Date   

Re: Cheetham Saltworks Point Henry Geelong

John Browning
 

Can someone provide some clarity on the sites of the various Cheetham
operations?

My list now extends to Laverton, Geelong, Moolap and Point Henry. Am I
correct in assuming that the last three are all one and the same?



The second of John's photos shows a 2ft gauge Days locomotive.

I understand that Cheetham had at least four of these.

Two went to Van Diemen LRS in Tasmania, of which I believe one went to
Redwater Creek.

One was at Geelong Steam Preservation Society at Belmont Common (now
Bellarine Peninsula Railway)

One was at Puffing Billy Menzies Creek

Can anyone report on their current whereabouts and state?



John



John Browning
Rockhampton
Queensland
Australia



PO Box 5646
Central Queensland Mail Centre 4702



Phone +61 (0) 7 4926 6356
Mobile 0407 069 199


Re: SW Victoria, Heywood/Portland Tramways.

Colin Harvey
 

The two I know of were Jas McGregor & Sons/Righetti & Reid at Heywood c1885-c1890. 2ft gauge (VPRS 440/P0, Unit 1251, File 96/145),
and Benbow & Sons/H & L Rosenbloom c1888-1896 in the parish of Gorae (VPRS 5357/P0, Unit 1418, File 804/99).

These are the mysterious unidentified tramways shown on the map on page 9 of Light Railways 144 running west from the Portland-Heywood road.

Regards

Colin

----- Original Message -----
From: Frank Stamford
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 1:53 PM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] SW Victoria, Heywood/Portland Tramways.



Were there any timber tramways in this area ?

Certainly not to my knowledge.

Regards,

Frank

At 07:04 PM 15/11/2006, you wrote:

>I'm looking for any information on timber tramways in the
>Heywood/Portland area of south west Victoria. So far I have found
>only two references for approved applications for tramways near
>Heywood, one in 1885, the other 1886.


Cheetham Saltworks Point Henry Geelong

JH
 

Hi
Have posted some more of my historical photos. These from the Cheetham
Saltworks at Point Henry probably c.1930s. Remnants of this rail system
still exist on site. I'm not all that sure the two blokes behind the
wagon of salt would agree with the term 'light rail' though.
John


Re: Aerial Ropeways (cont.)

bll_hnks
 

Phil,



You can add the one at Jumbunna North that operated sometime around
1900.



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Phil Rickard
Sent: Thursday, 16 November 2006 3:40 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Aerial Ropeways (cont.)



Further to the list of NSW ropeways that was posted a couple of weeks
ago, I think Mt Dromedary Gold Mine can be added. I gather it was to
the west of Central Tilba, in fairly rugged country.

If you search for Mt Dromedary in PictureAustralia there are some
extremely good-quality pics available. (presuming they are correctly
captioned!)

I can't find many proper ropeways in Victoria - can anyone add to:

Wensley Bray open-cut brown coal mine to siding near Wensleydale
station (about 7kms).
Batesford limestone quarry to Fyansford cement works (1912 - 1925,
replaced by private railway).
and the two uses by the MMBW: Healesville station to Maroondah dam,
and Mt Evelyn station to Silvan dam.

For South Australia, in addition to that at Lake Macdonnell previously
mentioned by Peter Knife, add:
Brighton Cement works - Reynella quarry - 4 miles, 1920's
BHAS - Wardang Island. Lime sands to jetty.
BHAS - Point Turton. Lime sands to jetty. ?
(was this the Wardang Island plant at a new location?)
Point McLeay Mission Station - from wool store to jetty.
(see SLSA image PRG 280/1/4/24)
Noarlunga Sand Company Ltd - Maslin's Beach 2km ?
(see SLSA image B 56995)

Would readers care to comment/add/correct, to above?
(one can't always relay on photo captions on the various libraries!
The use of the terms, ropeway, rope way, flying fox, aerial tramway,
is entirely subject to the whim/knowledge of the captioner.)

When we have enough I'll compile them all into a List and post it in
the Files section so it's all in one place.

cheers Phil


Aerial Ropeways (cont.)

Phil Rickard <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

Further to the list of NSW ropeways that was posted a couple of weeks
ago, I think Mt Dromedary Gold Mine can be added. I gather it was to
the west of Central Tilba, in fairly rugged country.

If you search for Mt Dromedary in PictureAustralia there are some
extremely good-quality pics available. (presuming they are correctly
captioned!)

I can't find many proper ropeways in Victoria - can anyone add to:

Wensley Bray open-cut brown coal mine to siding near Wensleydale
station (about 7kms).
Batesford limestone quarry to Fyansford cement works (1912 – 1925,
replaced by private railway).
and the two uses by the MMBW: Healesville station to Maroondah dam,
and Mt Evelyn station to Silvan dam.

For South Australia, in addition to that at Lake Macdonnell previously
mentioned by Peter Knife, add:
Brighton Cement works - Reynella quarry - 4 miles, 1920's
BHAS - Wardang Island. Lime sands to jetty.
BHAS - Point Turton. Lime sands to jetty. ?
(was this the Wardang Island plant at a new location?)
Point McLeay Mission Station - from wool store to jetty.
(see SLSA image PRG 280/1/4/24)
Noarlunga Sand Company Ltd - Maslin's Beach 2km ?
(see SLSA image B 56995)

Would readers care to comment/add/correct, to above?
(one can't always relay on photo captions on the various libraries!
The use of the terms, ropeway, rope way, flying fox, aerial tramway,
is entirely subject to the whim/knowledge of the captioner.)

When we have enough I'll compile them all into a List and post it in
the Files section so it's all in one place.

cheers Phil


Re: SW Victoria, Heywood/Portland Tramways.

g522y169 <jloughnan@...>
 

I still have a lot of things to check on this one but according to a
local there were two horse drawn tramways just north of Heathmere, one
was supposed to be five miles long, the applications for permits were
in the Portland Guardian. I can see that I have a lot of reading of
the old papers to do.


--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@...>
wrote:


Were there any timber tramways in this area ?

Certainly not to my knowledge.

Regards,

Frank


At 07:04 PM 15/11/2006, you wrote:

I'm looking for any information on timber tramways in the
Heywood/Portland area of south west Victoria. So far I have found
only two references for approved applications for tramways near
Heywood, one in 1885, the other 1886.


Re: SW Victoria, Heywood/Portland Tramways.

Frank Stamford
 

Were there any timber tramways in this area ?

Certainly not to my knowledge.

Regards,

Frank

At 07:04 PM 15/11/2006, you wrote:

I'm looking for any information on timber tramways in the
Heywood/Portland area of south west Victoria. So far I have found
only two references for approved applications for tramways near
Heywood, one in 1885, the other 1886.


Re: Early timber tramway construction methods questions

Frank Stamford
 

John,

These are my thoughts on your questions:

Presumably the gauge would have been 30 or 36 inch – to carry
such a gauge, how wide would the roadbed have to be?

I would not presume such narrow gauges for a pre-1890 tramway. A gauge
somewhere between 3 ft 6 in and about 5 ft is more likely. If we are
talking about an 1850s tramway, then most of those seem to have been more
than 4 ft and probably around 5 ft. Roughly laid narrow-gauge tramways
don't suit the carriage of large diameter logs from virgin forests, and in
any case most people laying tramways in the 1850s did not have much
experience of narrow track gauges. The roadbed would have been as narrow as
they could possibly make it.


•With a bridge across the river being necessary, would this be
likely to be the same width as the roadbed or wider – if so how much?

At the top it would be as narrow as they judged they could safely make it
without losing the horses over the side. It would be wider at the bottom as
there would be some degree of angle on the piles, but it again it would be
simple and cheap as they judged tolerably safe.

Presumably horse-drawn and carrying rail sleepers for
shipping off for construction of the Victorian rail network, I
presume that sleepers to support the rails would have to be laid in
such a manner and the spaces between filled with earth to provide a
suitable track for the horses – How far apart would these have been
likely to have been laid and would this distance be different if
steam engines had been used as motive power?
There was more than one way of laying horse-hauled timber tramways, and the
method of construction partly depended on the ground conditions, and the
experience of the builder. The simplest method was to lay sleepers very
close together (like a corduroy road) then nail the rails on top. But if
the ground was wet and or rough they would lay logs across the roadbed at
intervals of anything up to 12 ft, then lay longitudinal bearers of about
12 inch diameter on top of the logs, then either (a) lay wooden rails on
top of the bearers and fill the space in the middle with earth; or (b) lay
closely packed sleepers on top of the bearers and lay the rails on top of
the sleepers. These methods of construction used a lot of timber, but that
was readily available. It would be different if steam locos were used as
motive power, they would not need to provide a smooth path for the horses,
so they would use only enough sleepers to maintain the integrity of the
track. But it is extremely unlikely they would be using steam on a tramway
prior to the 1890s.

•How would the wooden rails have been fastened to the
sleepers? Bolts? Nails? Dog spikes?

Nails or wooden wedges. They would not use dogspikes or bolts.

•Crossing a flood prone floodplain, is it probable those who
built the tramway would have constructed an earthen embankment to
raise the line above flood levels? Or are they more likely to have
constructed the line on the other side of the river on higher ground
(where Norm Houghton puts it)?
Highly unlikely that they would construct an earthen embankment (unless
they had dug out a lot of soil from a cutting and needed somewhere to put
it). They would either build the line on the other side of the river on
higher ground, or build a long low simple wooden trestle bridge across the
floodplain.

Best of luck with your investigations. Unfortunately the evidence is likely
to be very subtle I think.

Frank

At 09:29 PM 15/11/2006, you wrote:

As part of a broader archaeological/cultural heritage assessment of
an area at Apollo Bay in Victoria, I am investigating a possible
timber tramway alignment. The only evidence we have at this stage is
an old, undated map (thought to be c.1890s) that has "old tramway"
marked on it, although there is also the possibility there may be
some evidence still visible on the ground. Norm Houghton has
identified three timber tramways in the general area, none of which
he places within this immediate area. Of these three, two were still
operational around the time the map is supposed to have been drawn,
so we can probably eliminate them (there is other historical evidence
to eliminate them from the equation as well). This leaves the
possibility that there was a fourth timber tramline, that the early
(1853-c.1864) tramline was located along a different alignment than
shown by earlier research or that an error has been made in the
mapping.
To assist me in determining if a tramway did exist along this
alignment I am wondering if anyone can help with the following
questions regarding early timber tramway construction. Please forgive
me if I use the wrong terminology in posing these questions (and
please point out the correct terminology).
•Presumably the gauge would have been 30 or 36 inch – to carry
such a gauge, how wide would the roadbed have to be?
•With a bridge across the river being necessary, would this be
likely to be the same width as the roadbed or wider – if so how much?
•Presumably horse-drawn and carrying rail sleepers for
shipping off for construction of the Victorian rail network, I
presume that sleepers to support the rails would have to be laid in
such a manner and the spaces between filled with earth to provide a
suitable track for the horses – How far apart would these have been
likely to have been laid and would this distance be different if
steam engines had been used as motive power?
•How would the wooden rails have been fastened to the
sleepers? Bolts? Nails? Dog spikes?
•Crossing a flood prone floodplain, is it probable those who
built the tramway would have constructed an earthen embankment to
raise the line above flood levels? Or are they more likely to have
constructed the line on the other side of the river on higher ground
(where Norm Houghton puts it)?
I am planning to conduct field investigations during the last week of
November so any early replies would be appreciated. And if any one
can think of any other physical signs that I should be looking for,
please feel free to add to my list. The area has been cultivated on
and off during the last 140 years.
Thanks in advance
John Hyett


Re: Early timber tramway construction methods questions

Michael J
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "John Hyett" <john.hyett@...> wrote:

As part of a broader archaeological/cultural heritage assessment of
an area at Apollo Bay in Victoria, I am investigating a possible
timber tramway alignment.
John,

Others will have far more technical experience than me. I can only
talk about a timber tramway that was located on a farm we used to own
in the Bass Hills, behind Glen Forbes in West Gippsland.

Like your example it was marked on an 1890 map as an "old tramway",
and was found on land that had been consistantly grazed over the last
100 years. There was no physical evidence of the tramway, besides the
cuttings and sections of roadbed workings. However once you knew what
you were looking for it was still quite easy to follow the route of
the tramway. It followed the course of the creek closely, and would
have had some quite tight curves. The cuttings, some of which were up
to 6' high, were about 6' wide. Thinking about it the use of the land
probably helped preserve the cuttings - the land was too rugged for
the farmer to get in there and plow everything up for crops, and
grazing stopped forest regrowth.

So good luck with your search, it is quite possible cuttings are still
there.

Michael


Early timber tramway construction methods questions

JH
 

As part of a broader archaeological/cultural heritage assessment of
an area at Apollo Bay in Victoria, I am investigating a possible
timber tramway alignment. The only evidence we have at this stage is
an old, undated map (thought to be c.1890s) that has "old tramway"
marked on it, although there is also the possibility there may be
some evidence still visible on the ground. Norm Houghton has
identified three timber tramways in the general area, none of which
he places within this immediate area. Of these three, two were still
operational around the time the map is supposed to have been drawn,
so we can probably eliminate them (there is other historical evidence
to eliminate them from the equation as well). This leaves the
possibility that there was a fourth timber tramline, that the early
(1853-c.1864) tramline was located along a different alignment than
shown by earlier research or that an error has been made in the
mapping.
To assist me in determining if a tramway did exist along this
alignment I am wondering if anyone can help with the following
questions regarding early timber tramway construction. Please forgive
me if I use the wrong terminology in posing these questions (and
please point out the correct terminology).
• Presumably the gauge would have been 30 or 36 inch – to carry
such a gauge, how wide would the roadbed have to be?
• With a bridge across the river being necessary, would this be
likely to be the same width as the roadbed or wider – if so how much?
• Presumably horse-drawn and carrying rail sleepers for
shipping off for construction of the Victorian rail network, I
presume that sleepers to support the rails would have to be laid in
such a manner and the spaces between filled with earth to provide a
suitable track for the horses – How far apart would these have been
likely to have been laid and would this distance be different if
steam engines had been used as motive power?
• How would the wooden rails have been fastened to the
sleepers? Bolts? Nails? Dog spikes?
• Crossing a flood prone floodplain, is it probable those who
built the tramway would have constructed an earthen embankment to
raise the line above flood levels? Or are they more likely to have
constructed the line on the other side of the river on higher ground
(where Norm Houghton puts it)?
I am planning to conduct field investigations during the last week of
November so any early replies would be appreciated. And if any one
can think of any other physical signs that I should be looking for,
please feel free to add to my list. The area has been cultivated on
and off during the last 140 years.
Thanks in advance
John Hyett


SW Victoria, Heywood/Portland Tramways.

g522y169 <jloughnan@...>
 

I'm looking for any information on timber tramways in the
Heywood/Portland area of south west Victoria. So far I have found
only two references for approved applications for tramways near
Heywood, one in 1885, the other 1886.


Fowler Jackshaft loco

Chas Bevan <bevac@...>
 

In 1963 the General Manager of the Miller Machinery Co in South Melbourne showed me a narrow gauge cane loco that had been stored there for some years. In the gloom I missed that it was a jack shaft drive. I was advised later that it had been sold to Queensland and understood it was the loco now in the Sugar museum there.
Chas Bevan


Re: Coffee Pot (Newcastle) info

John Shoebridge
 

Hi Group
I have been off line for a day or so and maybe someone has answered the question re the history of loco "Coffee Pot" but here goes again...

Built in 1887 by Hudson Bros at Redfern as the power unit of a combination tramcar. Seated 60 passengers and weighes 8 tons. It worked for Saywell's Estate and Tramway Coy between Rockdale and Brighton le Sands until the line was electrified in 1899. The engine unit was then sold via Goninan to the Toronto Hotel and Tramway Coy for the line between Fassifern and Toronto. The fate of the passenger section is not recorded. At that time its unusual high pressure multi tubular boiler was replaced with a conventional single flue vertical and the engine converted from a quadruple expansion to twin cylinder simple.

When the Toronto Tramway was taken over by the Government around 1910 , "Coffee Pot" went back to Goninan and was soon sold to Thomas Howley to work the railway between Glenrock Colliery and The Junction. Laid aside around 1920 outside Howley's engine shed (where I can clearly remember it) the remains were cut up sometime around 1949.

I am researching the Glenrock line and would be most interested if anyone has anything else to add to the above.

Re: Sydney Soap and Candle Coy.. Tighes Hill, Newcastle ... this works had a short branch off the Waratah Coal Coy (later Caledonian Collieries Ltd) line near Scholey Street. For many years (perhaps even to this day) the remains of this siding could be seen in side of the cutting on the way to Morandoo.

Regards
John

----- Original Message -----
From: Phil Rickard
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2006 7:18 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Coffee Pot (Newcastle) info


--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, BLI BLI <alcogoodwin@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Jeff/all,
> While I can't answer this question I would
> like to extend it to ask what has become of the
> proposed replica that was to be built at Toronto.
> Is this project dead in the water like so many
> others?
>
> Thanks
> Brad
>

Brad et al,

Things don't look good according to the Toronto Coffee Pot Tramway &
Museum Society Inc. web site. http://home.kooee.com.au/ajl/cp/index.htm

Latest update states: "At the July 2006 meeting of Directors of the
TCPT&MS, it was decided that owing to the lack of support by various
Government authorities, that the Society be wound up. To that end, the
process of the disposal of assets has been initiated according to the
Society's constitution."

Looks like insurmountable problems due to some authority's requirement
regarding clearance from an adjacent cycle path.

There is a chronology of events and a contact address for anyone
interested. The society's web site is very interesting and given the
above statement, may be on borrowed time . . . (i.e. view it while you
can!)

cheers Phil


Re: Fowler indirect jackshaft drive locomotives

John Dennis <jdennis@...>
 

Michael,

One "lesser known" bit of information about the Fowler jackshaft loco
at Mourilyan is that it operated on South Australia's Eyre Peninsula,
being utilised during the construction of the Tod River reservoir. The
loco was built for Mourilyan in 1883, left there in 1913, and worked
on the peninsula from 1919 to 1921 when it was relocated to Adelaide.
It's a well-travelled little locomotive...

John

On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 11:19:45 -0000, "Michael J"
<thirtyinchfan@pearcedale.com> wrote:

I'm sure that everyone is aware of 2' gauge Fowler indirect jackshaft
drive locomotive in the sugar museum near Innisfail, formally in a
Melbourne scrap yard. I was under the impression that that was the
only one in Australia.


Re: Kerang - Koondrook

Frank Stamford
 

You can be assured several people have tried ...

Frank

At 10:21 PM 13/11/2006, you wrote:

--- In <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@...> wrote:

Today I was talking with a gentleman today who said he has seen the old
Ford truck from the KK Tramway on a property near Elmore.
As they say in the classics, someone "should" get it into a museum.

Cheers,

Michael


Waterloo Brickyards, Thornton

Iain
 

Also of interest to industrial archaeologist is the lovely panorama of
"Waterloo Brickyards, Thornton"



Unfortunately all this had been removed when I surveyed the area in the mid
1990s.



Most of the brickworks in this area closed by the 1980s and have been
demolished and swallowed up by urban development leaving only the former
Turtons Brickworks operating.



Dr Iain Stuart

JCIS Consultants



P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North



ph/fx (02) 97010191



HYPERLINK "mailto:iain@jcis.net.au"iain@jcis.net.au

HYPERLINK "mailto:iain_stuart@optusnet.com.au"iain_stuart@optusnet.com.au



Check out the website at HYPERLINK "http://www.jcis.net.au"www.jcis.net.au






--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
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Re: Fowler indirect jackshaft drive locomotives

Michael J
 

Mark K wrote:


Hi Michael,
The preserved sugar cane railway example is in fact an 0-4-2T, so we had
both 2-4-0T (Cobar et al) and 0-4-2T versions. There's a book on Hawaiian
sugar cane railways that has some great drawings of both wheel arrangements.
Hope that answers at least one of your questions!
Regards,
Mark K
Sydney Aus

-

.

.
Cheers, Mark, and I took photos of that loco... Michael


Re: Fowler indirect jackshaft drive locomotives

Mark Trainbrain
 

Hi Michael,
The preserved sugar cane railway example is in fact an 0-4-2T, so we had
both 2-4-0T (Cobar et al) and 0-4-2T versions. There's a book on Hawaiian
sugar cane railways that has some great drawings of both wheel arrangements.
Hope that answers at least one of your questions!
Regards,
Mark K
Sydney Aus

-----Original Message-----
From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf
Of Michael J
Sent: Monday, 13 November 2006 10:20 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Fowler indirect jackshaft drive locomotives

I'm sure that everyone is aware of 2' gauge Fowler indirect jackshaft
drive locomotive in the sugar museum near Innisfail, formally in a
Melbourne scrap yard. I was under the impression that that was the
only one in Australia.

Then I was browsing "Tall Timbers and Tramways" and there was a
picture of a 3'6" gauge version that was found on a couple of
Victorian timber tramways. And then that evening reading an article by
John Dennis in the latest issue of Narrow Gauge Downunder, there were
a whole swag of 2'6" gauge versions on the Cobar mine firewood tramways.

Now of course I've got a few questions, can anybody answer?

Were these half dozen the only ones in Australia? Were they all 2-4-0T
wheel arrangement? Were they all basicly the same design, even the
same size, just different gauges, or were they all unique designs?

They are sure interesting looking locos.

Cheers,

Michael Johnson





Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the
LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of the
LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and opinions
expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member nor of
the LRRSA Council of Management"

Yahoo!7 Groups Links


Re: Central Coast

The Bickfords <womloc4@...>
 

Hi Chris,

A pet interest of mine, having family holiday connections to Terrigal until the 1970's and working in the area in the early 1990's
I have a book here called 'The Brisbane Water Story, part three, Erina, Kincumber, Wamberal etc, written by C S Wanscott, published in 1954.
It has quite a detailed description of the timber getting around Terrigal and Avoca.
The timber mill at Terrigal was located at the Haven and was associated with a boat builder. Some sawn timber was also taken to Sydney.
They had a horse hauled timber railed tramline that went from Avoca Lake up the ridge and then down to the mill at Terrigal.
Operated in the 1870-80 period (?) by a Mr Tom Davis who pioneered the use of turpentine logs for wharf piers.
Tramway Road was built in 1918 and followed approximately along the line of part of the old horse tram.

Central Park Railway was located about where the waterslides are located, maybe a bit south.
A Fowler and Simplex diesels plus some rollingstock sat by the road for many years.

cheers,
Mike Bickford
Berowra, Sydney, Australia
www.ritginc.org

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Stratton" <gm4201@optusnet.com.au>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au>
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2006 8:34 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Central Coast


While I was on the NSW Central Coast on the weekend I read that there was a timber mill at Terrigal which had a tramway which ran towards North Avoca, there is a Tramway Ave at North Avoca which is on part of the route. Does anyone know where I could find more info?
I also drove past Forresters Beach about 6 times, where exactly was the Central Park Railway located? On the west side of the road just before the hill heading north up to Bateau Bay is a large retirement complex under construction, there are also some waterslides in behind there. Is this where it was?
On Sunday morning there were some markets in The Entrance and there were historical photos for sale. One was described as the original bridge at The Entrance under construction and it showed a timber deck with two pairs of steel rails running along it with points and a crossover between them. To me it looked more like a jetty, why would railway lines be laid on a timber bridge under constructon?

Regards,
Chris





Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"

Yahoo!7 Groups Links



Re: Kerang - Koondrook

Michael J
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@...> wrote:

Today I was talking with a gentleman today who said he has seen the old
Ford truck from the KK Tramway on a property near Elmore.

As they say in the classics, someone "should" get it into a museum.

Cheers,

Michael

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