Date   

Re: LRRSA Database Update.

Bill Russell
 

G'day All,

Re Data base Consider this:

It is basically a read-only data base, with probably only needing one
update ever.(When an item is added.) Given that you probabvly do not
need the sophistication of a full relational database with multiple look-up
abilities would a HTML table be sufficient, with the user using his/her
bropwser's search facility to discover relevant items?

This could be hung off the LRSSA's web site with very little trouble.

If you wanted the ability to sort by various fields then a slightly
more sophisticated dynamic data base using javascript may be what you
want.

If the latter is what you want I would volunteer to maintain it
following acceptable negotiations with Frank.
Regards,

Bill Russell

On 24 Nov 2006 at 13:32, Frank Stamford wrote:


Bill,

Yes it probably would, but that would need us to develop it.

Anyone on this list with knowledge of php/MySQL who would care to do a bit
of programming for us?

Regards,

Frank.





At 09:21 AM 24/11/2006, you wrote:

Frank,

You say that there are limitations to using the Yahoo database.

Might it be better for the database to compiled in isolation and become
an appendage of the LRRSA website.

Regards,

Bill Hanks

________________________________


Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"

Yahoo!7 Groups Links




Re: LRRSA Database Update.

Frank Stamford
 

Bill,

Yes it probably would, but that would need us to develop it.

Anyone on this list with knowledge of php/MySQL who would care to do a bit of programming for us?

Regards,

Frank.

At 09:21 AM 24/11/2006, you wrote:

Frank,

You say that there are limitations to using the Yahoo database.

Might it be better for the database to compiled in isolation and become
an appendage of the LRRSA website.

Regards,

Bill Hanks

________________________________


Re: LRRSA Database Update.

Joy <jloughnan@...>
 

-I also think that's a great idea, especially for when Yahoo is
playing up as it does sometimes.

-- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@...> wrote:

Frank,



You say that there are limitations to using the Yahoo database.

Might it be better for the database to compiled in isolation and become
an appendage of the LRRSA website.



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________


Re: LRRSA Database Update.

bll_hnks
 

Frank,



You say that there are limitations to using the Yahoo database.

Might it be better for the database to compiled in isolation and become
an appendage of the LRRSA website.



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Frank Stamford
Sent: Thursday, 23 November 2006 8:47 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: LRRSA Database Update.



Re the logging locomotives, this is a huge can of worms, and I suspect
it needs more than one database. Probably one for each state, possibly
separate ones for steam and internal-combustion, and even possibly
separate ones for regions within states.

I think it might be better to try something simpler to start with to
see whether the limitations of the Yahoo groups database will suit
such a project, and to decide appropriate headings.

Queensland seems a good starting point, it's about the only state
where possibly all of the locos have been identified. I will see if I
can make them into a logical list.

Of the other states, I don't know how much of NSW has been tabulated,
Victoria is fairly straightforward for steam, but a real challenge for
internal-combustion; Tasmania is very complicated - they built lots of
locomotives there; and Western Australia is huge but very well
documented as far as steam is concerned, and not well documented for
internal-combustion.

One of the major difficulties is that a lot of the locomotives were
home-made and moved around a fair bit, and often went through major
rebuilds. Such locos don't have the luxury of unique builder's numbers
to identify them, but they often have evocative names, like "Lumbering
Liz" or "Jingle Bells".

Frank

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ,
"Brad" <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:

Hi all,
With work winding down at the moment I have finally been able
to devote some time to our database section.
For our newer members who may not know about it. The database is
at http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/database
<http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/database> and is
available to all members of this Yahoogroup.
We are endeavouring to collect extensive listing on industrial
railway topics for the benefit of all members. Any of you are able
to make additions to the list and we would really appreciate it if
you could take some time to do as such.

Updates:

Today I added some more locos to the preserved industrial steam
locomotive listing and currently our records stand at:

Non-Air Hopper Locations! 75 records

Preserved Industrial Diesel Locomotives (Except Sugar Industry) 31
records

Preserved Industrial Steam Locomotives (exc Sugar Industry) 19
Records

LRRSA Member Contacts! 1 Record

I am hopeful of building some of these listings up over Xmas,
especially the preserved industrial steam one. Of course any help
would be greatly appreciated.

Also while at it I have added three more subjects to the database.
While I personally don't have a huge knowledge of mining equipment
and virtually none about logging, I am sure there are many out there
who could help.

Preserved Underground Mining locomotives!

Preserved Underground Mining Mancars

Australian Logging Locomotives!
Listing of all logging locomotives used in Australia (still exisitng
or scrapped)!

Anyway that is what I have been doing :-)

Enjoy
Brad


Re: LRRSA Database Update.

BLI BLI <alcogoodwin@...>
 

Hi Frank,
Have taken your suggestion of trialing a
state and as such the database section has two
listings for Queensland. These are for steam
locomotives and internal combustion.
I have to plead complete ignorance regarding
Australian logging railways, in fact I have probably
read more regarding American ones. This is probably
evidenced mostly by my not realising exactly how huge
a topic it actually is.
Anyway we will give Queensland a go and perhaps
gradually add other states. It would obviously be near
impossible to list every single one but it may help
many of us (well especially me :-) ) get more of an
understanding.
Of course mill built ones without builders numbers
etc would just have those sections left out.

Regards
Brad


--- Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com> wrote:

Re the logging locomotives, this is a huge can of
worms, and I suspect
it needs more than one database. Probably one for
each state, possibly
separate ones for steam and internal-combustion, and
even possibly
separate ones for regions within states.
************************************************
**** REOPENED: LocoShed Australasia Website ****
************************************************
http://www.geocities.com/steelhaven_ee/LocoShed.html
** Still much under construction to be a more newsy site!
** Australian Industrial Railway Operations/Preservation.
** Railways of the Fiji, Philippines and South East Asia



____________________________________________________________________________________
Cheap talk?
Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.
http://voice.yahoo.com


Re: LRRSA Database Update.

Frank Stamford
 

Re the logging locomotives, this is a huge can of worms, and I suspect
it needs more than one database. Probably one for each state, possibly
separate ones for steam and internal-combustion, and even possibly
separate ones for regions within states.

I think it might be better to try something simpler to start with to
see whether the limitations of the Yahoo groups database will suit
such a project, and to decide appropriate headings.

Queensland seems a good starting point, it's about the only state
where possibly all of the locos have been identified. I will see if I
can make them into a logical list.

Of the other states, I don't know how much of NSW has been tabulated,
Victoria is fairly straightforward for steam, but a real challenge for
internal-combustion; Tasmania is very complicated - they built lots of
locomotives there; and Western Australia is huge but very well
documented as far as steam is concerned, and not well documented for
internal-combustion.

One of the major difficulties is that a lot of the locomotives were
home-made and moved around a fair bit, and often went through major
rebuilds. Such locos don't have the luxury of unique builder's numbers
to identify them, but they often have evocative names, like "Lumbering
Liz" or "Jingle Bells".

Frank

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Brad" <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:

Hi all,
With work winding down at the moment I have finally been able
to devote some time to our database section.
For our newer members who may not know about it. The database is
at http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/database and is
available to all members of this Yahoogroup.
We are endeavouring to collect extensive listing on industrial
railway topics for the benefit of all members. Any of you are able
to make additions to the list and we would really appreciate it if
you could take some time to do as such.

Updates:

Today I added some more locos to the preserved industrial steam
locomotive listing and currently our records stand at:

Non-Air Hopper Locations! 75 records

Preserved Industrial Diesel Locomotives (Except Sugar Industry) 31
records

Preserved Industrial Steam Locomotives (exc Sugar Industry) 19
Records

LRRSA Member Contacts! 1 Record

I am hopeful of building some of these listings up over Xmas,
especially the preserved industrial steam one. Of course any help
would be greatly appreciated.

Also while at it I have added three more subjects to the database.
While I personally don't have a huge knowledge of mining equipment
and virtually none about logging, I am sure there are many out there
who could help.

Preserved Underground Mining locomotives!

Preserved Underground Mining Mancars

Australian Logging Locomotives!
Listing of all logging locomotives used in Australia (still exisitng
or scrapped)!

Anyway that is what I have been doing :-)

Enjoy
Brad


LRRSA Database Update.

Brad <alcogoodwin@...>
 

Hi all,
With work winding down at the moment I have finally been able
to devote some time to our database section.
For our newer members who may not know about it. The database is
at http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/database and is
available to all members of this Yahoogroup.
We are endeavouring to collect extensive listing on industrial
railway topics for the benefit of all members. Any of you are able
to make additions to the list and we would really appreciate it if
you could take some time to do as such.

Updates:

Today I added some more locos to the preserved industrial steam
locomotive listing and currently our records stand at:

Non-Air Hopper Locations! 75 records

Preserved Industrial Diesel Locomotives (Except Sugar Industry) 31
records

Preserved Industrial Steam Locomotives (exc Sugar Industry) 19
Records

LRRSA Member Contacts! 1 Record

I am hopeful of building some of these listings up over Xmas,
especially the preserved industrial steam one. Of course any help
would be greatly appreciated.

Also while at it I have added three more subjects to the database.
While I personally don't have a huge knowledge of mining equipment
and virtually none about logging, I am sure there are many out there
who could help.

Preserved Underground Mining locomotives!

Preserved Underground Mining Mancars

Australian Logging Locomotives!
Listing of all logging locomotives used in Australia (still exisitng
or scrapped)!

Anyway that is what I have been doing :-)

Enjoy
Brad


Re: puffing billy

BM
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Michael J
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2006 4:08 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: puffing billy


--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Russell" <bill.russell@...> wrote:

We also looked at a Senital Steam Railcar in Sri
Lanka at about the same time, but were also told "no thanks".
On an assignment in Sri Lanka (in February 1987) I had the honour of an
individual tour of the Dematagoda railway workshops in Colombo, for which
4-6-0 B2.213 was in steam and provided runs up and down the yard. The man
incharge of the steam loco restoration programme, ADA Abeysuriya, was my
guide and his passion for steam made for a wonderful day.

At this time the narrow gauge Sentinal railcar No. 331 had been renovated
and had made a trial run up to Homagama, but awaited approval for further
restoration work. Four narrow gauge Beyer Peacock J1/J2-class 4-6-4T locos
were still in service, but the remainder of the fleet was stored in the
workshops. I was advised that representatives of the Puffing Billy Railway
had inspected the locos with a view to purchasing some, but no further
response had been received. I documented a full list of the narrow gauge
loco fleet at that time.

Thus, the PBR would have been told 'no thanks' re the Sentinal as the locals
had plans for this. Whether anything more formal occurred re the J-class
locos might be explored further.

Four the record, I took a trip on the narrow gauge line from Colombo station
on a tain hauled by 4-6-4T J1.220 as far as Nugegoda, where a cross was made
with a Colombo-bound train hauled by Krupp 2-8-2DH NI.564, so I took this
train back.

Bob McKillop


Re: puffing billy - panorama lost

Phil Rickard <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Russell" <bill.russell@...> wrote:

And the final point. With a 17 car train those at the guard's end
hardly ever see the locomotive. Bigger may be impressive, but it is
not always better.

Spot on, Bill,

I remember in the sixties, even from the back of a long train you
could see the engine occasionally, and a highlight (for us kids) was
to see the whole train at the trestle bridge and the Landslide.

For God's sake, when is someone going to get in there with a chainsaw
and clear the whole lot! One looses the panorama and drama of the
Landslide if you can't see the front of the train from the back.
(imagine going around Batasia Loop on the Darjeeling and not being
able to see that it was a loop - see photo page 31, LR190)

Ditto above at several other spots on Puffing Billy - the jungle is
just getting out of hand. On re-opening day at Lakeside (1975) the
trains were clearly in view on the hillside, when viewed from the
station. You'd need a regiment of tree fellers with a spare week to
have any chance today.

These were some of the key highlights for kids and they have been lost
to the current generation. Don't get me wrong - I don't want the
lineside turned into a desert - I'd just like to see it like it was in
the thirties to sixties. In the really early years it was a bare
landscape in places - now it's the exact opposite.

cheers Phil


Sydney Observer Cover Photo - "Daintree"

Bill Bolton
 

The photo of a cane train on the cover of the November, 2006 "Sydney
Observer" magazine is Mossman Mill's "Daintree", hauling a rake of
loaded bins.

I feel I should know the specific location, as there is a high voltage
transmission line running up the big hill behind the loco, but its
been 8 years or so since I last visited Mossman and the location is
now eluding recall.

Cheers,

Bill

Bill Bolton
Sydney, Australia


Re: Early timber tramway construction methods questions

Chas Bevan <bevac@...>
 

Re the Agricultural College reserve.
I doubt that there was ever any intention of building such a College
at this site. Dookie and Longerenong Ag Colleges were initially
operated by the Council of Agricultiral Education and ares of land
(such as the one mentioned) in different districts were set aside as
a source of income for the operation of the Council and Colleges. In
1945 (my last year at Dookie), the Council ceased to exist and the
Colleges and land its duties passed to the Dept of Agriculture:
indeed, it has been suggested that the reason was for the Govt to
gain control of the land such as mentioned below.
Chas Bevan

--- In <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au,
"mcsawdust" <mike.mccarthy@...> wrote:

Michael,

I know the tramway reasonably well. Assuming the formation you know
of is immediately east of the Bateman Rd/Dalyston Rd intersection it
would have been the log tramway serving the Woolamai Sawmilling Co
Blackwood Mill. This was situated on the west branch of Archies
Creek just south of the intersection and worked from 1899 (the
tramway was being extended towards the site from 1894)to around
1905. A log tramway followed Archies Creek north from the mill for
about 3 kms.

From memory the mill may have been erected on what was once the
Agricultural College Reserve. The timber went out west to Bass
Landing. The tramway featured at least 2 inclines on its journey to
the sea. I've found sections of it in the past mainly between the
Dalyston/Glen Forbes Rd and Mill Road. Also in a gully above the
Woolamai Race Course. The Company had another mill near the Mill
Rd/Trew Rd intersection.

I wouldn't mind getting in there and having a look sometime. Could
you tell me who now owns the property?

Cheers,

Mike McCarthy
Mike,

The mill was known to locals in the late '70's when we purchaced the
property. You are right about the agricultural college reserve - all
the properties in the area had been held on lease for a number of
years against the college being built. I never knew about the inclines.

It is about 15 years since we owned the property, and 18 months since
I visited it last. I can't remember the name of the gentleman who owns
it now but he is quite approachable, and were you to knock on his
door, I'm sure you would have no problems in inspecting the route.
Some of the larger cuttings were on the back portion of the property,
and as such were on the northern log tramway. We sold that seperately
to a neibouring farmer, and I have no idea what his attitude to you
looking over the property might be. However the fellow mentioned above
seems to know pretty well everyone, as he works really hard on
landcare activities. He would advise you how best to approach them.

Cheers,

Michael

--
Regards

Chas Bevan. Kallista Victoria


Re: puffing billy

Bill Russell
 

G'day All,

I cannot speak for Puffing Billy, but I think what I say reflects the
gereral informed attitude.

Most second hand steam locos available OS are not near what we
would call operable condition. If we acquired them we would expect them to
earn their keep. Add to this that while any particular locomotive may be
exotic, interesting, a one-off etc. I think Puff would rather design and build a
new locomotive. If based on a known design there should not be too many
teething problems.

The Shay locomotive we acquired was "going" when we were given
it. Lon Wymond (ex PBPS Presedint) saw it operating. When we rebiuld it
there will probably be no old parts on it.

Regards,

Bill Russell.

On 22 Nov 2006 at 5:08, Michael J wrote:

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Russell" <bill.russell@...> wrote:

We did make informal approaches to Sierra Leone about 20 years
ago and were politely but firmly told to go away. I don't know if
we looked
at the ones in Nepal. We also looked at a Senital Steam Railcar in Sri
Lanka at about the same time, but were also told "no thanks".
What a shame about Sierra Leone, and for that matter Sri Lanka. Funny
how some authorities are happy to sell stuff for scrap, but not for
preservation. I understand similar problems are encountered by people
trying to approach the Indians about narrow gauge equipment.

By a miricle one of the Garratts (a 4-8-2+2-8-4) survives in Freetown,
and is fortunately being preserved. I understand a Sentinal is still
operational in Colombo but there is no longer any track for it to run on!

As for the Nepalese locos, this seems to be an off again, on again
thing depending on politics in Nepal. If PBPS is genuinely interested,
they might keep their ears open on that one.

Your points about train length are well made.

Michael




Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"

Yahoo!7 Groups Links




Re: puffing billy

bll_hnks
 

When the restoration of G42 was being considered, various scenarios were
envisaged as to how it would be utilized. Apart from various specials
it has proven itself to be an effortless performer when hauling the
Luncheon Trains and regular Pass trains with 16 or 17 cars by making
easy work of them. When an NA is used on a heavy Luncheon Train, you
know you have a big load, even when limited to 10 mph. Not so with G42.



At busy times like the summer holiday season, G42 is often rostered on
the Lakeside shuttles with 16 or 17 car trains that are frequently fully
loaded. This is when G42 really shines; doing what it was built for,
hauling large trains and eliminating double heading of NAs. With an
average seating capacity of around 25 per car, that's a loading of 400
people. Some trains out of 'the Lake', when people want to get home
with their tired children, seem to have a lot more than 400 on board.
The bulging NBHs attest to that!



Those 17 car trains are long and you won't see much of G42 from the van,
that's why I ride in the cab and swing the shovel.



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Bill Russell
Sent: Wednesday, 22 November 2006 3:40 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Re: puffing billy



G'day All,

Just because you have a big engine does not mean that you have
to haul big trains. G42 is more economical (fuel and water) than an NA.
Where a normal Puff load is close to maximum for an NA it is a doddle
for
G42. I don't know about the relative maintenance costs.

We do have an NGG 16 which is currently in pieces being
compared to the blueprints (purchased in 1973) and the drawings being
(converted to)/(used to prepare) CAD images. When this is done an
estimate of the cost of re-gauging can be done. My guess is that it
could
happen within 15 years.

We did make informal approaches to Sierra Leone about 20 years
ago and were politely but firmly told to go away. I don't know if we
looked
at the ones in Nepal. We also looked at a Senital Steam Railcar in Sri
Lanka at about the same time, but were also told "no thanks".

Running big trains implies big numbers of passengers. You have to
be able to accommodate these in toilets and resturants etc. Apart from
that
I imagine many tourists would prefer small intimate groups.

And the final point. With a 17 car train those at the guard's end
hardly ever see the locomotive. Bigger may be impressive, but it is not
always better.

Regards,

Bill Russell.

On 22 Nov 2006 at 3:00, Michael J wrote:

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ,
"crannyjohn" <peterson.john.j@...> wrote:

Hello all,

My train was hauled by DH31 but I had a chance to inspect G42 in
action. A fantastic achievement; amazing to watch. I have a
question.
The Garratt was introduced to increase train sizes; Is this how it's
used on Puffing Billy?? Or are the train sizes the same as the
NA's??

Cheers
John
I remember when the Garratt was being proposed for restoration (25+
years ago) there was an article in Narrow Gauge discussing how it
might affect trains. At the time one morning train had a much higher
patronage than other trains out of Belgrave, and it was suggested that
the Garratt could haul that train. It sounds as if that problem might
have been overcome with the double header already mentioned. At the
time the Lakeside extention was brand new, and I don't think Gembrook
was anything more than a fantacy.

The problem with scheduling a train to meet the Garratt's capacity is
what do you do if it is not available. The article proposed purchacing
one of the South African garratts, which has subsequently occured. Of
course it will be some years before this loco is available. In the
meantime the already extensive timetable PB runs must place some
stress on the loco fleet, with only 5 nA's, which is possibly the
reason your train was hauled by a DH.

Ironically there have been a couple of opportunities over the years
for PB to obtain 2'6" gauge Garratts. There were Garratts available
when the Sierra Leone Government Railways closed, and more recently
there were two Garratts available in Nepal. They were up for sale two
years ago, but are now part of a proposed tourist railway there.

Cheers,

Michael





Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and
the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members
of the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors
and opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any
LRRSA member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"

Yahoo!7 Groups Links




Re: puffing billy

Michael J
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Russell" <bill.russell@...> wrote:

We did make informal approaches to Sierra Leone about 20 years
ago and were politely but firmly told to go away. I don't know if
we looked
at the ones in Nepal. We also looked at a Senital Steam Railcar in Sri
Lanka at about the same time, but were also told "no thanks".
What a shame about Sierra Leone, and for that matter Sri Lanka. Funny
how some authorities are happy to sell stuff for scrap, but not for
preservation. I understand similar problems are encountered by people
trying to approach the Indians about narrow gauge equipment.

By a miricle one of the Garratts (a 4-8-2+2-8-4) survives in Freetown,
and is fortunately being preserved. I understand a Sentinal is still
operational in Colombo but there is no longer any track for it to run on!

As for the Nepalese locos, this seems to be an off again, on again
thing depending on politics in Nepal. If PBPS is genuinely interested,
they might keep their ears open on that one.

Your points about train length are well made.

Michael


Re: puffing billy

Bill Russell
 

G'day All,

Just because you have a big engine does not mean that you have
to haul big trains. G42 is more economical (fuel and water) than an NA.
Where a normal Puff load is close to maximum for an NA it is a doddle for
G42. I don't know about the relative maintenance costs.

We do have an NGG 16 which is currently in pieces being
compared to the blueprints (purchased in 1973) and the drawings being
(converted to)/(used to prepare) CAD images. When this is done an
estimate of the cost of re-gauging can be done. My guess is that it could
happen within 15 years.

We did make informal approaches to Sierra Leone about 20 years
ago and were politely but firmly told to go away. I don't know if we looked
at the ones in Nepal. We also looked at a Senital Steam Railcar in Sri
Lanka at about the same time, but were also told "no thanks".

Running big trains implies big numbers of passengers. You have to
be able to accommodate these in toilets and resturants etc. Apart from that
I imagine many tourists would prefer small intimate groups.

And the final point. With a 17 car train those at the guard's end
hardly ever see the locomotive. Bigger may be impressive, but it is not
always better.


Regards,

Bill Russell.

On 22 Nov 2006 at 3:00, Michael J wrote:

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "crannyjohn" <peterson.john.j@...> wrote:

Hello all,

My train was hauled by DH31 but I had a chance to inspect G42 in
action. A fantastic achievement; amazing to watch. I have a question.
The Garratt was introduced to increase train sizes; Is this how it's
used on Puffing Billy?? Or are the train sizes the same as the NA's??

Cheers
John
I remember when the Garratt was being proposed for restoration (25+
years ago) there was an article in Narrow Gauge discussing how it
might affect trains. At the time one morning train had a much higher
patronage than other trains out of Belgrave, and it was suggested that
the Garratt could haul that train. It sounds as if that problem might
have been overcome with the double header already mentioned. At the
time the Lakeside extention was brand new, and I don't think Gembrook
was anything more than a fantacy.

The problem with scheduling a train to meet the Garratt's capacity is
what do you do if it is not available. The article proposed purchacing
one of the South African garratts, which has subsequently occured. Of
course it will be some years before this loco is available. In the
meantime the already extensive timetable PB runs must place some
stress on the loco fleet, with only 5 nA's, which is possibly the
reason your train was hauled by a DH.

Ironically there have been a couple of opportunities over the years
for PB to obtain 2'6" gauge Garratts. There were Garratts available
when the Sierra Leone Government Railways closed, and more recently
there were two Garratts available in Nepal. They were up for sale two
years ago, but are now part of a proposed tourist railway there.

Cheers,

Michael





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Re: puffing billy

Michael J
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "crannyjohn" <peterson.john.j@...> wrote:

Hello all,

My train was hauled by DH31 but I had a chance to inspect G42 in
action. A fantastic achievement; amazing to watch. I have a question.
The Garratt was introduced to increase train sizes; Is this how it's
used on Puffing Billy?? Or are the train sizes the same as the NA's??

Cheers
John
I remember when the Garratt was being proposed for restoration (25+
years ago) there was an article in Narrow Gauge discussing how it
might affect trains. At the time one morning train had a much higher
patronage than other trains out of Belgrave, and it was suggested that
the Garratt could haul that train. It sounds as if that problem might
have been overcome with the double header already mentioned. At the
time the Lakeside extention was brand new, and I don't think Gembrook
was anything more than a fantacy.

The problem with scheduling a train to meet the Garratt's capacity is
what do you do if it is not available. The article proposed purchacing
one of the South African garratts, which has subsequently occured. Of
course it will be some years before this loco is available. In the
meantime the already extensive timetable PB runs must place some
stress on the loco fleet, with only 5 nA's, which is possibly the
reason your train was hauled by a DH.

Ironically there have been a couple of opportunities over the years
for PB to obtain 2'6" gauge Garratts. There were Garratts available
when the Sierra Leone Government Railways closed, and more recently
there were two Garratts available in Nepal. They were up for sale two
years ago, but are now part of a proposed tourist railway there.

Cheers,

Michael


Re: Early timber tramway construction methods questions

Michael J
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "mcsawdust" <mike.mccarthy@...> wrote:

Michael,

I know the tramway reasonably well. Assuming the formation you know
of is immediately east of the Bateman Rd/Dalyston Rd intersection it
would have been the log tramway serving the Woolamai Sawmilling Co
Blackwood Mill. This was situated on the west branch of Archies
Creek just south of the intersection and worked from 1899 (the
tramway was being extended towards the site from 1894)to around
1905. A log tramway followed Archies Creek north from the mill for
about 3 kms.

From memory the mill may have been erected on what was once the
Agricultural College Reserve. The timber went out west to Bass
Landing. The tramway featured at least 2 inclines on its journey to
the sea. I've found sections of it in the past mainly between the
Dalyston/Glen Forbes Rd and Mill Road. Also in a gully above the
Woolamai Race Course. The Company had another mill near the Mill
Rd/Trew Rd intersection.

I wouldn't mind getting in there and having a look sometime. Could
you tell me who now owns the property?

Cheers,

Mike McCarthy
Mike,

The mill was known to locals in the late '70's when we purchaced the
property. You are right about the agricultural college reserve - all
the properties in the area had been held on lease for a number of
years against the college being built. I never knew about the inclines.

It is about 15 years since we owned the property, and 18 months since
I visited it last. I can't remember the name of the gentleman who owns
it now but he is quite approachable, and were you to knock on his
door, I'm sure you would have no problems in inspecting the route.
Some of the larger cuttings were on the back portion of the property,
and as such were on the northern log tramway. We sold that seperately
to a neibouring farmer, and I have no idea what his attitude to you
looking over the property might be. However the fellow mentioned above
seems to know pretty well everyone, as he works really hard on
landcare activities. He would advise you how best to approach them.

Cheers,

Michael


Re: [WARNIG PHISHING] - Blue Mountains BushFire VS Wolgan Valley - Message is a scam email phishing http://www.alexandratramway.org.au/logging_equipment/harman_winch.htm

Dick Holland <rholland@...>
 

Pro,

Go to this site:

http://sentinel.ga.gov.au/acres/sentinel/index.shtml

This is satellite imagery for current bush fires. It may alleviate your concerns.

Dick Holland


Vale: Ron Preston

BLI BLI <alcogoodwin@...>
 

Hi all,
I have just recieved the terribly sad news that
Ron Preston passed away this morning.
A big loss to the hobby.
Our thoughs go out to Steve and the rest of the
Preston family.

Brad

************************************************
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************************************************
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** Still much under construction to be a more newsy site!
** Australian Industrial Railway Operations/Preservation.
** Railways of the Fiji, Philippines and South East Asia



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Blue Mountains BushFire VS Wolgan Valley

techsupport@dvt <techsupport@...>
 

Dear Researchers,

Has anyone been tracking the current 10 day Bushfire around Mt Tomah/Bell's
line of Road in the Blue Mountains NSW?

Any risk to Zig Zag, or the walking track ex Wolgan Valley/Commonwealth Oil
roadbed and shale works?

Concerned minds want to know...
(Also, if the fire does go thru, will it uncover any additional "artifacts"
or extant equipment previously un-discovered?)

Happy Modelling,
Aim to Improve,
Professor Klyzlr

"...High Lead Snigging hardwood logs,
with a Harman "Pair of 8's" winch,
somewhere deep in the Aussie Bush..."
http://www.alexandratramway.org.au/logging_equipment/harman_winch.htm

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