Date   

Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

David Halfpenny (Yahoo 1) <tuppenced@...>
 

Brian,

The same function as the coils springs in similar positions on this Commonwealth bogie.

David

On 30 Oct 2014, at 17:21, Brian Rumary brian@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

On 29/10/2014 21:14, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:
When pressed, I was informed the do-nuts were part of the springing / suspension arrangements.
 
http://www.friendsofklr.co.uk/ and click on Owl provides more information on the loco.
 
 
Well the first link doesn't tell me much, but the second does! That page has a close-up of the do'h nuts which shows that they seem to be rubber "springs" that cushion the links coming down from the equaliser bars linking the axle bearings. Quite an unusual way of doing things and something I don't recall having seen before.

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr [1 Attachment]

B.Rumary
 

On 29/10/2014 22:26, 'David Halfpenny (Yahoo 1)' tuppenced@... [LRRSA] wrote:
It’s hard to tell from a photo, but when I was a railway suspension designer I spent an awful lot at Metalastik of Leicester.

Back in the early 1970s I had a Land Rover that had something like that at the ends of its old-fashioned leaf springs. Each end of the top leaf was curled around a rubber tube, which it turn had a metal tube running through it the take the shackle pin.

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

B.Rumary
 

On 29/10/2014 21:14, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:
When pressed, I was informed the do-nuts were part of the springing / suspension arrangements.
 
http://www.friendsofklr.co.uk/ and click on Owl provides more information on the loco.
 
 
Well the first link doesn't tell me much, but the second does! That page has a close-up of the do'h nuts which shows that they seem to be rubber "springs" that cushion the links coming down from the equaliser bars linking the axle bearings. Quite an unusual way of doing things and something I don't recall having seen before.

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: : Amusement railways of NSW

jimlongworth1952
 

Hi guys


The topic has not been defined precisely, deliberately to give me, the author, room to manoeuvre depending on what resources can be sourced.


I am looking for the gaily painted, home made, or well engineered scaled down, 7 1/4in to 2ft gauge lines to be found at amusement parks, fairs, zoos, museums, etc.


7 1/4in and 5in gauge lines as found in miniature engineering groups are excluded. They are intended to show off the engineering prowess of their builders. Standard gauge lines are excluded because they stretch the genre too far.


I await your offers of help.


Cheers

Jim Longworth



Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

David Halfpenny (Yahoo 1) <tuppenced@...>
 

It’s hard to tell from a photo, but when I was a railway suspension designer I spent an awful lot at Metalastik of Leicester.


This is from a very old catalogue, but it outlines the principles of bonded rubber/metal spring/dampers very nicely.

David 1/2d

On 29 Oct 2014, at 21:14, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

It's funny you should mention the 'do-nuts' as when I visited the Kirklees Light Railway I asked the very same question...
 
Apparently everyone asks the same question too. LOL!
 
I was told they were for the Leeds Guided Busway...
 
 
 
When pressed, I was informed the do-nuts were part of the springing / suspension arrangements.
 
http://www.friendsofklr.co.uk/ and click on Owl provides more information on the loco.
 
 
Hope this helps.
 
Michael Chapman

Follow the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly
Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
 
 

 
In a message dated 29/10/2014 13:15:43 GMT Standard Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

On 28/10/2014 02:23, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:
If you are a fan of strange articulated locomotives, you might enjoy the set from the 15" gauge Kirklees Light Railway.
 

Very interesting!
However I have a question regarding the black-painted loco OWL. This seems to be a mix of Heisler and Climax articulated types, but what are those grey "doughnuts" fixed to the bottom of the bogie frames, just inboard if the wheels?

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk



Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

David Axup
 

Owl is an interesting arrangement.  The modernsteam site shows the set up quite clearly.

 

Thanks for another interesting set of photos.

 

Cheers,

 

David  Axup

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Thursday, 30 October 2014 8:14 AM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

 

 

It's funny you should mention the 'do-nuts' as when I visited the Kirklees Light Railway I asked the very same question...

 

Apparently everyone asks the same question too. LOL!

 

I was told they were for the Leeds Guided Busway...

 

 

 

When pressed, I was informed the do-nuts were part of the springing / suspension arrangements.

 

http://www.friendsofklr.co.uk/ and click on Owl provides more information on the loco.

 

 

Hope this helps.

 

Michael Chapman

Follow the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly
Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt

 

 

 

 

In a message dated 29/10/2014 13:15:43 GMT Standard Time, LRRSA@... writes:

 

On 28/10/2014 02:23, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:

If you are a fan of strange articulated locomotives, you might enjoy the set from the 15" gauge Kirklees Light Railway.

 


Very interesting!
However I have a question regarding the black-painted loco OWL. This seems to be a mix of Heisler and Climax articulated types, but what are those grey "doughnuts" fixed to the bottom of the bogie frames, just inboard if the wheels?


-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

Michael C.
 

It's funny you should mention the 'do-nuts' as when I visited the Kirklees Light Railway I asked the very same question...
 
Apparently everyone asks the same question too. LOL!
 
I was told they were for the Leeds Guided Busway...
 
 
 
When pressed, I was informed the do-nuts were part of the springing / suspension arrangements.
 
http://www.friendsofklr.co.uk/ and click on Owl provides more information on the loco.
 
 
Hope this helps.
 
Michael Chapman

Follow the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly
Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
 
 

 

In a message dated 29/10/2014 13:15:43 GMT Standard Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

On 28/10/2014 02:23, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:
If you are a fan of strange articulated locomotives, you might enjoy the set from the 15" gauge Kirklees Light Railway.
 

Very interesting!
However I have a question regarding the black-painted loco OWL. This seems to be a mix of Heisler and Climax articulated types, but what are those grey "doughnuts" fixed to the bottom of the bogie frames, just inboard if the wheels?

--
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

B.Rumary
 

On 28/10/2014 02:23, chapmanmchapman@... [LRRSA] wrote:
If you are a fan of strange articulated locomotives, you might enjoy the set from the 15" gauge Kirklees Light Railway.
 

Very interesting!
However I have a question regarding the black-painted loco OWL. This seems to be a mix of Heisler and Climax articulated types, but what are those grey "doughnuts" fixed to the bottom of the bogie frames, just inboard if the wheels?

-- 
Brian Rumary
England
brian(at)rumary.co.uk


Re: : OFF-TOPIC - more photographs on Flickr

Michael C.
 

Thank you.
 
I realise this is quite an accademic group that does historical research so you might not appreciate my emals plugging photos in the UK...
 
With this in mind, and to try and get back on topic, I've uploaded some photos from Australia.
 
Here is an album from my last visit to Puffing Billy.
 
I've also uploaded a set from the Walhalla Goldfields Railway fom 2010.
 
Maybe it's just me, but there is something wonderfully romantic about exploring old railway trackbeds; that amazing sense that trains once trains ran here... and wondering if they'll ever return. Some of the shots of the old trestle bridges and trackbed beyond Thomson are very evocative.
 
The day I was there was VERY wet and quite dangerous and I was grateful Michael Leaney was free to show us the trackbed. I wouldn't recommend crossing that big bridge without exercising extreme caution.
 
Cheers, 
 
Michael Chapman

Follow the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly
Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt
 
 

 

In a message dated 29/10/2014 06:51:53 GMT Standard Time, LRRSA@... writes:
 

The cars certainly are classics; the open one is a rare Citroen Mehari, and the hatch is a Citroen Ami Super.

And luverly trainpix too, thanks again Michael


Re: : OFF-TOPIC - more photographs on Flickr

halfpilotstaff
 

The cars certainly are classics; the open one is a rare Citroen Mehari, and the hatch is a Citroen Ami Super.

And luverly trainpix too, thanks again Michael


OFF TOPIC - more UK photos on Flickr

Michael C.
 

Dear all,
 
I've been uploading more photographs to Flickr.
 
If you are a fan of strange articulated locomotives, you might enjoy the set from the 15" gauge Kirklees Light Railway.
 
 
And for fans of small industrial locos, I have uploaded a set from the WLLR. Not the Welshpool & Llanfair Light Railway, but the West Lancashire Light Railway - a tiny two foot gauge line.
 
 
Take a look if you're interested.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly
Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt


Re: Coffs Harbour Display

Petan
 

Manning Wardle locomotive shown on a breakwater construction train in the period 1915-20.   P.9  Light Railways 86 October 1984 Ships And Timber: A Short History Of Coffs Harbour Port And Associated Railways By John W. Kramer

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 


Re: : speaking of amusement railways...

Stuart Thyer
 

Eddie

Great find. The engineering is intriguing, is it possibly a small oil engine hiding under the steam outline? Single axle carriages, I wonder how they rode?


Re: Coffs Harbour Display

David Halfpenny (Yahoo 1) <tuppenced@...>
 

Excellent photos - may I ask the gauge of the wagons please?

David


On 27 Oct 2014, at 01:14, Brad Peadon alcogoodwin@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:

Howdee,

https://flic.kr/p/oRYwqG

Perched on a short section of rails on the Coffs Harbour foreshore are two wagons that were used for the building of the old Coffs Harbour breakwalls. They have recently been replaced on the foreshore after recent works saw the southwall rebuilt.
Scott Sachmo



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Re: : Re: the McIvor triangle

Frank Stamford
 

The ground conditions in the paddock where the triangle was laid enabled it to be laid with no or very little earthworks. The location was also where several roads intersected - it was a good location to pick up timber or firewood brought by road. 

To build a triangle at the water tanks would have required earthworks, which the company avoided if possible.

Frank


On 27 Oct 2014, at 9:40 am, "harveycr@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

I suspect there were multiple reasons for putting the Triangle where is is. One might be that the site was an outstation of Mitchells Creek, which was the major source of traffic, so the Company probably didn't need to pay rent.

Colin



----- Original Message -----
From:
LRRSA@...

To:
"LRRSA@..." <LRRSA@...>
Cc:

Sent:
Sun, 26 Oct 2014 23:38:40 +1100
Subject:
Re: : Re: [LRRSA] the McIvor triangle


 

In the early years of operation two locomotives were in daily use, one picking up full loads at the triangle, and dropping off empties. The other loco worked east of the triangle.

The loco coming in with full loads from the east would not necessarily have trucks in front of it, as the sidings were designed to facilitate gravity or fly shunting.

The triangle was practically at the mid-point between McIvor Siding and Mitchell's Creek, and was therefore well placed to exchange locos.

I suspect that in normal operations the triangle was used as two dead-end sidings. The locos would back their train into one siding, decouple, then pick up the other train from the other siding. The third point on the triangle gave the opportunity to turn locomotives when required. Why they would want to turn locomotives is not known, but the fact is they did sometimes turn locomotives.

I cannot think of any evidence to show that the company was thinking of extending in the direction of the third leg of the triangle at the the time the operations commenced, nor is there any reason why they would want to. It is true that they considered extending to Costerfield six years later, but that was only if they had been able to carry traffic for the Costerfield antimony mines, and they were not allowed to do this.

Frank


On 26 Oct 2014, at 10:53 pm, "Eddie Oliver eoliver@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

On 26/10/2014 22:40, starry44@... [LRRSA] wrote:
Scenario 1:  If one is collecting fulls and dropping off empties all along the line to Mitchell's Creek, and up and down various small branches, the return train is going to be a dog's breakfast by the time you get back to the Triangle, with some fulls in front of the loco and some behind.  So, after having stopped to take on water, we get to the Triangle and shuffle the loads around to get them all behind the loco for the ascent to the top of grade just before McIvor Sdg. 

Very likely, but why put the triangle there rather than (say) near the watering point, and why use a triangle rather than just parallel sidings? Would there have been any reason to want to change the left/right orientations of the wagons?

Scenario 2:  Maybe at the time the Triangle was built it was policy to run the loco one way between McIvor Sdg and the Triangle and the other way around beyond the Triangle.


Yes. this is a version of the opposite-orientations theory that Frank and I were debating. But again, why was that location a good place for the changeover?






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Re: Coffs Harbour Display

Brad P
 

Chris,
         Yes they would be the same.
  According to Scott they were moved to the current location due to work in the former spot.

Brad

On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 1:51 PM, gm4201@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

They look like the ones I photographed in the late 80s, I think they were out near the headland south of the harbour then.


Regards,
CS 



----- Original Message -----
From:
LRRSA@...

To:
<LRRSA@...>
Cc:

Sent:
Mon, 27 Oct 2014 12:14:35 +1100
Subject:
[LRRSA] Coffs Harbour Display





Howdee,

https://flic.kr/p/oRYwqG

Perched on a short section of rails on the Coffs Harbour foreshore are two wagons that were used for the building of the old Coffs Harbour breakwalls. They have recently been replaced on the foreshore after recent works saw the southwall rebuilt.
Scott Sachmo



--



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Re: Coffs Harbour Display

Chris Stratton
 

They look like the ones I photographed in the late 80s, I think they were out near the headland south of the harbour then.

Regards,
CS 



----- Original Message -----
From:
LRRSA@...

To:

Cc:

Sent:
Mon, 27 Oct 2014 12:14:35 +1100
Subject:
[LRRSA] Coffs Harbour Display




Howdee,

https://flic.kr/p/oRYwqG

Perched on a short section of rails on the Coffs Harbour foreshore are two wagons that were used for the building of the old Coffs Harbour breakwalls. They have recently been replaced on the foreshore after recent works saw the southwall rebuilt.
Scott Sachmo



--



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Re: Coffs Harbour Display

Chris Stratton
 

 

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Re: Hello from a new member

Brad P
 

Alan,
       Welcome to the group.
  Always fun to hear how people finally get bitten by the 2ft bug. Even the most anti-narrow gauge railfans appear to eventually succumb :-)

Brad

On Sun, Oct 26, 2014 at 10:21 AM, 'Alan Shaw' mbmr@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,

 

I recently came across this group and was happy to be accepted as a member.

 

My main interest is railway photography, and so far it’s mostly been the “big stuff’ around wherever I happen to be living: Tasmania in the mid ‘80s, Canberra and environs in the late ‘80s and since then mostly Queensland and the north coast of NSW. Growing up in Tasmania I was certainly aware of the lines on the west coast (enjoying a memorable walk with mates along the Mount Magnet tramway, and earlier the Mt Lyell formation) as well as the Ida Bay railway, I have to admit such lines never really took my interest. Even living in Queensland I have to confess the cane railways never really interested me that much.

 

This all changed this year. On a not-especially-successful sojourn to photograph trains on the Moura line, I dropped into Bingera mill with a mate on the way home and although it was very quiet, being in the off-season, I was struck by the accessibility of everything, in stark contrast to how everything on the railscene in Queensland has increasingly become very remote behind wire fences and a general attitude of go-away.

 

A few weeks ago I put this to the test with a trip to explore the Isis Central Mill lines and the lines around Bingera and Millaquin mills. To say the trip lived up to my expectations would be a huge understatement. Although oblivious to much of the history of what I was looking at, I loved the experience of train chasing cane railway style! I suspect I’ll be going back that way in a few weeks before the end of the season to have another look.

 

I think my contributions to this group will be limited to not much more than pointers to whatever I upload to Flickr that may be of interest here, but hopefully that will be OK. Other than that I imagine I’ll be sitting quietly in the back rows, absorbing the contributions from what is obviously a very knowledgeable and scholarly group of people.

 

Alan

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Alan Shaw

Brisbane, Australia

 





Coffs Harbour Display

Brad P
 

Howdee,

https://flic.kr/p/oRYwqG

Perched on a short section of rails on the Coffs Harbour foreshore are two wagons that were used for the building of the old Coffs Harbour breakwalls. They have recently been replaced on the foreshore after recent works saw the southwall rebuilt.
Scott Sachmo



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