Date   

Ray Graf

BM
 

Ross Mainwaring has provided the following advice regarding arrangements for Ray Graf's funeral and requested it be posted on this group. The funeral will be at 11am this Thursday, 6 January, at the Penhall Funeral Parlour, 33-35 William Street in East Orange.
Bob McKillop


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

Frank Stamford
 

Hello Eddie,

Thank you very much for that suggestion, which I will follow up later
when the project is more advanced.

Back in the 1970s I had quite a bit of correspondence with Frank
Stenvall when the LRRSA was selling the excellent English language
publication "Rail Scene" which Frank was publishing at that time.


Regards,

Frank



On 4/01/2011 12:27 AM, Eddie_Barnes wrote:

Seconded. I can think of several more titles, mostly Norwegian, but
none covering the 3'6" lines specifically.

As for a publisher, why not try Frank Stenvalls in Malmö? He has lots
of experience of publishing English-language titles, and the
connections to distrubute internationally.

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>,
Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@...> wrote:

Hello Brian,

Thanks for your comment.

I do not know of any books in any language covering the subject as a
whole. There are a several good histories of individual lines in
Norwegian (the Røros line in particular), and a very good (but long
out-of-print) history of the locomotives in Norwegian, but nothing
covering the subject as a whole.

At this stage I think I have most of the necessary source material, and
an outline structure of chapter headings. When I have more to show for
it I will be seeking a publisher in the UK but if necessary I will self
publish. I expect most of the market for such a book would be in
Europe,
not in the southern hemisphere, though early Queensland developments
will be partly covered in the book.

Regards,

Frank



On 3/01/2011 4:14 AM, Brian Rumary wrote:

Frank Stamford wrote:

Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

Eddie_Barnes
 

Seconded. I can think of several more titles, mostly Norwegian, but none covering the 3'6" lines specifically.

As for a publisher, why not try Frank Stenvalls in Malmö? He has lots of experience of publishing English-language titles, and the connections to distrubute internationally.

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@...> wrote:

Hello Brian,

Thanks for your comment.

I do not know of any books in any language covering the subject as a
whole. There are a several good histories of individual lines in
Norwegian (the Røros line in particular), and a very good (but long
out-of-print) history of the locomotives in Norwegian, but nothing
covering the subject as a whole.

At this stage I think I have most of the necessary source material, and
an outline structure of chapter headings. When I have more to show for
it I will be seeking a publisher in the UK but if necessary I will self
publish. I expect most of the market for such a book would be in Europe,
not in the southern hemisphere, though early Queensland developments
will be partly covered in the book.

Regards,

Frank



On 3/01/2011 4:14 AM, Brian Rumary wrote:

Frank Stamford wrote:

Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: FW: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods

John Browning
 

Thanks, Peter



I have already made some comment on the Industrial Railway Society (UK)
Yahoo group about the Queensland floods, so no need to repeat it here.

Australian members will no doubt recognise that the seasonal Queensland
floods make great TV news in a quiet period for other excitement, as well as
fertile opportunities for politicians to exploit.



Sorry to stray off topic.

Cheers



John






logo



John Browning

PO Box 99

Annerley 4103

Queensland

Australia









Phone +61 (0)7 3255 9084

Mobile 0407 069 199


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

rthorne475
 

Thank you, Frank.  Fascinating and I'll look forward to purchasing your book in due course!
Best wishes,
Richard

--- On Mon, 3/1/11, Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com> wrote:

From: Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Norwegian Museum Railways ...
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Date: Monday, 3 January, 2011, 0:10







 









On 3/01/2011 9:59 AM, richard horne wrote:

But don't the early 3'6"g. locos in Norway have more in common with
those in South Australia that in Queensland? Norway's Beyer, Peacock
2-4-0Ts with sloping cylinders dated from1873 and the SAR's W class
2-6-0s of 1877 were clearly a BP development of that design. I
imagine that the SAR V class 0-4-4Ts of 1876 were derived from the
Norwegian 0-4-4Ts of 1875, both being built by BP. Both systems used
centre couplings, whereas QGR used buffers and screw link couplings.
I seem to recall that either John Knowles or Bill Callaghan had an
interest in this, but I'm sure that you are well aware of it, too.
Richard
Hello Richard,



Yes there is also a close connection between the early South Australian

3ft 6in gauge and the Norwegian 3ft 6in gauge, and I intend to cover

that in the book. As things developed the South Australian 3ft 6in gauge

more closely resembled the Norwegian than did the Queensland.



Norway's Beyer, Peacock 2-4-0Ts with the sloping cylinders were an

extremely important development, as they greatly surpassed the previous

attempts at building 3ft 6in gauge locos in performance. They appear to

have been jointly designed by Carl Pihl (of Norway) and Charles Beyer.

The first was "Tryggve" BP builder's number 704 of June 1866, so they

predated the Isle of Man copies by a considerable time. Yes the SAR "V"

class derived from the Norwegian Type VI, but they were much smaller

than the Norwegian locos.



The early sequence of 3ft 6in gauge developments (as I see it) were:



1. 1862 - Hamar-Grundsett (Norway) railway opened - proved 3ft 6in gauge

would work for a public railway. Used link and pin couplings, and 0-4-2T

locomotives built by Robert Stephenson which had a rigid wheelbase and

recommended minimum curve radius of 15 chains.



2. 1864 - Trondheim-Støren (Norway) railway opened - proved 3ft 6in

gauge would work in difficult country. Still used link and pin

couplings, but locomotives were Avonside 2-4-0Ts with leading Bissell

truck, and much more successful on sharp curves (but the sharpest was 9

chains radius).



3. 1865 - 1867 Ipswich - Toowoomba railway opened - proved that 3ft 6in

gauge would work in mountainous country with very sharp curves (5 chains

radius). First locomotives were Avonside 2-4-0s - a tender version of

the locomotives already supplied to Norway. Did not use chopper

couplings as they had not been invented yet, and the English consultant

Charles Fox did not like the link and pin couplings.



4. 1866 - 1868 Drammen - Randsfjord (Norway) railway opened. First use

of chopper couplings, and first use of Beyer, Peacock sloping cylindered

2-4-0T locomotives. Both of these new developments were considered very

successful.



After that a frenzy of 3ft 6in gauge developments occurred throughout

the world.



It perplexes me why Queensland avoided using Beyer, Peacock locomotives

when they were used so successfully in all the other Australian

colonies. Possibly politicians or book-keepers made the decisions based

on lowest tender bids rather than long term cost effectiveness



Regards,



Frank



--- On Sun, 2/1/11, Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com
<mailto:frank.stamford%40bigpond.com>> wrote:
From: Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com
<mailto:frank.stamford%40bigpond.com>>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Norwegian Museum Railways ...
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Date: Sunday, 2 January, 2011, 20:47
Hello Brian,
Thanks for your comment.
I do not know of any books in any language covering the subject as a
whole. There are a several good histories of individual lines in
Norwegian (the Røros line in particular), and a very good (but long
out-of-print) history of the locomotives in Norwegian, but nothing
covering the subject as a whole.
At this stage I think I have most of the necessary source material, and
an outline structure of chapter headings. When I have more to show for
it I will be seeking a publisher in the UK but if necessary I will self
publish. I expect most of the market for such a book would be in Europe,
not in the southern hemisphere, though early Queensland developments
will be partly covered in the book.
Regards,
Frank
On 3/01/2011 4:14 AM, Brian Rumary wrote:
Frank Stamford wrote:
Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.
Brian Rumary, England
www.rumary.co.uk
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Wodonga - Cudgewa Railway

Michael J
 

To bring this topic within the pervue of the LRRSA, the report into narrow gauge railways that resulted in the building of the four 2'6" gauge lines we are familiar with, proposed Tallangatta - Corryong as a possible route for a narrow gauge line, before the broad gauge line was build. That really would have been shades of Colorado with narrow gauge stock specials rumbling over those trestles and around those hills. It was also proposed to build a narrow gauge line south from Tallangatta into the Alps.

Michael

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "lockeddrive" <lockeddrive@...> wrote:

Many thanks to all respondents for the info. received.

Cheers

Claus


Re: RVR - Orangegrove Station (Dec 2010)

Toot222
 

Brad
You did well in finding what you did, looks like 4 wheel drive country.
Steve Chapman

On Mon, Jan 3, 2011 at 4:43 PM, Brad Peadon PdOB
<alcogoodwin@yahoo.com.au>wrote:

Howdee everyone,
Have just put up some photos of Orangegrove
station taken on the last day of 2010. Thought they may be of interest.


http://hunter-coal.blogspot.com/2011/01/wikipedia-richmond-vale-railway-minmi.html

Brad



South Maitland Railways - http://hunter-coal.blogspot.com/
Philippine Railway Hist Society - http://philippine-railways.blogspot.com
Semi-Retired Foamer - http://alcogoodwin.blogspot.com/
Manila Sunset Convenience Store - http://manila-sunset.blogspot.com

~ William (Bill) James Sullivan - 1949-2010 - Never To Be Forgotten ~







------------------------------------

Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA
publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the
LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of
the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and
opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member
nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"
Yahoo!7 Groups Links




RVR - Orangegrove Station (Dec 2010)

Brad Peadon PdOB <alcogoodwin@...>
 

Howdee everyone,
                          Have just put up some photos of Orangegrove station taken on the last day of 2010. Thought they may be of interest.
 
http://hunter-coal.blogspot.com/2011/01/wikipedia-richmond-vale-railway-minmi.html
 
Brad
 


South Maitland Railways - http://hunter-coal.blogspot.com/
Philippine Railway Hist Society - http://philippine-railways.blogspot.com
Semi-Retired Foamer - http://alcogoodwin.blogspot.com/
Manila Sunset Convenience Store - http://manila-sunset.blogspot.com

~ William (Bill) James Sullivan - 1949-2010 - Never To Be Forgotten ~



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


VIC: Bogong Creek Tramway

Steamfreak <steamfreak@...>
 

Hi all,

I took a pleasant stroll along the Bogong Creek Tramway yesterday. I began
at the Clover Arboretum (near Clover Power Station on the Falls Creek Rd)
and headed down the Little Arthur Fire Trail down to the East Kiewa River
and up to the start (end?) of the aqueduct. At the rail depot/shed there
were a variety of rail vehicles, including a shed on rails, a locomotive of
some sort, a flat car sitting on two hinged underframes, and a passenger
trolley on the shed. Most of the wagons seemed to be built on the same type
of Robert Hudson underframes.



The aqueduct itself is currently out of order due to a number of recent
landslips blocking it, but the tramway is intact and has seen recent use. I
wandered along the line, looks like all wooden sleepers have been replaced
with steel ones, except for under some sets of points. The steel sleepers
are stamped Trak-Lok 25-03-03 and are punched for presumably 2' track as
well as 3'.



It was a most pleasant walk, with a couple of sidings along the way, one
featuring a couple of side-tip cocopans (is that the right term for these?)
and a couple of tankers. The cocopans had Robert Hudson builders plates
too. One corner featured a rather large black snake warming itself
partially under the end of one of the steel sleepers.



About 6km along the aqueduct I reached the Big River Fire Trail and stopped
for lunch. In the siding sat a rustin' Ruston locomotive and a wide flat
car loaded with sleepers. The Ruston appeared to be in working order. At
that point, the aqueduct was closed off by a big gate and fence with sign
saying "Danger - Death or Worse" or words to that effect. This was
disappointing as I had wanted to go right up to Bogong Creek. The "Keep
Out" signs seem to be honoured more in the breach than in the observance,
judging by the well worn foot track through the barbed wire fence.



I had met a walking party earlier who had walked down from the High Plains
and come right along the aqueduct, and they said there were major landslides
along the section to Bogong Creek that had brought down trees and at one
point destroyed a tramway bridge. This landslide is visible on Google Earth
so it is not new, but they said there were a number of recent large
landslides too.



Anyway, not to be deterred, I detoured up the Big River Fire Trail for
another 6km or so to reach the East Kiewa Fire Trail, and headed down there
to Bogong Creek. An impromptu spa bath under a waterfall was most pleasant
after the hot walk. The East Kiewa Fire Trail is impassable at that point,
being gouged out to a depth of 1-2m for a width of 20m or so due to the
torrent that had recently come down the mountain. Any intake infrastructure
that existed there on the aqueduct is now no longer either, just a wide
expanse of washed up river rocks. There is still a concrete intake gate and
hut, but it is high and dry and half full of rocks. The aqueduct is in a
pipe there and the tramway doesn't appear to extend that far along. Return
to Clover Power Station was via Big River Fire Trail and a short walk back
along the Falls Creek Rd. Total distance around 20km.



A most interesting walk in any case, the scenery along that tramway is
spectacular to say the least, and would be more so in winter. My original
reason for heading up there was to scope out some possible routes up Mt.
Bogong for a ski trip this winter, so I will be back there in the colder
months to view the scenery again!



Photos here: http://pics.steamfreak.com/thumbnails.php?album=247



Cheers,

Trevor Staats.


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Frank Stamford
 

Hello all,

I think I have a foundation date for the VLRRS, (which became the LRRSA)!

The opening paragraph of the first Secretary's Report says that it is
for the Year Ending 17 February 1962.

Such a precise date tells me that the foundation meeting must have been
held on 18 February 1961, which is very much in line with my estimate.

The report said that membership had increased from 5 to 10, that six
ordinary general meetings were held during the year, and that "the
Society has held expeditions over abandoned tramways near Warburton and
Powelltown".

Frank

On 3/01/2011 9:58 AM, rnveditor wrote:

I have added the last of the Sat.1.3.69 photos taken at Belmont
Common. Most of the younger people must have been BCR associates, not
our own.
33a: ?, Ralph Cleary, ?, ?, ?
33b: no recognition
35: no recognition
36: Closest is Laurie Savage; distant may be Andrew & David Hennell.
37: driver John Scott
38: left to right from cab: ?, possibly Michael Menzies, Laurie
Savage, ?, possibly David & Andrew Hennell.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: Wodonga - Cudgewa Railway

steamfreak711 <steamfreak@...>
 

Hi Claus,
There are a bunch of photos of the remaining bridges and other remnants of the line on my photo site here:

http://pics.steamfreak.com/index.php?cat=17

Cheers,
Trevor.

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "lockeddrive" <lockeddrive@...> wrote:

Many thanks to all respondents for the info. received.

Cheers

Claus


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

Frank Stamford
 

On 3/01/2011 9:59 AM, richard horne wrote:

But don't the early 3'6"g. locos in Norway have more in common with
those in South Australia that in Queensland? Norway's Beyer, Peacock
2-4-0Ts with sloping cylinders dated from1873 and the SAR's W class
2-6-0s of 1877 were clearly a BP development of that design. I
imagine that the SAR V class 0-4-4Ts of 1876 were derived from the
Norwegian 0-4-4Ts of 1875, both being built by BP. Both systems used
centre couplings, whereas QGR used buffers and screw link couplings.
I seem to recall that either John Knowles or Bill Callaghan had an
interest in this, but I'm sure that you are well aware of it, too.

Richard
Hello Richard,

Yes there is also a close connection between the early South Australian
3ft 6in gauge and the Norwegian 3ft 6in gauge, and I intend to cover
that in the book. As things developed the South Australian 3ft 6in gauge
more closely resembled the Norwegian than did the Queensland.

Norway's Beyer, Peacock 2-4-0Ts with the sloping cylinders were an
extremely important development, as they greatly surpassed the previous
attempts at building 3ft 6in gauge locos in performance. They appear to
have been jointly designed by Carl Pihl (of Norway) and Charles Beyer.
The first was "Tryggve" BP builder's number 704 of June 1866, so they
predated the Isle of Man copies by a considerable time. Yes the SAR "V"
class derived from the Norwegian Type VI, but they were much smaller
than the Norwegian locos.

The early sequence of 3ft 6in gauge developments (as I see it) were:

1. 1862 - Hamar-Grundsett (Norway) railway opened - proved 3ft 6in gauge
would work for a public railway. Used link and pin couplings, and 0-4-2T
locomotives built by Robert Stephenson which had a rigid wheelbase and
recommended minimum curve radius of 15 chains.

2. 1864 - Trondheim-Støren (Norway) railway opened - proved 3ft 6in
gauge would work in difficult country. Still used link and pin
couplings, but locomotives were Avonside 2-4-0Ts with leading Bissell
truck, and much more successful on sharp curves (but the sharpest was 9
chains radius).

3. 1865 - 1867 Ipswich - Toowoomba railway opened - proved that 3ft 6in
gauge would work in mountainous country with very sharp curves (5 chains
radius). First locomotives were Avonside 2-4-0s - a tender version of
the locomotives already supplied to Norway. Did not use chopper
couplings as they had not been invented yet, and the English consultant
Charles Fox did not like the link and pin couplings.

4. 1866 - 1868 Drammen - Randsfjord (Norway) railway opened. First use
of chopper couplings, and first use of Beyer, Peacock sloping cylindered
2-4-0T locomotives. Both of these new developments were considered very
successful.

After that a frenzy of 3ft 6in gauge developments occurred throughout
the world.

It perplexes me why Queensland avoided using Beyer, Peacock locomotives
when they were used so successfully in all the other Australian
colonies. Possibly politicians or book-keepers made the decisions based
on lowest tender bids rather than long term cost effectiveness

Regards,

Frank






--- On Sun, 2/1/11, Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com
<mailto:frank.stamford%40bigpond.com>> wrote:

From: Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com
<mailto:frank.stamford%40bigpond.com>>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Norwegian Museum Railways ...
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Date: Sunday, 2 January, 2011, 20:47



Hello Brian,

Thanks for your comment.

I do not know of any books in any language covering the subject as a

whole. There are a several good histories of individual lines in

Norwegian (the Røros line in particular), and a very good (but long

out-of-print) history of the locomotives in Norwegian, but nothing

covering the subject as a whole.

At this stage I think I have most of the necessary source material, and

an outline structure of chapter headings. When I have more to show for

it I will be seeking a publisher in the UK but if necessary I will self

publish. I expect most of the market for such a book would be in Europe,

not in the southern hemisphere, though early Queensland developments

will be partly covered in the book.

Regards,

Frank

On 3/01/2011 4:14 AM, Brian Rumary wrote:

Frank Stamford wrote:
Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.
Brian Rumary, England
www.rumary.co.uk
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Wodonga - Cudgewa Railway

lockeddrive <lockeddrive@...>
 

Many thanks to all respondents for the info. received.

Cheers

Claus


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

rthorne475
 

But don't the early 3'6"g. locos in Norway have more in common with those in South Australia that in Queensland?  Norway's Beyer, Peacock 2-4-0Ts with sloping cylinders dated from1873 and the SAR's W class 2-6-0s of 1877 were clearly a BP development of that design.  I imagine that the SAR V class 0-4-4Ts of 1876 were derived from the Norwegian 0-4-4Ts of 1875, both being built by BP.  Both systems used centre couplings, whereas QGR used buffers and screw link couplings.  I seem to recall that either John Knowles or Bill Callaghan had an interest in this, but I'm sure that you are well aware of it, too.

Richard

--- On Sun, 2/1/11, Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com> wrote:

From: Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com>
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Norwegian Museum Railways ...
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Date: Sunday, 2 January, 2011, 20:47







 









Hello Brian,



Thanks for your comment.



I do not know of any books in any language covering the subject as a

whole. There are a several good histories of individual lines in

Norwegian (the Røros line in particular), and a very good (but long

out-of-print) history of the locomotives in Norwegian, but nothing

covering the subject as a whole.



At this stage I think I have most of the necessary source material, and

an outline structure of chapter headings. When I have more to show for

it I will be seeking a publisher in the UK but if necessary I will self

publish. I expect most of the market for such a book would be in Europe,

not in the southern hemisphere, though early Queensland developments

will be partly covered in the book.



Regards,



Frank



On 3/01/2011 4:14 AM, Brian Rumary wrote:

Frank Stamford wrote:
Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.
Brian Rumary, England
www.rumary.co.uk


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Roderick Smith
 

I have added the last of the Sat.1.3.69 photos taken at Belmont Common. Most of the younger people must have been BCR associates, not our own.
33a: ?, Ralph Cleary, ?, ?, ?
33b: no recognition
35: no recognition
36: Closest is Laurie Savage; distant may be Andrew & David Hennell.
37: driver John Scott
38: left to right from cab: ?, possibly Michael Menzies, Laurie Savage, ?, possibly David & Andrew Hennell.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: FW: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods

Petan
 

John Browning's address & contact details are on the bottom of his emails.



Cheers

Peter C

QLD



From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf
Of Christopher Hart
Sent: Sunday, 2 January 2011 9:22 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] FW: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods

Brian,
John doesn't live in Rockhampton these days but I'll let him enlighten you
as to his whereabouts,
Chris Hart

On 1 January 2011 22:20, Brian Rumary <brian@rumary.co.uk> wrote:


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

Frank Stamford
 

Hello Brian,

Thanks for your comment.

I do not know of any books in any language covering the subject as a
whole. There are a several good histories of individual lines in
Norwegian (the Røros line in particular), and a very good (but long
out-of-print) history of the locomotives in Norwegian, but nothing
covering the subject as a whole.

At this stage I think I have most of the necessary source material, and
an outline structure of chapter headings. When I have more to show for
it I will be seeking a publisher in the UK but if necessary I will self
publish. I expect most of the market for such a book would be in Europe,
not in the southern hemisphere, though early Queensland developments
will be partly covered in the book.

Regards,

Frank



On 3/01/2011 4:14 AM, Brian Rumary wrote:

Frank Stamford wrote:

Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

B.Rumary
 

Frank Stamford wrote:

Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work.
That should be worth waiting for; I don't know of _any_ books on the
subject in English. Don't forget to let us know the details when it
finally comes out.

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Roderick Smith
 

I am back from a boating week, so the series resumes at the correct progress date.
On Sat.1.3.69, from Cheetham Geelong the group moved to Belmont Common Railway. This was a preservation group based on the surviving equipment from the Fyansford - Batesford 1067 mm gauge line, built to haul limestone for cement making, but by then superseded by a conveyor belt.
Today BCR survives as Bellarine Peninsula Railway, on the regauged Drysdale - Queenscliff former VR line; the Fyansford cement factory has been closed and demolished.

In today's four photos, I can recognise only Ralph Cleary (busy filming on the wagon). I suspect that all of the younger people were either general public, sharing the operating session with our VRLRRs/LRRSA group, or were associates of BCR.

The driver was John Scott. He was pushing the dead Vulcan, using the Hudswell Clark, past a photoline; he misjudged the braking needed.

On a later occasion he gave me my first lesson in handling steam power. The most important lesson to learn is keeping up the water level in the boiler (ahead of proper lubrication, ahead of maintaining sufficient steam for the train to move). I still recall these lessons when aboard paddlesteamers, although these normally use feedwater pumps rather than injectors.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: FW: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods

A C Lynn Zelmer
 

Depends on what you mean by narrow gauge, Brian, when thinking of Rockhampton...

QR's 3' 6" gauge main yards and engine facilities are all under water at Rocky with enough water over the track that rail services to the south have apparently been cut. All the motive power has been moved to the Yaamba area to the north where it is comparatively dry.

The Purrey steam tram is out of service at the moment for its annual inspection/maintenance but the museum should only be affected by the flooding if it exceeds the 1918 flood levels. Maps from that flood show the water as just reaching the museum precinct.

The city is now essentially surrounded with no road, rail or air connections to the outside world, and is likely to remain so for the next couple of weeks as the floods aren't expected to peak until mid-week (Wednesday 5 Jan 2011). The sugar cane areas are a fair way north and south of the city and have their own problems... I understand that the Bundaberg Rum distillery is surrounded with water, implying that the sugar mill is also wet, but the local news only talks about the distillery.

Best wishes to all for the new year,
Lynn

The following was just posted on the Industrial Railway Society Yahoo
list. Does anyone know what the situation in Queensland is regarding
narrow gauge railway matters?

Brian Rumary, England

===================================================

to: Industrial Railway Society
<IndustrialRailwaySociety@yahoogroups.com>
from: Bigrabbits <bigrabbits@yahoo.co.uk>
date: Sat, 1 Jan 2011 00:33:36 +0000 (GMT)
subject: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods
reply-to: IndustrialRailwaySociety@yahoogroups.com



Large areas of Queensland are currently flooded to unprecedented
levels.

This no doubt affects the sugar cane lines and railway preservation
sites there.

Bundaberg was listed on the news and they are arranging to evacuate
parts of Rockhampton.

Rockhampton will be known to many as the home of the Purrey Steam tram
but it is also the home of Lancashire ex-pat, IRS member and member of
this Group, John Browning.

John, we sincerely hope you are not affected by the floods and send our
Best Wishes for the New Year.

Graham, Terry and family.






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--
Lynn Zelmer
Box 1414, Rockhampton QLD 4700 Australia
http://www.zelmeroz.com

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