Date   

Re: : Newmarket saleyards

neville conder
 

Where did the the bridge over the Maribyrnong River at Kensington fit into the picture. Its a pedestrian bridge now.
Neville

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2014 10:24 AM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Re:: Newmarket saleyards

 

G'day All.

I recall that the sidings were a fair way from the saleyards. There was a road with a
dedicated bridge over Smithfield /Racecourse Road where the animals were driven
to the salleyards. I can't find an old map that shows this unfortunately.

I do recall driving under that bridge in heavy rain, the cowshit dribbled through the
decking onto all them cars beneath.

Regards,

Bill
>
>
>
> Hi David,
>
> You're correct, the cattle and sheep sidings where were the supermarket, and also the curved
> block of flats that follows the showgrounds line trains now stand.
>
> The following links fro Mark Bau's excellent VR site will (hopefully) take you to the Newmarket
> track plan. http://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/flem1915.html
> http://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/flenrc1935.html
>
> There are some photos, I think on the Public Records Office website, that show the unloading of
> animals.
>
> Regards
>
> Ian J
>
>
>
>
>


Re: : Newmarket saleyards

Bill Russell
 

G'day All.

I recall that the sidings were a fair way from the saleyards. There was a road with a
dedicated bridge over Smithfield /Racecourse Road where the animals were driven
to the salleyards. I can't find an old map that shows this unfortunately.

I do recall driving under that bridge in heavy rain, the cowshit dribbled through the
decking onto all them cars beneath.

Regards,

Bill




Hi David,

You're correct, the cattle and sheep sidings where were the supermarket, and also the curved
block of flats that follows the showgrounds line trains now stand.

The following links fro Mark Bau's excellent VR site will (hopefully) take you to the Newmarket
track plan. http://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/flem1915.html
http://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/flenrc1935.html

There are some photos, I think on the Public Records Office website, that show the unloading of
animals.

Regards

Ian J





Re: : Newmarket saleyards

ianj0trains
 

Hi David,


You're correct, the cattle and sheep sidings where were the supermarket, and also the curved block of flats that follows the showgrounds line trains now stand.


The following links fro Mark Bau's excellent VR site will (hopefully) take you to the Newmarket track plan. http://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/flem1915.html

http://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/flenrc1935.html


There are some photos, I think on the Public Records Office website, that show the unloading of animals.


Regards


Ian J


Newmarket saleyards

Marie and David Lowe
 

Not a Light Railways issue, but.... 
My daughter has recently moved to the Newmarket area in Melbourne, so have become curious as to where the railway siding was for unloading stock. There are historic interpretive signs about the actual market and stock market style fencing on designated walks in the developed residential area, one informing the reader that cattle were herded along Market Street. From where, how?
Google informs me that trains were reversed from near Kensington to the siding and wagons unloaded.
Was/is, the Racecourse/Showgrounds line part of that siding which veers off just after Newmarket station? It seems it probably was where the supermarket complex now stands. South of Newmarket is a long embankment so the siding must have been to the north.
I would be very appreciative if some light could be shed on this.
 Thanks David


Re: 2ft Narrow Gauge Auction - New Haven, Indiana, USA

Geoff Potter <potgeoff@...>
 

On Google Earth, if you put the address in, you can find the property. Faintly below the tres you can see the track system.
Wish I was filthy rich, or even just rich would do!
Not asking much. 
Geoff


On Wednesday, 24 September 2014, 7:38, "'Bruce Rankin' brucerankin@... [LRRSA]" wrote:


 
This one came in from USA last night (for those of you who may have some money…).
 
If the image I posted doesn’t come through with the email, look at www.adamsauctions.com.
 
I know nothing more than what I saw on the advert and am just passing this on to anyone who might have an interest.
 
Cheers,
Bruce Rankin
 



2ft Narrow Gauge Auction - New Haven, Indiana, USA

bjr2105
 

This one came in from USA last night (for those of you who may have some money…).

 

If the image I posted doesn’t come through with the email, look at www.adamsauctions.com.

 

I know nothing more than what I saw on the advert and am just passing this on to anyone who might have an interest.

 

Cheers,

Bruce Rankin

 


Advert of the Week

John Browning
 

Three contractors locomotives for sale NSW 1883

 

-------------------------------------------

 

SALE BY AUCTION.

CLEARING-OUT SALE

Railway Plant

(Lately the Property of W. Wakeford, Esq.).

AT QUIRINDI

ON TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1882

at 11 a.m.

FOR POSITIVE SALE.

NO RESERVE.

TO RAILWAY CONTRACTORS and OTHERS.

NATHAN COHEN and CO. have received

instructions to sell by auction, without reserve,

at QUIRINDI,

on TUESDAY, MAY 15, at 11 a.m.,

The balance of the Railway Plant, consisting of

1 Large Locomotive

2 Small Locomotives

1 Adzing and Boring Machine

14 Furnace Bars

20 Engine Tubular Pipes

55 Ballast Waggons

2 Pile Engines and Monkeys

1 Stone Crusher

1 Steam Pump

4 Trolleys

1 Bolt Extractor

4 Pairs Wheels and Axles

3 Pairs Locomotive Springs

57 Wrought Iron Axles

52 Iron Wheels and Axles

12 New Lowmoor Iron Tyres

1 Steam Winch ,

49 Wheel Centres

47 Wrought Iron Axles

2 Clay Crushing Rollers

1 Large Wooden Tank

15 Wrought Iron Wheels

1 Pair Englne Wheels

Lot Sleeper and Earth Waggons

Lot Old Iron, &c.

The Auctioneers desire to state that their instructions

are to sell every line to the HIGHEST BIDDER, so that

persons on the look-out for Contractor's Plant, &o., should

take advantage of this sale.

Inspection invited at the Railway Yards, Quirindi and

Tamworth.

Date of Sale -

TUESDAY, MAY 15,

AT QUIRINDI, at 11 a.m.

 

Australian Town and Country Journal, 5 May 1883 p. 40. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70998834

 

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 


WHR Super Power

Michael C.
 

Dear all,
 
Last weekend the Ffestiniog Railway ran their Super Power weekend which featured double-headed NGG16 Garratt-hauled trains, demonstration freight trains and the last outing of K1 before the boiler ticket expires.
 
Several photos have been uploaded to Flickr and can be seen here:
 
Take a look of you're interested.
 
Cheers,
 
Michael Chapman

Follow the Welsh Highland Heritage Railway on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WHHRly
Follow my railway adventures on Flickr at http://tinyurl.com/nlvlnmt


Currumbin Sanctuary was Old photo

Petan
 

Thanks Kevin for this image plus the history from the Currumbin Sanctuary itself. As you said, the writer’s non rail terminology such as “Mikado design known as 2, 8, 2” is easily understood as 2-8-2. One puzzle for me is the description of the boiler as a wet leg design which he said means it has water circulating around in the walls that house the coal fire. Is that another way of describing the normal loco firebox and boiler arrangement of fire tubes going through boiling water or something different?

 

The gauge of 11&1/4 inches wide generally agrees with my measuring although I settled on 11 inches as it varied slightly in parts. Interesting he wrote the Blue Train was built in 1986 and is a replica of a Queensland coal and shunting train known as DH44. My first thoughts on seeing the blue hood loco when first introduced was the Victorian T class.

 

Cheers

Peter Cokley

 

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 16 September 2014 4:23 PM
To: LRRSA
Subject: [LRRSA] Fwd: Old photo [1 Attachment]

 

Whilst busily scanning as many of my late father's slides as I can before the colour loss is irreversible, I came across the attached photo. Without doubt this fulfils the criteria "light" as well as "railway" however I'm not convinced this is what the founders of LRRSA had in mind!!

 

It is the very earliest days of the railway at what was then known as the Currumbin Bird Sanctuary (now known as Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary) and was taken - according to the slide mount - on 21/08/64. MUCH has changed about both the railway and The Sanctuary.

 

With no cost to me, I flicked a copy to Currumbin for their archives. As part of their thank you, they sent the following text about the 50th anniversary of the railway. I thank praps you might be interested. Clearly it has not been written by an avid train enthusiast, but in that, it is interesting the things he has included in his description, and probably more so ... what isn't!

 

Anyway, here's the photo ... here's their text.

 

CURRUMBIN WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

    MINIATURE RAILWAY

By Dave Noble

The trains this year have been part of Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary for FIFTY YEARS.

Alex Griffiths, the founder of Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, requested the construction of a Steam Train in 1964 so people could get pleasure riding on the steam train around on a loop on the original side of the sanctuary. The track [now] is 2.5km long and travels along a winding railway through the trees and bush of the Sanctuary Wildlife Reserve. The track is 11&1/4 inches wide and BHP steel 14 pound rail, the track now with concrete sleepers was extended in 1974 under the Gold Coast Highway to transport guests through his beautiful Currumbin property. Alex’s property now known as Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary still operates the steam train and in October, 2011 this original steam train was fully restored to celebrate Alex’s 100th birthday Anniversary. Today this coal fired steam train continues to travel its way through the Sanctuary, delighting guests with the scenic journey and stunning views of the native flora and fauna.

The Locomotive was a compromise design from an American Baldwin locomotive No.A.C.16 and an Australian locomotive CC.17. The steam train was made by Brisbane Engineer James Jackson. The wheel arrangement is of the Mikado design known as 2, 8, 2. This means two forward wheels acting as leaders, eight driving wheels, and two trailing wheels in the rear bogie. The driving wheels are cast iron spoked fitted with cast steel tyres, the diameter being 290mm. The driving coupling rods are Baker valve gear design, the steam cylinders are 100mm. in diameter with piston valves.  The tender has two bogies each set has four wheels; this houses the driver’s seat, coal and water storages. The steam train is 4.5 metres long, 1 metre high and .6 metres wide. It is coil fired to produce the steam, operates on a boiler pressure 125/150 pounds per square inch. The boiler is a wet leg design which means it has water circulating around in the walls that house the coal fire. The steam locomotive develops 2.42 Australian standard horsepower and its gross weight is two tonnes.

The trains haul 8 carriages that can carry 66 guests each time they complete their circuit through the Sanctuary, stopping at designated stations along the way. A round trip takes approximately 20 minutes including all station stops. Joining the team of trains in 1974 was the Red Train. This was the first diesel train in the collection and is replica of the Commonwealth Railways train known as GM1 from Sydney. The Blue Train was built in 1986 and is a replica of a Queensland coal and shunting train known as DH44. To complete the current collection the Green Train also a diesel train, was built in 1994 and is a replica of a steam train No. 24 from Americas Sandy River Railway. All diesel trains are powered by four cylinders SD 2.2 horsepower Nissan diesels, coupled to the motors is a hydraulic pump, which produces 2,000 pounds per square inch of oil pressure to two orbital hydraulic motors mounted in the two, four wheel bogies.

All four trains continue to operate at different times throughout the year at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary.

 


Re: : Fwd: Old photo

Kevin Sewell
 

Are you able to provide a link to the Flickr site?

I probably have more photos, but Dad had thousands of slides and none of them were catalogued. This just happened to be one that I came across early in the process.


On Wednesday, September 17, 2014, jamesianmcculloch@... [LRRSA] <LRRSA@...> wrote:
 

I have a few photos by David Lidster of this loco and railway from the late 60's on Flickr, but I had no idea what they were and David couldn't remember. Now I know!



--
Cheers,
Kevin

I’ve reached an age where my train of thought often leaves the station without me.



Re: : Fwd: Old photo

James McCulloch
 

I have a few photos by David Lidster of this loco and railway from the late 60's on Flickr, but I had no idea what they were and David couldn't remember. Now I know!


Old photo

Kevin Sewell
 

Whilst busily scanning as many of my late father's slides as I can before the colour loss is irreversible, I came across the attached photo. Without doubt this fulfils the criteria "light" as well as "railway" however I'm not convinced this is what the founders of LRRSA had in mind!!

It is the very earliest days of the railway at what was then known as the Currumbin Bird Sanctuary (now known as Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary) and was taken - according to the slide mount - on 21/08/64. MUCH has changed about both the railway and The Sanctuary.

With no cost to me, I flicked a copy to Currumbin for their archives. As part of their thank you, they sent the following text about the 50th anniversary of the railway. I thunk praps you might be interested. Clearly it has not been written by an avid train enthusiast, but in that, it is interesting the things he has included in his description, and probably more so ... what isn't!

Anyway, here's the photo ... here's their text.







CURRUMBIN WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

    MINIATURE RAILWAY

By Dave Noble

The trains this year have been part of Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary for FIFTY YEARS.

Alex Griffiths, the founder of Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, requested the construction of a Steam Train in 1964 so people could get pleasure riding on the steam train around on a loop on the original side of the sanctuary. The track [now] is 2.5km long and travels along a winding railway through the trees and bush of the Sanctuary Wildlife Reserve. The track is 11&1/4 inches wide and BHP steel 14 pound rail, the track now with concrete sleepers was extended in 1974 under the Gold Coast Highway to transport guests through his beautiful Currumbin property. Alex’s property now known as Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary still operates the steam train and in October, 2011 this original steam train was fully restored to celebrate Alex’s 100th birthday Anniversary. Today this coal fired steam train continues to travel its way through the Sanctuary, delighting guests with the scenic journey and stunning views of the native flora and fauna.

The Locomotive was a compromise design from an American Baldwin locomotive No.A.C.16 and an Australian locomotive CC.17. The steam train was made by Brisbane Engineer James Jackson. The wheel arrangement is of the Mikado design known as 2, 8, 2. This means two forward wheels acting as leaders, eight driving wheels, and two trailing wheels in the rear bogie. The driving wheels are cast iron spoked fitted with cast steel tyres, the diameter being 290mm. The driving coupling rods are Baker valve gear design, the steam cylinders are 100mm. in diameter with piston valves.  The tender has two bogies each set has four wheels; this houses the driver’s seat, coal and water storages. The steam train is 4.5 metres long, 1 metre high and .6 metres wide. It is coil fired to produce the steam, operates on a boiler pressure 125/150 pounds per square inch. The boiler is a wet leg design which means it has water circulating around in the walls that house the coal fire. The steam locomotive develops 2.42 Australian standard horsepower and its gross weight is two tonnes.

The trains haul 8 carriages that can carry 66 guests each time they complete their circuit through the Sanctuary, stopping at designated stations along the way. A round trip takes approximately 20 minutes including all station stops. Joining the team of trains in 1974 was the Red Train. This was the first diesel train in the collection and is replica of the Commonwealth Railways train known as GM1 from Sydney. The Blue Train was built in 1986 and is a replica of a Queensland coal and shunting train known as DH44. To complete the current collection the Green Train also a diesel train, was built in 1994 and is a replica of a steam train No. 24 from Americas Sandy River Railway. All diesel trains are powered by four cylinders SD 2.2 horsepower Nissan diesels, coupled to the motors is a hydraulic pump, which produces 2,000 pounds per square inch of oil pressure to two orbital hydraulic motors mounted in the two, four wheel bogies.

All four trains continue to operate at different times throughout the year at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary.

 


Great Rail Experiences Tasmania Tour 28 Feb - 9 March 2015

sncs@...
 

Good evening Everyone, 


Following on from the successful GRET tour this year, another will be run in 2015.


Visiting all the major heritage rail operations in Tasmania, as well as the world renowned MONA (Museum of Old and New Art), the ten day tour looks like an interesting trip.


Details can be found on the ATHRA (Association of Tourist and Heritage Rail Australia) web page:


GREAT RAIL EXPERIENCES TASMANIA TOUR 2015 | Great Rail Experiences Australia


Regards, 


Scott  

 


WDLR Album

John Dennis
 

Hello All,

RCL Publications have released a wonderful and very comprehensive book covering the British light railway operations during World War 1.  The book is subtitled "A unique record of British 60cm gauge railways on the Western Front, March 1918" and has many full page photographs reproduced brilliantly. 

I'm pleased to advise that the LRRSA is now stocking this new book, at a price of $75.00 (with postage this is slightly cheaper than buying from the UK, that margin seemingly increasing as the Aussie dollar falls). Of course, the 10% members discount makes the book even better value when bought from the society.


John



Re: Salute To The Hudswells Book (Was : Re: Indexing)

atev40@...
 

Hi John,


I'd not previously heard of this 'Salute To The Hudswells' book, and will certainly be interested in purchasing a copy. Can you give any information on its availability to purchase (from the UK)?


Thanks and best regards,


Martin Best

 


Re: Indexing - was Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA

Frank Stamford
 

Hello Stuart,

That sounds good.

I thought my detailed response had fallen on deaf ears, and that maybe it had been too detailed.

I had hoped that someone would have responded who is not currently involved with LRRSA tasks, but that seems to have been a forlorn hope.

Regards,

Frank



On 13 Sep 2014, at 9:22 pm, "Stuart Thyer stuart.thyer@... [LRRSA]" <LRRSA@...> wrote:

 

Frank

As fortune would have it, i will probably have some down time in the next couple of months and would be interested in assisting.  I'll be in touch in the next couple of days. I did have a great number of questions over the whole process but your piece has pretty much answered it all.

Regards
Stuart


Re: Indexing - was Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA

Stuart Thyer
 

Frank

As fortune would have it, i will probably have some down time in the next couple of months and would be interested in assisting.  I'll be in touch in the next couple of days. I did have a great number of questions over the whole process but your piece has pretty much answered it all.

Regards
Stuart


Re: Indexing - was Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA book

John Browning
 

What Peter Knife says is very true. A computer can help but there is a lot of human intervention required. After all most words in a book will not be indexed, and someone has to decide which ones will be and which ones won’t.

 

In the past I used a program that listed all the words used in a book and the first step in producing the index was to cull this list to leave the words that needed to be included in the index.

 

For the book “Salute to the Hudswells” currently with the printer, I went through the text and identified the words (including concepts) that I thought needed to be indexed so this was prepared well in advance. When the final layout was done, I used a search facility to identify the relevant page numbers. This was a lengthy process, taking about 6 hours last week (for a 144 page book), which I wouldn’t have been concerned about had I been at home. However, it had to be done in great haste at very short notice and I was in Fiji at the time so it took a chunk out of my train chasing time.

 

Is it worth it? I agree with Richard Horne. For books that you are going to refer to for reference (an excellent example is ‘Rails through the Bush’) it is invaluable.

 

Unfortunately this isn’t always recognised, or it is seen as just ‘too hard’, leaving the final product the poorer.

 

John

 

John Browning

Brisbane

Australia

 


Re: : Re: Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA book

Frank Stamford
 

Hello all,

This reply might be rather long as the discussion seems to have raised three issues, why index?, what to index? and how to index?

I will try ro address each, but firstly I should say that I am not looking for someone to produce a 100% perfect index of the Simsville book. Rather I am looking for someone to start the process off, to break the back of the work. It will then go through a review and quality control process, and the final formatting will be done by me using Adobe InDesign.

Why Index?

I agree with Richard, I think an index is essential in any text-rich work of reference. I am constantly using indexes, and when I find books with no index or a poor index, I tend to curse the publisher for being amateurish.

But indexes are also very important to us for marketing purposes. We sell a lot of our books into the local history and family history market. Many people check the index of a book before buying. That is why we put the indexes of most of our books on our website. You can find examples here:
http://www.lrrsa.org.au/Lrr_Pubs.htm

A specific example of the importance of an index in marketing was the case of someone who called me wanting to buy ten copies of "Bellbrakes, Bullocks and Bushmen". Why? Because they had looked at the index, found a reference to one of their ancestors, and although there were only a couple of paragraphs in the book relating to that person, they wanted copies for various members of the family.

The local history and family history market is crucially important to the LRRSA. Without it I doubt that we could have survived, and we certainly would not have been able to finance a magazine of the quality of "Light Railways".

For that reason the index should try to meet the needs of a wide audience, not just railway enthusiasts.

What to index?

I also agree that an effective index has the be prepared by a human being, and cannot be computerised.

These are the sort  of things I look for to index (the list is not necessarily complete):

People's names
Company's names (including locomotive builders)
Names of towns and other significant localities
References to rivers, roads, creeks etc where significant
References to organisations where significant
References to locomotives
References to significant happenings, like accidents, bushfires, major strikes, special trains etc
References to rolling stock, and infrastructure where significant - eg major bridges, unusual buildings
References to significant community infrastructure - like post offices, halls, churches, sports grounds.

Note the word "significant" reappears constantly, so it is a matter of judgement by the indexer what to include. My feeling is that too much detail is better than too little in an index.

How to index?

LRRSA books are produced using Adobe InDesign. It has an inbuilt indexing facility. Some people find this useful. I find it extremely convoluted and tedious. Therefore I do not use it.

This is my method.

Start with a paper printout of the book. Commence reading from the start and use a highlighter pen to mark everything considered worth indexing.

Then in MS Excel using a one column table go from start to finish entering each item that has been highlighted followed by its page number.

When this process is completed, sort the column into alphabetical order.

[If someone would volunteer to do the indexing process to that stage, it would be a great help].

The next stage is to copy the one-column Excel table into MS Word, and work through it from start to finish consolidating the entries and making their presentation more rational. I will not go into the details here, it is a bit too involved.

The final stages are to convert the MS Word table to text, take it into Adobe InDesign and apply the appropriate formatting and typographical rules.

Regards

Frank
.


Re: Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA book

Geoff Potter <potgeoff@...>
 

Sorry,
hope I haven't started arguments, just thought that this may provide an option. 
Geoff


On Friday, 12 September 2014, 18:06, "richard horne rthorne475@... [LRRSA]" wrote:


 
Sorry, Eddie, but I can't agree.  I find an index essential in any serious work and use such regularly.  The index in the LRRSA's latest book, Frank Stamford's 'The McIvor Timber & Firewood Company', is a good example of what is needed.  Perhaps Frank will advise on what process he used to create the index.

Richard Horne


From: "Eddie Oliver eoliver@... [LRRSA]"
To: LRRSA@...
Sent: Friday, 12 September 2014, 8:07
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA book

 
Does anyone actually use indexes in books such as this? I literally cannot remember the last time I did so.

But if one does have a need, why would a computer-generated one not serve the purpose?

Perhaps my perception is prejudiced by the fact that I have seen very few indexes that could even remotely be deemed to meet Peter's requirement to record the location of 'ideas' - and there is also the problem that the indexer's way of 'coding' the 'ideas' may not correspond with how a user does so.


On 12/09/2014 16:40, 'Peter Knife' pjknife@... [LRRSA] wrote:


Having been through the exercise several times, I totally agree with the introduction to indexing in Adobe’s InDesign documentation:
 
“Sitting down and indexing a book is the most painful, horrible, mind-numbing activity you could ever wish on your worst enemy. And yet, where this is the kind of task that a computer should be great at, it’s actually impossible for a computer to do a good job of indexing a book by itself. A good index requires careful thought, an understanding of the subject matter, and an ability to keep the whole project in your head at all times. In short, it requires comprehension.”  Then later, talking about a computer-generated index: “This is not an index; it’s a concordance. A concordance records the location of words; an index records the location of ideas.”
 
A software-generated index can provide a bit of a starting point for a simple book, but requires a fair bit of manual intervention to come up with something useful. To create a really good index, a “meaty” volume really needs to be indexed manually by someone who understands the subject.
 
Getting off my soapbox now J
 
Cheers,
Peter
 
 
From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...]
Sent: Friday, 12 September 2014 1:00 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Simsville and the Jarrah Mill - forthcoming LRRSA book
 
 
Frank,
 
I recently had a book published and the people who put the book together used an indexing program. It wasn't perfect and needed tweaking, but helped greatly to move the project along.
 
I have just goggled "Book indexing software"and there are a few options there.
Hope this helps,
regards
Geoff Potter
 
On Friday, 12 September 2014, 11:33, "frank.stamford@... [LRRSA]" wrote:
 
 
Hello all,

The next book to be published by the LRRSA will be "Simmsville and the Jarrah Mill", by Ian McNeil. It describes the timber milling operations and 3ft 6 in gauge timber tramways centered on Simsville, near Port Stephens on the New South Wales lower north coast.

The book will be of 96 pages A4 size, and the design and layout is ready for the printer - except that it still needs an index.

Do we have any volunteers prepared to undertake the task of indexing this book?

There are two other books in the queue waiting behind this book, and if we can find a volunteer to index Simsville, it will help to bring the other two closer to the printer. One of these books relates to Tasmania, and the other to New South Wales.

Regards,

Frank
 





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