Date   

Re: Cane train oddity, 1929

Christopher Hart
 

This was the subject of an article or some correspondence in "Light Railways" some years ago and took place on the Babinda Mill network. The loco is a Fowler and the cow under it was the obvious cause of the derailment,
Chris.

On 19 February 2013 23:18, tawonga996 <gin78205@...> wrote:
 

I've placed a photo I found recently entitled 'Cane train oddity'in the Photos section of a near disaster for a cane loco. Can anyone identify the loco and/or the location?

Graeme  


Cane train oddity, 1929

Graeme Inglis
 

I've placed a photo I found recently entitled 'Cane train oddity'in the Photos section of a near disaster for a cane loco. Can anyone identify the loco and/or the location?

Graeme


Re: BURRA

John Garaty
 

Hi John,
Burra is parked at present up the middle of 5 Road in the shed in a very dark spot most unsuited for photographs.
Some rough dimensions at the firebox end are:
32" approx width over the firebox cladding
Grate 15" long, 26" approx wide.

I also had a brief chat with our engineer in charge of Burra's restoration. His opinion after looking at the same photo I quoted in the previous link, is that the original firebox was wider than the frames and that the strengthers were original.
Regards,
John Garaty
Member ILRMS

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "John Browning" <ceo8@...> wrote:

British narrow gauge historian Mark Smithers recently raised a question on a
blog entry. It concerns the 2ft. gauge Hawthorn Leslie 0-4-0ST BURRA of 1923
now at the Illawarra Light Railway in NSW, previously at Corrimal Colliery.
This locomotive now has a wide firebox and cast strengtheners on the rear
parts of the frames. I believe it received a new boiler from Clyde in 1946.
As built did it have a narrow firebox?



John


Re: Tramways of the Mornington Peninsula

silvansau
 

Hi John,
That walking track would be the Two Bays and is at the western end of Bunurong track. My old Broadbents I left with the Historical Society so will have a look when next there.
Cheers,
Keith.

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, John Cleverdon <johnc@...> wrote:

My father dug out a copy of a Broadbents guide to the Mornington
Peninsula from around the 1960's.
It shows a quarry on Latrobe Parade above Anthony's Nose. As well, the
current Bunurong Track (the 'back route' between Dromana and McCrae) is
labelled as 'Quarry Road'.

Keith, I assume the walking track you are referring to is Two Bays
Track? (I haven't wandered along it for a couple of years or more).

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon, B John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria


Re: BURRA

John Garaty
 

Hi John & all,
One of the few photos known of Burra as built and in service at Corrimal is available online through the Illawarra Coke web archive at

<http://www.illawarracoke.com.au/1912-65%20Corrimal%20Colliery%20Railway/pages/1934%20c%20Corrimal%20mine%20%60Burra'%202ft%20gauge%200-4-OST%20R_W_H_L_%20Bn%203574%201923_jpg.htm>

This 1934 photo with the original boiler appears to show the cast plates/strengtheners behind the rear driver supporting the firebox. My feeling is that "Burra" was built with "wide" firebox and these strengtheners were retained to carry the later Clyde boiler. My feeling is that the Clyde boiler was supposed to be a copy of the original boiler. I seriously doubt that you could build a boiler with smaller internal dimensions and still be able to move 30 tons of coal with every 8th axle spragged (as was done at Corrimal). The overall dimensions of the boiler and grate area are very small. I will check the grate area later today for you and get back with some dimensions this evening.

My understanding is that Clyde didn't get the boiler right first time which led to delays. Either impending boiler trouble with Burra or the delay in getting the new boiler almost certainly led to the purchase of the the Robert Hudson from Tasmania as a stop-gap during WW2. There is a comment about Burra's protracted boiler problems in Ken McCarthy's "Gazeteer of Illawarra Industrial Steam Locomotives". The dome on the current boiler is further back than the original and it impinged on the cab front. I don't know what other problems there may have been with the Clyde boiler. There are construction photos of the Clyde boiler available online through the Clyde Photograph Collection held at the Powerhouse Museum. A quick search of the Powerhouse website should turn them up.

I hope that this helps resolve the question from the UK.
Regards,
John Garaty
ILRMS member

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "John Browning" <ceo8@...> wrote:

British narrow gauge historian Mark Smithers recently raised a question on a
blog entry. It concerns the 2ft. gauge Hawthorn Leslie 0-4-0ST BURRA of 1923
now at the Illawarra Light Railway in NSW, previously at Corrimal Colliery.
This locomotive now has a wide firebox and cast strengtheners on the rear
parts of the frames. I believe it received a new boiler from Clyde in 1946.
As built did it have a narrow firebox?



John


Re: Tramways of the Mornington Peninsula

John Cleverdon <johnc@...>
 

My father dug out a copy of a Broadbents guide to the Mornington Peninsula from around the 1960's.
It shows a quarry on Latrobe Parade above Anthony's Nose. As well, the current Bunurong Track (the 'back route' between Dromana and McCrae) is labelled as 'Quarry Road'.

Keith, I assume the walking track you are referring to is Two Bays Track? (I haven't wandered along it for a couple of years or more).

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria


Re: Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?

Mike Bickford <mikebickford@...>
 

Oops, meant 2012.
 
Mike B
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2013 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?

24 April *this* year?  You looking into the future, Mike?

John

On 15 February 2013 20:58, Mike Bickford <mikebickford@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bob,

There was a message series starting on 24 April this year regarding 'Pennant
Hills Wharf'.
Have a look at that one & the following messages.



BURRA

John Browning
 

British narrow gauge historian Mark Smithers recently raised a question on a blog entry. It concerns the 2ft. gauge Hawthorn Leslie 0-4-0ST BURRA of 1923 now at the Illawarra Light Railway in NSW, previously at Corrimal Colliery. This locomotive now has a wide firebox and cast strengtheners on the rear parts of the frames. I believe it received a new boiler from Clyde in 1946. As built did it have a narrow firebox?

 

     John

 


Re: Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?

John Dennis
 

24 April *this* year?  You looking into the future, Mike?

John


On 15 February 2013 20:58, Mike Bickford <mikebickford@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bob,

There was a message series starting on 24 April this year regarding 'Pennant
Hills Wharf'.
Have a look at that one & the following messages.



Re: Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?

Mike Bickford <mikebickford@...>
 

Hi Bob,

There was a message series starting on 24 April this year regarding 'Pennant Hills Wharf'.
Have a look at that one & the following messages.

Mike Bickford
Harden NSW
Australia

----- Original Message -----
From: <eoliver@iprimus.com.au>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au>
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2013 11:39 AM
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?


there is a previous thread on this topic maybe about two years ago (?)

the groups search function appears unreliable at present but should be able
to assist when it is working properly




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Re: Tramways of the Mornington Peninsula

silvansau
 

Hi all,
A few years ago I researched the Shoreham Pier and it was built in 1870. I have a couple of photo`s of it but there is no sign of a tramway.
A couple of years ago at the Flinders and District Annual Meeting a local gave a talk on the early days of Shoreham and circa 1860 there was a tramway on an early map with a mill on Stony Creek and jetty.
Stony Creek right up to Red Hill South had never been milled but my uncle told me that all the valley there was tree stumps. So all the timber was dragged down to Shoreham.
Henry Tuck the early settler in the next valley Mantons Creek wrote a poem and part of it is....
At Stony Creek long years ago
When bullocks held the sway
When land was little worth
Without a team or dray
It was a wondrous sight to see
When twenty teams and fifty men
When Sleepers drew and sleepers hewed
For Sandridge Railway then.
From The Men Who Blazed Th Track......
....He believed they were the first sleeper cutters for the
old Hobsons Bay Railway, and for Geelong.
The main timber from the Arthurs Seat Range was Messmate (Euc Obliqua).
The timber out of very old buildings the nails would break off when trying to extract them.
Now there was quite a few saw mills and if there is any enthuasom I will plot where they all were on a map.
Cheers,
Keith H.

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Phil" wrote:


--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "keith" wrote:

Hi all,
Dromana had a tramway where Latrobe Parade is at the top end it runs
into the walking track to
Arthurs Seat where a short way up is where the gravel was quarried and
a tramway constructed down hill to Anthony`s Nose and that old quarry is
still there. The gravel was railed down hill and tipped into the drays
below. A Mr Alnutt was the contractor and had the contract for the road
towards Sorrento.
Cheers, Keith H.

Many thanks for your info Keith,

It ties in with an advert I had previously noted in The Argus, 26 Feb
1924, relating to the sale of 70 chains of rails, plus trucks and
quarry equipment by a G.T.Allnutt of Dromana. (copy attached, I hope! -
if it drops off you can find it at nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1905585
in the 8th column)



Also looking forward to anything you may know of tramways over Shoreham
way.

cheers Phil Rickard


Re: Un-freezing

David Axup
 

G’day All,

 

In the article on the restoration of Mourilyan in the latest Light Railways on page 5 the author makes the comment that three injectors were frozen and that they were then stripped and “unfrozen”.

 

Does anyone connected with the project or familiar with it know what was used to do the “un-freezing”?

 

Cheers,

 

David  Axup


Re: Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?

eoliver@...
 

there is a previous thread on this topic maybe about two years ago (?)

the groups search function appears unreliable at present but should be able
to assist when it is working properly


Re: Industrial railways in Iceland

Kevin Sewell
 



On Fri, Feb 15, 2013 at 7:39 AM, Richard Holland <dickwho1@...> wrote:
The Iranians may hate our guts, but in return they got a fully operational railway.

Dick

Broken Hill


I'm not convinced the Iranians appreciate that they got the better side of that deal!!!! :-)  

--

Cheers,
Kevin

I'm giving up spell-check for lint.


Dundas Valley Quarry Tramway?

BM
 

I have been asked by a colleague to post a request for information regarding
the origins of Tramway Street in Denistone. A Wikipedia article on Dundas
Valley states that 'Thomas Mitchell' opened a quarry on the site that now
known as Sir Thomas Mitchell Reserve in 1832 and this quarry supplied blue
metal for road making into the 20th century. The metal was quarried by
convicts and transported to Ermington Wharf from where is was transported to
Sydney.

There is no information on how the stone was carried from the quarry to the
wharf. Does the Tramway Street at Denistone have anything to do with the
means of transport from this quarry?

Bob McKillop


Re: Industrial railways in Iceland

dickwho1
 

Don’t forget down our way Brian – New Caledonia.

 

This was occupied by the Australians, only for a very short time and in minimal numbers until the U.S. Army/Navy turned up.  After the fall of France Churchill et. al, were concerned that French Colonies in the Pacific may go ‘Vichy’.  However, sanity prevailed and they didn’t.

 

The Iranians may hate our guts, but in return they got a fully operational railway.

 

Dick

Broken Hill


Re: Industrial railways in Iceland

B.Rumary
 

On 13/02/2013 07:50, Phixer wrote:
And there was me thinking that only the Germans and Japanese were the
occupying forces in World War 2.
I think that Iceland was still a Danish dependency at that time, although it got its independence after WW2.

The British, US and Soviets also jointly occupied Iran in WW2, after we deposed their ruler Rezza Shah (father of the last Shah), as we didn't think he "was anti-German enough". We then used the country as a route to send aid to the Soviets. One of the (many) reasons why the Iranians now hate our guts.

We also invaded various territories belong to Vichy France, such as Syria, Madagascar, Algeria, Morocco & Tunisia, plus chucking the Italians out of their colonies of Libya, Ethiopia and Eritrea.

--
Brian Rumary
England


Re: Industrial railways in Iceland

Stephen Percy Larcombe
 

If you ever get a chance head out to Harbour Front Tower Two bus stop 14461
 
And the only piece of steam machinery I could find in that place. It was still earning a living up until the early 80s
 
You can get a good over all view of it from the cable car that runs through the tower building next to it. I do have a few more details photos of it if any one is more interested.
 
Yours
 
Stephen
 

 

To: LRRSA@...
From: rodhutchy@...
Date: Wed, 13 Feb 2013 19:53:50 +1000
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Industrial railways in Iceland

 

I am afraid I am in transit.  I flew from Manila to Singapore today after a week on Palau.  I have sighted an old railway line in Palau which I'll write up as a 'field report' and I did have ride on a monorail in Palau which can fall under LRRSA as an 'industrial' monorail. I guess I can write that up as a field report as well.

Rod waiting for QF10 to Melbourne.

On Feb 13, 2013 8:45 PM, "Stephen Percy Larcombe" <splarcombe@...> wrote:
 

I see that you are to quote "Rod Hutch currently in Singapore"

 

Is there any steam on rails hidden away in singapore?

 

Yours

 

Stephen


 

To: LRRSA@...
From: rodhutchy@...
Date: Wed, 13 Feb 2013 19:24:14 +1000
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Industrial railways in Iceland

 

And New Zealand invaded Samoa, ousting the Germans in WW1.  And there was a military railway in Samoa during WW2, I think.

BTW Frank I found  a historic railway in Palau.

Rod Hutch currently in Singapore.

On Feb 13, 2013 8:21 PM, "David R Axup" <daxup@...> wrote:
 
G’day DFrank,

 
The Brits actually “garrisoned” Iceland with the civil administration of Iceland still the sovereign power.  They were not an “occupying force” in the sense of the Axis Powers invading other countries – and you left Italy out of your “occupiers”.  And don’t forget that on the cessation of hostilities in both Europe and the Pacific the Brits and US did occupy Germany and Japan as did Australia in Japan.
 
Pedantic to be sure but couldn’t help myself.
 
Cheers,
 
David

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On Behalf Of Phixer
Sent: Wednesday, 13 February 2013 6:51 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Industrial railways in Iceland

 
 


> During World War II Iceland was occupied by Britain, and the website
> includes some details of railways built by the British during that
> time.
>
> Regards,
>
> Frank

And there was me thinking that only the Germans and Japanese were the
occupying forces in World War 2.








Re: Tramways of the Mornington Peninsula

Phil <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "keith" wrote:

Hi all,
Dromana had a tramway where Latrobe Parade is at the top end it runs
into the walking track to
Arthurs Seat where a short way up is where the gravel was quarried and
a tramway constructed down hill to Anthony`s Nose and that old quarry is
still there. The gravel was railed down hill and tipped into the drays
below. A Mr Alnutt was the contractor and had the contract for the road
towards Sorrento.
Cheers, Keith H.

Many thanks for your info Keith,

It ties in with an advert I had previously noted in The Argus, 26 Feb
1924, relating to the sale of 70 chains of rails, plus trucks and
quarry equipment by a G.T.Allnutt of Dromana. (copy attached, I hope! -
if it drops off you can find it at nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1905585
<http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1905585> in the 8th column)



Also looking forward to anything you may know of tramways over Shoreham
way.

cheers Phil Rickard


Re: Industrial railways in Iceland

Stephen Percy Larcombe
 

But perhaps they realised that they did not have the sea power to keep their occupying forces supplied?
 
Yours
 
Stephen
 

To: LRRSA@...
From: franksavery@...
Date: Wed, 13 Feb 2013 21:56:19 +1100
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Industrial railways in Iceland

 
Just as an aside. It always seemed to me that the Germans made a seriouis error of judgement in not invading Iceland  when they  attacked Denmark and Norway. Not up to their usual Teutonic efficiency. From memory Iceland didn't and hasn't any armed forces so it wouldn't have taken much.
Cheers,
Frank Savery,
District Manager, CIE Cildargan Section
also Owner, Operator, Chief Cook & Bottle Washer,
Lakes District Portage Railway
and King Island Tramway, Tasmania
On 13/02/2013 8:19 PM, David R Axup wrote:

 

G’day DFrank,

 

The Brits actually “garrisoned” Iceland with the civil administration of Iceland still the sovereign power.  They were not an “occupying force” in the sense of the Axis Powers invading other countries – and you left Italy out of your “occupiers”.  And don’t forget that on the cessation of hostilities in both Europe and the Pacific the Brits and US did occupy Germany and Japan as did Australia in Japan.

 

Pedantic to be sure but couldn’t help myself.

 

Cheers,

 

David

From: LRRSA@... [mailto:LRRSA@...] On Behalf Of Phixer
Sent: Wednesday, 13 February 2013 6:51 PM
To: LRRSA@...
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Industrial railways in Iceland

 

 



> During World War II Iceland was occupied by Britain, and the website
> includes some details of railways built by the British during that
> time.
>
> Regards,
>
> Frank

And there was me thinking that only the Germans and Japanese were the
occupying forces in World War 2.



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