_1968.html

shows some photographs of locomotives on the railway on 10 July 1968.

"Leader" has changed colour since then, and is now very much cleaner!

Regards,

Frank


On 12/06/2015 9:36 AM, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:
 

Hi all,
 
Over the past few days I've been in the garden of England - Kent.
 
Whilst there I went to see the 2'6" gauge Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway (S&KLR).
 
I spend a lot of time in Wales with The Great Little Trains of Wales - what makes the S&KLR so different is it is undeniably industrial. The line was built in 1905 to transport the raw materials needed to manufacture paper.
 
More more information please visit: http://www.sklr.net/
 
I visited the railway on Sunday the 7th June and the weather was perfect for photography.
 
Just in time for the last train of the day a coach carrying a group of German railway enthusiasts arrived and several photo run-pasts were organised.
 
By this time I'd exhausted both my sets of rechargeable batteries so had to sprint to the local Morrison's supermarket, buy a set of Duracell batteries, then run back to the station just in time to catch the train. Phew!
 
The results can be seen of Flickr at:
 
 
If you are ever in the UK a visit to the S&KLR is highly recommended - the stock is interesting, the scenery varied and different to every other preserved railway I've been to. The volunteers bent over backwards to show me round, explain everything and were friendly and chatty.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman



OFF-TOPIC; more photos from the UK

Michael C.
 

Hi all,
 
Over the past few days I've been in the garden of England - Kent.
 
Whilst there I went to see the 2'6" gauge Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway (S&KLR).
 
I spend a lot of time in Wales with The Great Little Trains of Wales - what makes the S&KLR so different is it is undeniably industrial. The line was built in 1905 to transport the raw materials needed to manufacture paper.
 
More more information please visit: http://www.sklr.net/
 
I visited the railway on Sunday the 7th June and the weather was perfect for photography.
 
Just in time for the last train of the day a coach carrying a group of German railway enthusiasts arrived and several photo run-pasts were organised.
 
By this time I'd exhausted both my sets of rechargeable batteries so had to sprint to the local Morrison's supermarket, buy a set of Duracell batteries, then run back to the station just in time to catch the train. Phew!
 
The results can be seen of Flickr at:
 
 
If you are ever in the UK a visit to the S&KLR is highly recommended - the stock is interesting, the scenery varied and different to every other preserved railway I've been to. The volunteers bent over backwards to show me round, explain everything and were friendly and chatty.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
Follow me on Twitter @mikenarrowgauge
Support the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly


Re: : RE: Re:: Download guide DNRM Maps and Plans

Petan
 

Updated Version 2 (May 2015) free map download site from DNRM (Department of Natural Resources and Mines) previously Survey Office Department of Public Lands. The original version on the LRRSA download site will eventually be updated but in the meantime this is the updated version with V2 (version 2) on the end of the file name Downloading DNRM Maps and Plans v2.pdf

This PDF is my wife Susan's work.

Cheers


Ballarat Gold Mining Maps

Stuart Thyer
 

The State Library of Victoria has recently completed digitising mining lease maps in the era 1870-90. They may (or may not) reveal a little on mining tramways for various workings.  http://blogs.slv.vic.gov.au/news/ballarat-mining-maps-go-online/


Re: Peter Neve OAM [1 Attachment]

Brad P
 

Howdee,

             Have sent a personal message.
But an award well deserved. Pete has helped me many times over many decades.
Sadly I only occasionally get to catch up, but the chat is always enjoyable.
  He is a lasting reminder of my era of the hobby.

Brad

On Mon, Jun 8, 2015 at 10:46 PM, 'David Halfpenny (gmail)' david.halfpenny@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from David Halfpenny (gmail) included below]

Seconded!


David 1/2d

Retired railway suspension engineer
England

On 8 Jun 2015, at 04:09, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

Congratulations Pete -- OAM,
 
A well earner recognition of your many years of dedication to railway heritage.
 
Noel Reed. Retired railway signal engineer.
 
From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Monday, 8 June 2015 8:29 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Peter Neve OAM
 
 

Mr Peter Hutton NEVE, Junee NSW 2663

For service to the preservation of Australian rail heritage.

Co-founder, New South Wales Railway Clubs Association, 1956.

Founding Editor, The Railway News Magazine for the New South Wales School Railway Clubs Association, since 1956.

Instigator, Railway Digest magazine, Australian Railway Historical Society, (NSW), 1963 and Voluntary Sub-editor, 1963-1980.

Contributor, articles and photographs and peer reviewer, Australian Railway History journal, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), and other publications, 'over many years'. Heritage Officer, State Rail Authority of New South Wales, 1993-1999.

Founder, Weavering Rail Heritage Consultancy, 1999.

Supervisor, Railway Heritage Store, Redfern, Office of Rail Heritage (NSW), 1999-2011.

Memberships include:

·        Member, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), since 1955 and honorary Life Member, since 1980.
·        Member, New South Wales Rail Transport Museum (Transport Heritage NSW), since 1962.
·        Member, Puffing Billy Preservation Society, since 1962.
·        Member, South Pacific Electric Railway-Sydney Tramway Museum, since 1964.
·        Member, Light Railway Research Society of Australia, since 1966.

Employee, Department of Railways, Government of New South Wales, 1959-1999.

 

John

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.5961 / Virus Database: 4355/9965 - Release Date: 06/07/15






Re: Peter Neve OAM

David Halfpenny
 

Seconded!

David 1/2d

Retired railway suspension engineer
England

On 8 Jun 2015, at 04:09, 'Noel Reed' noelreed10@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

Congratulations Pete -- OAM,
 
A well earner recognition of your many years of dedication to railway heritage.
 
Noel Reed. Retired railway signal engineer.
 
From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Monday, 8 June 2015 8:29 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Peter Neve OAM
 
 

Mr Peter Hutton NEVE, Junee NSW 2663

For service to the preservation of Australian rail heritage.

Co-founder, New South Wales Railway Clubs Association, 1956.

Founding Editor, The Railway News Magazine for the New South Wales School Railway Clubs Association, since 1956.

Instigator, Railway Digest magazine, Australian Railway Historical Society, (NSW), 1963 and Voluntary Sub-editor, 1963-1980.

Contributor, articles and photographs and peer reviewer, Australian Railway History journal, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), and other publications, 'over many years'. Heritage Officer, State Rail Authority of New South Wales, 1993-1999.

Founder, Weavering Rail Heritage Consultancy, 1999.

Supervisor, Railway Heritage Store, Redfern, Office of Rail Heritage (NSW), 1999-2011.

Memberships include:

·        Member, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), since 1955 and honorary Life Member, since 1980.
·        Member, New South Wales Rail Transport Museum (Transport Heritage NSW), since 1962.
·        Member, Puffing Billy Preservation Society, since 1962.
·        Member, South Pacific Electric Railway-Sydney Tramway Museum, since 1964.
·        Member, Light Railway Research Society of Australia, since 1966.

Employee, Department of Railways, Government of New South Wales, 1959-1999.

 

John

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.5961 / Virus Database: 4355/9965 - Release Date: 06/07/15



FW: Peter Neve OAM

Noel Reed
 

Congratulations Pete -- OAM,

 

A well earner recognition of your many years of dedication to railway heritage.

 

Noel Reed. Retired railway signal engineer.

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Monday, 8 June 2015 8:29 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Peter Neve OAM

 

 

Mr Peter Hutton NEVE, Junee NSW 2663

For service to the preservation of Australian rail heritage.

Co-founder, New South Wales Railway Clubs Association, 1956.

Founding Editor, The Railway News Magazine for the New South Wales School Railway Clubs Association, since 1956.

Instigator, Railway Digest magazine, Australian Railway Historical Society, (NSW), 1963 and Voluntary Sub-editor, 1963-1980.

Contributor, articles and photographs and peer reviewer, Australian Railway History journal, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), and other publications, 'over many years'. Heritage Officer, State Rail Authority of New South Wales, 1993-1999.

Founder, Weavering Rail Heritage Consultancy, 1999.

Supervisor, Railway Heritage Store, Redfern, Office of Rail Heritage (NSW), 1999-2011.

Memberships include:

·        Member, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), since 1955 and honorary Life Member, since 1980.

·        Member, New South Wales Rail Transport Museum (Transport Heritage NSW), since 1962.

·        Member, Puffing Billy Preservation Society, since 1962.

·        Member, South Pacific Electric Railway-Sydney Tramway Museum, since 1964.

·        Member, Light Railway Research Society of Australia, since 1966.

Employee, Department of Railways, Government of New South Wales, 1959-1999.

 

John

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.5961 / Virus Database: 4355/9965 - Release Date: 06/07/15


Fairfax Media's historically significant photo archives under threat

Geoff Potter <potgeoff@...>
 



 
 
image
 
 
 
 
 
Fairfax Media's valuable photo archives under threat
An accused fraudster has allegedly been selling-off parts of a priceless Australian archive he was paid to protect. The future of millions of photos from the nation...
Preview by Yahoo
 
 


On Monday, 8 June 2015, 0:41, Change.org wrote:


 
Change.org

Hello!
I've started the petition "Prime Minister of Australia | The Hon Tony Abbott MP: Dear Prime Minister, we ask you to use all your powers to have the nationally important Fairfax Photograph Archive returned to Australia from the USA where it is held by the receivers for Rogers Photo Archive of Little Rock, Arkansas." and need your help to get it off the ground.
Will you take 30 seconds to sign it right now? Here's the link:
Here's why it's important:
The photograph archive of the Fairfax News Media Company are a nationally important and irreplaceable historical resource  charting major Australian and world events for well over a century. The archive is in grave danger of being lost to the Australian people forever. This cannot be allowed to happen. The Collection is currently in limbo in Little Rock, Arkansas as a result of the digitising company entrusted with its care having gone into receivership. 
Please try to save this piece of Australian history created by an iconic Australian company with a history stretching back to 1831.
I started this petition because I am a local historian who recognizes the significance of this photograph archive for all Australians. Do we wish to see it broken up and sold online to the highest bidder (with the money going to America?) Please support me in my bid to protect our history. 
You can sign my petition by clicking here.

Please share this message
Thanks! 
Geoff Potter
.


Fairfax media archives make the headlines

Stuart Thyer
 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-06-07/fairfax-archive-photos-under-threat-from-us-company/6527162

For some reason, this story was very slow to reach Australian headlines. So much so, that Light Railways magazine has already reported it!




Re: Peter Neve OAM

BM
 

John,

Thanks for posting this item. We were aware at ARHSnsw that this award was in the pipeline; much deserved for a life-long dedication to railways and their heritage.

 

Bob McKillop

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Monday, 8 June 2015 8:29 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: [LRRSA] Peter Neve OAM

 

 

Mr Peter Hutton NEVE, Junee NSW 2663

For service to the preservation of Australian rail heritage.

Co-founder, New South Wales Railway Clubs Association, 1956.

Founding Editor, The Railway News Magazine for the New South Wales School Railway Clubs Association, since 1956.

Instigator, Railway Digest magazine, Australian Railway Historical Society, (NSW), 1963 and Voluntary Sub-editor, 1963-1980.

Contributor, articles and photographs and peer reviewer, Australian Railway History journal, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), and other publications, 'over many years'. Heritage Officer, State Rail Authority of New South Wales, 1993-1999.

Founder, Weavering Rail Heritage Consultancy, 1999.

Supervisor, Railway Heritage Store, Redfern, Office of Rail Heritage (NSW), 1999-2011.

Memberships include:

·        Member, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), since 1955 and honorary Life Member, since 1980.

·        Member, New South Wales Rail Transport Museum (Transport Heritage NSW), since 1962.

·        Member, Puffing Billy Preservation Society, since 1962.

·        Member, South Pacific Electric Railway-Sydney Tramway Museum, since 1964.

·        Member, Light Railway Research Society of Australia, since 1966.

Employee, Department of Railways, Government of New South Wales, 1959-1999.

 

John

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 


Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

Stephen Percy Larcombe
 

If you want details of sea walls, then Cheetham Salt at Geelong (Moolap) had a 2 foot gauge track laid along their see wall so that maintenance can be performed, there is in fact some old flat top trucks dumped off the edge to help protect the sea wall.
 
Yours
 
Stephen
 

To: LRRSA@...
From: LRRSA@...
Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2015 22:53:11 +0100
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

 
Also, mile-long embankment know as The Cob in Porthmadog, North Wales was constructed using a three foot gauge tramway and quarried rock was tipped into the sea.

See the illustration at the top of this page.

http://www.festrail.co.uk/fr_history_1.htm

Michael Chapman

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

"Brian Rumary brian@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk




Peter Neve OAM

John Browning
 

Mr Peter Hutton NEVE, Junee NSW 2663

For service to the preservation of Australian rail heritage.

Co-founder, New South Wales Railway Clubs Association, 1956.

Founding Editor, The Railway News Magazine for the New South Wales School Railway Clubs Association, since 1956.

Instigator, Railway Digest magazine, Australian Railway Historical Society, (NSW), 1963 and Voluntary Sub-editor, 1963-1980.

Contributor, articles and photographs and peer reviewer, Australian Railway History journal, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), and other publications, 'over many years'. Heritage Officer, State Rail Authority of New South Wales, 1993-1999.

Founder, Weavering Rail Heritage Consultancy, 1999.

Supervisor, Railway Heritage Store, Redfern, Office of Rail Heritage (NSW), 1999-2011.

Memberships include:

·        Member, Australian Railway Historical Society (NSW), since 1955 and honorary Life Member, since 1980.

·        Member, New South Wales Rail Transport Museum (Transport Heritage NSW), since 1962.

·        Member, Puffing Billy Preservation Society, since 1962.

·        Member, South Pacific Electric Railway-Sydney Tramway Museum, since 1964.

·        Member, Light Railway Research Society of Australia, since 1966.

Employee, Department of Railways, Government of New South Wales, 1959-1999.

 

John

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 


Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

Michael C.
 

Also, mile-long embankment know as The Cob in Porthmadog, North Wales was constructed using a three foot gauge tramway and quarried rock was tipped into the sea.

See the illustration at the top of this page.

http://www.festrail.co.uk/fr_history_1.htm

Michael Chapman

Sent from my Sony Xperia™ smartphone

"Brian Rumary brian@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance 
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc 
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action 
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

Greg Stephenson <greg.stephenson@...>
 


G'day Frank
 
Have a look at this
 
 
It was land reclamation undertaken at Brighton in Queensland as an unemployment relief project in the 1930's.  It's pretty well where Eventide Home is now.
 
Regards
 
Greg Stephenson
Brisbane, Australia

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 8:34 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: [On30] Maintenance railway running along levee bank

B.Rumary
 

On 06/06/2015 10:01, Frank Savery franksavery@... [On30] wrote:
Q. Does anyone know of  a situation where a narrow gauge maintenance 
railway or tramway ran along the top of the levee so that rocks, etc 
could be dumped into the river to help protect the levee from the action 
of the river. ???

I think that the US Corps of Engineers (who do most of the levee work in the US) had a fleet of small steam locos for such work. As to whether they ran lines actually along the top of the levee is not certain, but it seems the most logical way of doing tipping of earth.

There is also a government body in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that had a fleet of narrow gauge diesels for repair and building of flood protection banks ("levees") along the coast. Holland also seems a likely country to have had such railways, seeing how much work they have done on dikes over the years. Building up and repairing banks along rivers was also common along rivers like the Rhein and Danube - there was a system of narrow gauge railways along the Upper Rhein where it formed the border between Switzerland, Lichtenstein and Austria.

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk

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