Date   

Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011

Stephen Percy Larcombe
 

These ones are from Plateway Press:

Narrow Gauge at War - Volume 1 by Keith Taylorson, ISBN 1871980577, 56 pages
Narrow Gauge at War 2 by Keith Taylorson, ISBN 1871980291, 116 pages

I am not sure what the other title might be

Yours

Stephen



To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
From: rthorne475@yahoo.co.uk
Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2011 11:16:33 +0000
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011






Plateway Press, in the UK, produced three excellent books on the British light railways in WWI...possibly still available. One was a reprint (with photos added) of a book privately published c1930 by one of the senior officers involved.

Richard Horne

________________________________
From: rnveditor <rodsmith@werple.net.au>
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Tuesday, 8 November 2011, 11:39
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011


Sitting on my shelf is W J K Davies 'Light railways of the first world war; a history of tactical rail communications on the British fronts, 1914-18', David & Charles, 1967.

It sits beside a larger tome, W J K Davies 'Light railways'.

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Maritime Slipways

Steamfreak <steamfreak@...>
 

Hi Rod,
That was greater devotion to the cause than I had expected, but it is
appreciated.
:-) I happened to have a spare afternoon and it was lovely weather! Well,
apart from the thunderstorm as we were pulling the boat out...

I don't think that I could launch or retrieve at Noreuil Park: the ramp
is too short, with a drop. Spirit II launches and retrieves there, but
it is metal hull, and can power up, and the semitrailer has a powerful
winch.
Yes we saw Spirit II moored there on Sunday. Would be interesting to get a
semi onto that boat ramp!

Related to the main theme: the Cumberoona slip was a specially-
constructed facility.
What was the source of the rail?
More importantly: What was the source of the bogies?
The "bogies" are better described as steel beams welded together with wheels
attached - see photos for more details. From the markings on them, I gather
they were fabricated locally as the steel had "Don Sparks Steel Supplies"
marked on it. No idea on the rail. In hindsight I should have inspected it
for castings or other marks.

The photos are in an album called "Cumberoona Slipway Albury Wodonga" in the
group photo area.

Related: Speewa punt is self slipping, on rails on one approach ramp.
I can't recall seeing that feature at Wymah, but perhaps it exists. If
so, which bank?
Yes, it has rails on the Victorian bank. I added a 2004 photo of that to
the same album, even though it is not strictly related...

Cheers,
Trevor


Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011

Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...>
 

Of course there was a substantial article in the ARHS journal just a few months ago.


Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011

Bill Bolton
 

On Tue, 8 Nov 2011 07:29:47 +1000, John wrote:

Australians played an important part in the operation of these light
railways, with several Australian Light Railway Units.
My uncle, George Henry Kohler, served as a corporal with the 15th
Light Railway Operating Company in France. As a civilian before and
after the war he was a fireman with Victorian Railways.

Cheers,

Bill


Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011

rthorne475
 

Plateway Press, in the UK, produced three excellent books on the British light railways in WWI...possibly still available.  One was a reprint (with photos added) of a book privately published c1930 by one of the senior officers involved.

Richard Horne


________________________________
From: rnveditor <rodsmith@werple.net.au>
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Tuesday, 8 November 2011, 11:39
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011


 
Sitting on my shelf is W J K Davies 'Light railways of the first world war; a history of tactical rail communications on the British fronts, 1914-18', David & Charles, 1967.

It sits beside a larger tome, W J K Davies 'Light railways'.

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: Maritime Slipways

Roderick Smith
 

Trevor,
That was greater devotion to the cause than I had expected, but it is appreciated.
I don't think that I could launch or retrieve at Noreuil Park: the ramp is too short, with a drop. Spirit II launches and retrieves there, but it is metal hull, and can power up, and the semitrailer has a powerful winch.

My current cruise (delayed by weather) was planned to be Barmah - Tocumwal & return, but is now replanned as Echuca East - Picnic Point & return, and I'll do the other half in December or January.

Related to the main theme: the Cumberoona slip was a specially-constructed facility.
What was the source of the rail?
More importantly: What was the source of the bogies?

Please place the photos online. This group uses only albums, and doesn't support attachments, so nobody is forced to view them, and one lot of work could satisfy many people in one hit, rather than many lots of work.

Related: Speewa punt is self slipping, on rails on one approach ramp. I can't recall seeing that feature at Wymah, but perhaps it exists. If so, which bank?

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

...It is an earth slipway with two steel rails. Two "bogies" hold the Cumberoona in place...Trevor.


ALL 4 in steam this Sunday

John Garaty
 

Hi all,
Tongarra Train Fest is on again...
Please note this is NOT our usual running day format

<http://www.ilrms.com.au/special_events.htm>

We should also have something else of historic interest reappearing after extensive restoration.

Come along & say hello - I should be on the Perry
Regards, John Garaty
for the ILRMS


Re: Maritime Slipways

Bill
 

Hi Trevor,

They are of general interest! Thanks for following up the query.


As an aside, last week we drove from the Redcliff boardwalk to Psyche Bend pumping station, Mildura. The narrow tracks are still there for the trolleys that ferried the timber for the boilers. It is an interesting site, with interpretive signs.

Regards,
Bill



________________________________
From: Steamfreak <steamfreak@bluedigital.com.au>
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Tuesday, 8 November 2011 12:16 PM
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Maritime Slipways

Hi Rod,
On Sunday I took a tinny cruise down the Murray from Noreuil Park then up
Wodonga Creek to the Cumberoona's slipway.  It is an earth slipway with two
steel rails.  Two "bogies" hold the Cumberoona in place, chocked by sleepers
and timber wedges.  A sturdy bow rope stops her rolling back into the creek.
A number of trees have fallen into Wodonga Creek since the Cumberoona was
staged up there, and will need some clearing to allow her to reach the
Murray again.  I'll email photos off-line - or to the list here if they are
of general interest?

Cheers,
Trevor.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Maritime Slipways

Steamfreak <steamfreak@...>
 

Hi Rod,
On Sunday I took a tinny cruise down the Murray from Noreuil Park then up
Wodonga Creek to the Cumberoona's slipway. It is an earth slipway with two
steel rails. Two "bogies" hold the Cumberoona in place, chocked by sleepers
and timber wedges. A sturdy bow rope stops her rolling back into the creek.
A number of trees have fallen into Wodonga Creek since the Cumberoona was
staged up there, and will need some clearing to allow her to reach the
Murray again. I'll email photos off-line - or to the list here if they are
of general interest?

Cheers,
Trevor.

-----Original Message-----
From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of rnveditor
Sent: Tuesday, 8 November 2011 11:53 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Maritime Slipways

I was aware from the outset that Phil was placing some rules about what
he would select, but that certainly doesn't stop me from collecting
everything which I can in one hit.
Like most research which I do, it goes to more than one group: that is
how I can justify the time spent.

Wentworth was the largest inland port in NSW; Echuca was the second-
largest port in Victoria [possibly third - surely Geelong beat it?];
Morgan was the second largest port in SA.

A lot of the Murray-Darling ones will come into Phil's consideration
under the 'history' category: they were associated with the
construction of the paddlesteamer fleets which opened up the interior.
When Australian 'lived on the sheep's' back, the wool was carried out
by river, and the supplies for the sheep-station workers came in by
river.

I have had to pause over this last week: getting RNV to the printer,
and preparing for my first voyage of the season. That has been
rearranged and delayed because of the weather today, with worse
promised tomorrow.

For a fresh installment, google on Dethridge weir. Invented in NSW,
and used at Torrumbarry (now replaced) and Mildura (still in use; and
opened over this last year. I cruised down through the opening and the
original channel while the opportunity was available).
Not light, but industrial, and a further example of the application of
rail technology for specialised purposes.
Dethridge also designed the Dethridge wheel, used extensively in
channel-irrigation systems.

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

"Iain Stuart" <iain_stuart@...> wrote:
...the Murray Darling hardly qualifies as "Maritime"...




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Re: Maritime Slipways

Roderick Smith
 

I was aware from the outset that Phil was placing some rules about what he would select, but that certainly doesn't stop me from collecting everything which I can in one hit.
Like most research which I do, it goes to more than one group: that is how I can justify the time spent.

Wentworth was the largest inland port in NSW; Echuca was the second-largest port in Victoria [possibly third - surely Geelong beat it?]; Morgan was the second largest port in SA.

A lot of the Murray-Darling ones will come into Phil's consideration under the 'history' category: they were associated with the construction of the paddlesteamer fleets which opened up the interior. When Australian 'lived on the sheep's' back, the wool was carried out by river, and the supplies for the sheep-station workers came in by river.

I have had to pause over this last week: getting RNV to the printer, and preparing for my first voyage of the season. That has been rearranged and delayed because of the weather today, with worse promised tomorrow.

For a fresh installment, google on Dethridge weir. Invented in NSW, and used at Torrumbarry (now replaced) and Mildura (still in use; and opened over this last year. I cruised down through the opening and the original channel while the opportunity was available).
Not light, but industrial, and a further example of the application of rail technology for specialised purposes.
Dethridge also designed the Dethridge wheel, used extensively in channel-irrigation systems.

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

"Iain Stuart" <iain_stuart@...> wrote:
...the Murray Darling hardly qualifies as "Maritime"...


Re: FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011

Roderick Smith
 

Sitting on my shelf is W J K Davies 'Light railways of the first world war; a history of tactical rail communications on the British fronts, 1914-18', David & Charles, 1967.

It sits beside a larger tome, W J K Davies 'Light railways'.

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Maritime Slipways

Iain
 

Apart from thinking that the Murray Darling hardly qualifies as "Maritime" -
the more important question is how is all this information going to be
collected stored and presented? I was wondering whether a simple data base
could be used that gives basic details and links to Google Earth so you can
find the locations of the slips? Does this sound like a goer?



yours



Dr Iain Stuart



JCIS Consultants

P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North

NSW 2137

Australia



(02) 97010191

Iain_Stuart@optusnet.com.au


Re: Maritime Slipways

BM
 

Phil,
Yes your request to the LRRSA Yahoo Group has produced lots of fascinating
responses. There is an item in the Research section of the December issue of
Light Railways requesting information from readers that may help to draw
additional information on this subject.

Bob McKillop
LR Heritage & research Editor

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf
Of Phil
Sent: Monday, 7 November 2011 10:12 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Maritime Slipways

 

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to this discussion, especially
Rod, Denis and Iain.

Good to get so many leads on Riverine slips - we might have to call it
"Maritime and Riverine Slipways" (thanks to Bill Russell for introducing
this theme.)

David asked "Are the researchers collecting material on all slips still in
existence or restricting the research to a size and length? - David Axup"

We do need to restrict it somewhat otherwise we'd end up with literally
hundreds - though they are disappearing, with the larger establishments
installing rubber-tyred gantries [that somehow, in my view, fail to "cut the
mustard"!].

So, any slipway railway that had any of these features (Lengthy, Historic,
Complex, Multiplicity, Quirkiness) are the sort of features in which we are
particularly interested.

cheers Jim Longworth and Phil Rickard


FW: Armistice Day Friday 11th November 2011

John Browning
 

Thanks for Terry Olsson of ANGRMS for this Remembrance Day contribution.


Light railways played an important part in WW1 in France. In the environment
of the Western Front, main line railways could get no closer than five to
eight kilometres from the trenches, as they were a prime target for
artillery and were very expensive to install and maintain. Narrow gauge
'light railways' served as the vital connection between the main line
railheads and the forward areas. By 1917, an average of 165,530 tons of war
material was being moved per week on the light railways. A peak of 210,808
tons was reached in October 1917 in connection with the Battle of Ypres. By
the Armistice in Nov 1917, these light railways totalled about 6000km of
track in the British sector alone, to which about 750 steam locomotives and
a similar number of small internal-combustion locomotives had been
delivered.

Australians played an important part in the operation of these light
railways, with several Australian Light Railway Units.

Here is a copy of a letter sent home from one of the Australians who helped
run the light railways in WW1.



The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866-1939), Saturday 30 June 1917, page
41



LIGHT RAILWAYS IN FRANCE.

THE ANZACS.



S. H. Hancox, formerly in charge ofthe electric power house at the railway
workshops, North Ipswich, writes from France to a friend in Brisbane:

I owe you many letters, but must plead the urgency of public affairs.
Building and running light railways at the Front is a most time-absorbing
occupation, especially when there is a thaw after a big freeze, and the
whole country mud. Some of our lines were built during the winter, and, of
course, are all more or less over shell holes, and as we had no ballast, and
could not possibly get any, there was a good deal of ice under the line.
That did not matter till the thaw came. Just then they piled in tons of
ammunition for us to carry. I nearly went white headed over it. However, we
struggled through. Many are the woes of railway building and working at the
Front. To start with, we have to build the lines over shell holes, many
10ft. and 12ft. deep.



Then we have great trouble with the rails. We got over that to a great
extent by gathering up old German rails, many of which had been blown up,
bent and broken. We straightened them out, and pulled old dug-outs, &c, to
pieces to get rails. Then we could not get sleepers for a long time. We
split trees, but they were so filled with shrapnel that that did not pay. We
cut any timber we could get; then we could not get dog spikes, but managed
to eke them out. We never could get enough ballast. We got a little, and
have used bricks and chalk chiefly, but it is slow work digging them out,
and. of course, the railways are wanted in a hurry.



We managed to get some locomotives which no one else wanted, as they were
too hard to keep on the line. We got some tractors and trucks, but it is a
terrible job to get any parts. We got a forge in an old shop and fixed it up
to be driven from our motor tractors, and cast our brasses for bearings. We
are now using old brass shell cases, and pick up scraps of iron in different
villages for the blacksmith, and old machinery for tools. We even rose to
making springs for our tractors, using whale oil to temper them in.



I forgot to say we had to lay our rails without any fishplates. I had the
selection of the men to work the lines. I went through all the battalions,
and we got a pretty good crew of traffic and locomotive employees and
fettlers together. Of course, in addition to the ordinary troubles of
railways, we have German shells to contend with. We have been very lucky so
far as we have not had any rolling stock hit. Altogetherwe have quite a
decent show of mileage of track and rolling stock, and what we have managed
to do surprised everyone.



The corps staff says it has been a huge success, and has exceeded their most
optimistic expectations. The chief engineer of the army says the Anzacs are
the only people who take these light railways seriously, and construct and
run them as railways. One thing we did was considered so important that the
people concerned immediately wired to General Headquarters to tell them. It
is important, too, and I can see great possibilities from it. Now under the
present exciting circumstances of course every one is worrying us, and we
are in a great rush to build more lines. Herb would enjoy these railways.
Our initials are A (Anzac) L (Light) R (Railways). I heard someone say they
stood for 'Always Leaving Rails'. It will be all right when we get dry
ground though.



While the big freeze was on we ran heavy loads at a great rate . . . . In
fact, I'm rather proud of the way in which the Anzacs have held their front
right through the winter, under, I suppose, the worst conditions in the
front . . .


Here is a very interesting "YouTube" link to some great old WW1 war footage
showing these "Light Railways":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3s01i3aa7w





John


Re: Maritime Slipways

Phil <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to this discussion, especially Rod, Denis and Iain.

Good to get so many leads on Riverine slips - we might have to call it "Maritime and Riverine Slipways" (thanks to Bill Russell for introducing this theme.)

David asked "Are the researchers collecting material on all slips still in existence or restricting the research to a size and length? - David Axup"
We do need to restrict it somewhat otherwise we'd end up with literally hundreds - though they are disappearing, with the larger establishments installing rubber-tyred gantries [that somehow, in my view, fail to "cut the mustard"!].

So, any slipway railway that had any of these features (Lengthy, Historic, Complex, Multiplicity, Quirkiness) are the sort of features in which we are particularly interested.

cheers Jim Longworth and Phil Rickard


Parramatta weir

Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...>
 

In the concrete pathway area on the southern side of Parramatta weir
(NSW) (west of the ferry wharf), there are about 6 metres of a pair of
deteriorating rails with flangeways, looking like a railway/tramway
track of about 15-inch gauge. Are these a gimmick, a genuine
railway-type relic, or something else?


Re: Maritime Slipways

Roderick Smith
 

Paul's NZ photos are in an album NZ Bush Things in the group's photos section. Direct entry
<http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/photos/album/1359627300/pic/list>

I have been adding more slipway photos to the Slipway album.
<http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/photos/album/1564415780/pic/list
t>
This is an open album: anyone can post to it.

I am reminded of <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brighton_and_Rottingdean_Seashore_Electric_Railway>, which is also the method used at various Disneylands for supposed 'boats'.

Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

I've posted two pictures of a similar fish transport tramway on the Cascade River in Westland NZ...Paul


Re: Maritime Slipways

tankienz <bandm@...>
 

I've posted two pictures of a similar fish transport tramway on the Cascade River in Westland NZ. A hand pushed wagon picked up the whitebait from the wharf. The track went through the first building which was probably a packing shed then the track went into the cluster of buildings, probably to carry general stores. I believe the track cut back at a set of points towards the cooler and ultimately right onto the bush airfield to the left where small single engined aircraft uplifted the tins of whitebait.

Paul

I like it Paul ! It's a fishy-business; we already know of a tram near Sydney used in Oyster-farming on the Georges River, from shed into the water, to carry the trays. A type of slipway, sans-boat!

cheers Phil


Re: 2ft Gauge Baldwin Bo Bo diesel

Brian <rallim56@...>
 

Mackay Sugar has a number of 0-6-0 Comeng 2ft. gauge locos for sale if you are interested in therm.
Brian
Qld. Aust.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Craven" <brian.craven@clara.net>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au>
Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2011 7:49 AM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 2ft Gauge Baldwin Bo Bo diesel


Cheers Brian
The SA Class 91's either were sold privately (4) or got re-gauged to 3ft
6in Cape Gauge.
No luck there either!!
We'll have to build our own!
B ;~)

On 11/1/2011 9:07 PM, Brian wrote:

Sorry, some of my previous email disappeared it should have read as
follows:-

I would doubt you will be able to buy any Bo Bo cane locos [diesel
hydraulics] from any of the sugar mills here in Oz, but a couple of years
ago, Spoornet South Africa had some 2ft. gauge UM6B's for sale, I think a
lot of them went to
here>> <http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=330755&skip=1
<http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=330755&skip=1>>

Brian
Qld. Aust.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian" <rallim56@bigpond.com <mailto:rallim56%40bigpond.com>>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>>
Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2011 6:59 AM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] 2ft Gauge Baldwin Bo Bo diesel

I would doubt you will be able to buy any Bo Bo cane locos [diesel
hydraulics] from any of the sugar mills here in Oz, but a couple of
years
ago, I think a lot of them went to
here>> <http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=330755&skip=1
<http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=330755&skip=1>>
Brian
Qld. Aust.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Craven" <brian.craven@clara.net
<mailto:brian.craven%40clara.net>>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>>
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 6:47 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] 2ft Gauge Baldwin Bo Bo diesel


Hello there down under!

I'm a trustee, p/way and operating driver on the 2ft gauge South
Tynedale Railway - see www.strps.org.uk.

We're currently restoring the historic ex Harrogate Gas Works Railway,
Green's of Leeds no 441 of 1908, 0-6-2ST BARBER.

We are very keen to hear about the Green's 0-4-2 in Oz - can anyone
help?

Also, a group of us would like to acquire a Bo-Bo diesel - preferably
diesel electric.

We run on a ex-BR standard gauge formation and use 50lb - 75lb rail, so
weights and clearances are not a problem.

Our maximum axle load at present is 7.5t, but we can carry more.

Any ideas about what if anything may be available?

Brian Craven
STRPS
Here in the "Up over"!!

On 10/18/2011 12:37 AM, Brian wrote:

I have noticed with the 18t. Clyde's which originally had leave
suspension
and the 24t. Clyde's which originally had coil suspension these locos
were
modified in the 60's to rubber blocks which over the years have gone
hard
and now we get a lot of wheelslip because the suspension can no longer
equalize properly, especially with 2ft. gauge loco's with the axle
boxes on
the outside of the wheels, this creates a counter balance situation
when the
wheels go over a rise in one rail the oposite wheel is carried because
the
suspension doesn't have enough componsation.
Brian
Qld. Aust.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@railsignallingservices.com.au
<mailto:bhanks%40railsignallingservices.com.au>
<mailto:bhanks%40railsignallingservices.com.au>>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>>
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 8:41 AM
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info

G'day Bruce,

Thank you for this comparative information.

Having operated all three of the West Melbourne Gasworks locos
over a
number of years, it has been interesting to note that whilst they
are all
a similar arrangement and weight, the Peckett seems to 'dig in' the
best.
I can only put that down to the fact is some 30 years or so newer
than the
two Decauville/Couillet locos and a more refined design. 'John Benn'
861,
modified to be a 2-4-2, is heavier but with un-equalized
springing and
seems to 'dig in' the least.

Regards,

Bill.

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>]
On Behalf
Of Bruce Rankin
Sent: Friday, 14 October 2011 7:00 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge
Baldwin Loco
Info



Hi Bill,

Hard to say how much the loco weighed, but my guess is somewhere
between 5
to 8 tons. I suppose the reason that I only quote that weight is
that the
American locos had lighter boilers and wooden cab, whereas the
corresponding
British locos had heavier boiler and steel cabs 9and probably
heavier
cylinders than the cheaper Yankee jobs.).

The Baldwin was a much 'chunkier' loco than the Puffing Billy
Peckett. The
Baldwin had cylinders 8" x 12", whereas the Peckett only has 7" x
10"; in
the driving wheel department, the Baldwin has 26" against the
Peckett's
20";the boiler pressure on the Baldwin was 160psi against 140psi
(guessed)
on the Peckett; resulting in a tractive effort from the Baldwin of
4010lbs
(from the spec sheet) against a calculated 2915lb for the Peckett.
It's
amazing what effort a small loco will make. All interesting
stuff and
a
lot
of fun playing with the 'numbers'.

Cheers,

Bruce

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>]
On

Behalf
Of Bill Hanks
Sent: Thursday, 13 October 2011 08:33
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge
Baldwin Loco
Info

Bruce,
I imagine it weighed somewhere between 8 to 10 tons. My standard for
estimating the haulage capacity of various small locos, is to
compare them
with the 0-4-0 Peckett No.1711 at Puffing Billy. It weighs 7 tons
and has
been known to haul two loaded NQR ballast wagons (about 10 to 12
tons each
loaded) up a 1 in 40 grade. I guess the Kiama Baldwin would have
been able
to handle a slightly heavier load.
Regards,
Bill.

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ] On
Behalf Of Bruce Rankin
Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 5:24 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge
Baldwin Loco
Info

Bill,

Unfortunately, the spec does not list a weight for the loco.

Bruce

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>]
On
Behalf
Of Bill Hanks
Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 10:26
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge
Baldwin Loco
Info

Can somebody tell us what this locomotive weighed?
Regards,
Bill Hanks

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ]
On
Behalf Of neville conder
Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 10:15 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge
Baldwin Loco
Info

Hi Bruce and others

Thanks for all the information. I saw a photo recently with people
standing
in front of the Baldwin 21 in front of the Post Office you don't
realize
how
small they were. Must have been a struggle when they were going up
Manning
Street to the government railway yard.
What were the colours of the locomotives over the years. I have a
photo of
the Davenport at Goulburn in red oxide with a white roof. This could
have
been painted at a later date.
On Saturday someone at the local historical society is giving a
talk
on
the
tramway. I'm going along to listen but don't expect to find out
anything
new. but you never know.
Regards
Neville











------------------------------------

Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways
and
the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the
members of
the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their
authors and
opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any
LRRSA
member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"
Yahoo!7 Groups Links





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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.1831 / Virus Database: 2090/4556 - Release Date:
10/16/11

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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 1522/3957 - Release Date:
10/17/11





------------------------------------

Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light
Railways and
the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the
members of
the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and
opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA
member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"
Yahoo!7 Groups Links





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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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10/31/11


------------------------------------

Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways
and
the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the
members of
the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and
opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA
member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"
Yahoo!7 Groups Links





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10/31/11

------------------------------------------------------------------------

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------------------------------------

Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"
Yahoo!7 Groups Links





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Re: 2ft Gauge Baldwin Bo Bo diesel

rthorne475
 

KATE, the 0-4-0WT at Margaret River is 3' 6" gauge, whereas the 0-4-2ST in Queensland is 2' 0" gauge,  I'm pretty sure that KATE is T Green 132, but I'm currently travelling in Oz and my records are at home in the UK.

Richard Horne


________________________________
From: moretonshay <alcogoodwin@yahoo.com.au>
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Wednesday, 2 November 2011, 7:51
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: 2ft Gauge Baldwin Bo Bo diesel


 
Howdee,
This is probably best left up to the experts :-)

However a quick look through 'A Guide To Australasian Locomotion' ( a great book on current locomotives in Australia, NZ and Fiji :-) ) shows a Thomas Green (I presume thats the same) 0-4-0WT on static display sat Margaret River in WA.
Is this the same loco, or is there another?

Thomas Green 132 of 1889.

Brad

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, Brian Craven <brian.craven@...> wrote:

Hello there down under!

I'm a trustee, p/way and operating driver on the 2ft gauge South
Tynedale Railway - see www.strps.org.uk.

We're currently restoring the historic ex Harrogate Gas Works Railway,
Green's of Leeds no 441 of 1908, 0-6-2ST BARBER.

We are very keen to hear about the Green's 0-4-2 in Oz - can anyone help?

Also, a group of us would like to acquire a Bo-Bo diesel - preferably
diesel electric.

We run on a ex-BR standard gauge formation and use 50lb - 75lb rail, so
weights and clearances are not a problem.

Our maximum axle load at present is 7.5t, but we can carry more.

Any ideas about what if anything may be available?

Brian Craven
STRPS
Here in the "Up over"!!

On 10/18/2011 12:37 AM, Brian wrote:

I have noticed with the 18t. Clyde's which originally had leave
suspension
and the 24t. Clyde's which originally had coil suspension these locos
were
modified in the 60's to rubber blocks which over the years have gone hard
and now we get a lot of wheelslip because the suspension can no longer
equalize properly, especially with 2ft. gauge loco's with the axle
boxes on
the outside of the wheels, this creates a counter balance situation
when the
wheels go over a rise in one rail the oposite wheel is carried because
the
suspension doesn't have enough componsation.
Brian
Qld. Aust.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@...
<mailto:bhanks%40railsignallingservices.com.au>>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>>
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 8:41 AM
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info

G'day Bruce,

Thank you for this comparative information.

Having operated all three of the West Melbourne Gasworks locos over a
number of years, it has been interesting to note that whilst they
are all
a similar arrangement and weight, the Peckett seems to 'dig in' the
best.
I can only put that down to the fact is some 30 years or so newer
than the
two Decauville/Couillet locos and a more refined design. 'John Benn'
861,
modified to be a 2-4-2, is heavier but with un-equalized springing and
seems to 'dig in' the least.

Regards,

Bill.

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>]
On Behalf
Of Bruce Rankin
Sent: Friday, 14 October 2011 7:00 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info



Hi Bill,

Hard to say how much the loco weighed, but my guess is somewhere
between 5
to 8 tons. I suppose the reason that I only quote that weight is
that the
American locos had lighter boilers and wooden cab, whereas the
corresponding
British locos had heavier boiler and steel cabs 9and probably heavier
cylinders than the cheaper Yankee jobs.).

The Baldwin was a much 'chunkier' loco than the Puffing Billy
Peckett. The
Baldwin had cylinders 8" x 12", whereas the Peckett only has 7" x
10"; in
the driving wheel department, the Baldwin has 26" against the Peckett's
20";the boiler pressure on the Baldwin was 160psi against 140psi
(guessed)
on the Peckett; resulting in a tractive effort from the Baldwin of
4010lbs
(from the spec sheet) against a calculated 2915lb for the Peckett. It's
amazing what effort a small loco will make. All interesting stuff and a
lot
of fun playing with the 'numbers'.

Cheers,

Bruce

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>] On

Behalf
Of Bill Hanks
Sent: Thursday, 13 October 2011 08:33
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info

Bruce,
I imagine it weighed somewhere between 8 to 10 tons. My standard for
estimating the haulage capacity of various small locos, is to
compare them
with the 0-4-0 Peckett No.1711 at Puffing Billy. It weighs 7 tons
and has
been known to haul two loaded NQR ballast wagons (about 10 to 12
tons each
loaded) up a 1 in 40 grade. I guess the Kiama Baldwin would have
been able
to handle a slightly heavier load.
Regards,
Bill.

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ] On
Behalf Of Bruce Rankin
Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 5:24 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info

Bill,

Unfortunately, the spec does not list a weight for the loco.

Bruce

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>]
On
Behalf
Of Bill Hanks
Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 10:26
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info

Can somebody tell us what this locomotive weighed?
Regards,
Bill Hanks

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
[mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ]
On
Behalf Of neville conder
Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 10:15 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au><mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Re: Kiama Tramway Again - 2ft. Gauge Baldwin Loco
Info

Hi Bruce and others

Thanks for all the information. I saw a photo recently with people
standing
in front of the Baldwin 21 in front of the Post Office you don't
realize
how
small they were. Must have been a struggle when they were going up
Manning
Street to the government railway yard.
What were the colours of the locomotives over the years. I have a
photo of
the Davenport at Goulburn in red oxide with a white roof. This could
have
been painted at a later date.
On Saturday someone at the local historical society is giving a talk on
the
tramway. I'm going along to listen but don't expect to find out anything
new. but you never know.
Regards
Neville

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











------------------------------------

Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways
and
the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the
members of
the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and
opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA
member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"
Yahoo!7 Groups Links





-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.1831 / Virus Database: 2090/4556 - Release Date:
10/16/11

----------------------------------------------------------

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 1522/3957 - Release Date: 10/17/11


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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