Date   

Re: FW: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods

Christopher Hart
 

Brian,
I live in the Herbert district in North Queensland where the trackage is
flood damaged on a fairly regular basis, including now. Each time, It all
gets repaired and come the crushing season, it's business as usual for the
cane trains.

John doesn't live in Rockhampton these days but I'll let him enlighten you
as to his whereabouts,
Chris Hart

On 1 January 2011 22:20, Brian Rumary <brian@rumary.co.uk> wrote:



The following was just posted on the Industrial Railway Society Yahoo
list. Does anyone know what the situation in Queensland is regarding
narrow gauge railway matters?

Brian Rumary, England

===================================================

to: Industrial Railway Society
<IndustrialRailwaySociety@yahoogroups.com<IndustrialRailwaySociety%40yahoogroups.com>
from: Bigrabbits <bigrabbits@yahoo.co.uk <bigrabbits%40yahoo.co.uk>>
date: Sat, 1 Jan 2011 00:33:36 +0000 (GMT)
subject: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods
reply-to: IndustrialRailwaySociety@yahoogroups.com<IndustrialRailwaySociety%40yahoogroups.com>

Large areas of Queensland are currently flooded to unprecedented
levels.

This no doubt affects the sugar cane lines and railway preservation
sites there.

Bundaberg was listed on the news and they are arranging to evacuate
parts of Rockhampton.

Rockhampton will be known to many as the home of the Purrey Steam tram
but it is also the home of Lancashire ex-pat, IRS member and member of
this Group, John Browning.

John, we sincerely hope you are not affected by the floods and send our
Best Wishes for the New Year.

Graham, Terry and family.


FW: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods

B.Rumary
 

The following was just posted on the Industrial Railway Society Yahoo
list. Does anyone know what the situation in Queensland is regarding
narrow gauge railway matters?

Brian Rumary, England

===================================================

to: Industrial Railway Society
<IndustrialRailwaySociety@yahoogroups.com>
from: Bigrabbits <bigrabbits@yahoo.co.uk>
date: Sat, 1 Jan 2011 00:33:36 +0000 (GMT)
subject: [IndustrialRailwaySociety] Queensland Floods
reply-to: IndustrialRailwaySociety@yahoogroups.com



Large areas of Queensland are currently flooded to unprecedented
levels.

This no doubt affects the sugar cane lines and railway preservation
sites there.

Bundaberg was listed on the news and they are arranging to evacuate
parts of Rockhampton.

Rockhampton will be known to many as the home of the Purrey Steam tram
but it is also the home of Lancashire ex-pat, IRS member and member of
this Group, John Browning.

John, we sincerely hope you are not affected by the floods and send our
Best Wishes for the New Year.

Graham, Terry and family.


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

Frank Stamford
 

Hello John,

Thanks for the feedback.

With regard to the Oslo-Trondheim page, I am afraid the map is not a
mistake. It is the Oslo-Bergen map recycled with the names of Trondheim
and Dombås added. As I wanted to wind that project up before the year
ended I needed to take a short cut, though I am not very happy with it.

For the same reason there is no route map of the Old Voss Railway or the
Krøderen railway, though the Old Voss Railway, especially, needs one.
Later this year I hope to start writing a book on Norwegian 3ft 6in
gauge railways, and that will need a lot of map work. As a spin-off of
that process I should be able to provide better maps on the website.

Any feedback on the need for corrections on the website is greatly
welcomed, and providing making the corrections is not too time consuming
I will happily do it.

By the way, I think the strange weight driven device in the waiting room
of Ilseng station at the Hamar Railway Museum is probably a clock, with
the clock-face on the other side of the wall in the station-master's office.

Regards,

Frank

On 1/01/2011 6:55 PM, John Dennis wrote:

Excellent work Frank,

Thanks for taking the time to do this.

One minor correction. The Oslo-Trondheim page, with the views from the
moving train, has the Oslo-Bergen map.

John

On Fri, 31 Dec 2010 12:42:48 -0000, "Frank"
<frank.stamford@bigpond.com <mailto:frank.stamford%40bigpond.com>> wrote:

Hello all,

Over the past week I have escaped from LRRSA matters and have been
processing the photographs I took in Norway in July-August.
==========================================================
John Dennis jdennis@optusnet.com.au <mailto:jdennis%40optusnet.com.au>
Melbourne,Australia Home of the HOn30 Dutton Bay Tramway
and the Australian Narrow Gauge Web-Exhibition Gallery
Dutton Bay URL: http://members.optusnet.com.au/duttonbay
WebX http://members.optusnet.com.au/jdennis/ng_webex.html


Re: Norwegian Museum Railways ...

John Dennis <jdennis@...>
 

Excellent work Frank,

Thanks for taking the time to do this.

One minor correction. The Oslo-Trondheim page, with the views from the
moving train, has the Oslo-Bergen map.

John

On Fri, 31 Dec 2010 12:42:48 -0000, "Frank"
<frank.stamford@bigpond.com> wrote:

Hello all,

Over the past week I have escaped from LRRSA matters and have been processing the photographs I took in Norway in July-August.
==========================================================
John Dennis jdennis@optusnet.com.au
Melbourne,Australia Home of the HOn30 Dutton Bay Tramway
and the Australian Narrow Gauge Web-Exhibition Gallery
Dutton Bay URL: http://members.optusnet.com.au/duttonbay
WebX http://members.optusnet.com.au/jdennis/ng_webex.html


Re: Wodonga to Corryong railway history

halfpilotstaff
 

Hi Claus,

The one I have is part of a series called Country Branch Lines Victoria, published by Train Hobby Publications.

This one is subtitled "The Wodonga to Cudgewa Branch Line" - A Photographic Profile 1950s - 1979 Part 4. My guess is the "parts" refer to other branch lines covered in the series.

The book consists of large landscape format colour photos, with just enough supporting text.

I bought my copy ($39) at the ARHS bookshop in Sydney Terminal station; I would presume that most bookshops that specialise in railway publications would have it for sale.

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "lockeddrive" <lockeddrive@...> wrote:

Happy New Year All.

Travelled the Murray Valley Highway yesterday ( magnificent countryside ) & noticed many old timber trestles still standing ( & some quite tall ones, shades of Colorado ! ) .

Does anyone know of any publications/ photos/ history of this line; shame the rails are gone as it would potentially have made a great tourist line.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Claus


Re: Wodonga to Corryong railway history

Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...>
 

On 1/01/2011 09:47, lockeddrive wrote:
Happy New Year All.

Travelled the Murray Valley Highway yesterday ( magnificent countryside )& noticed many old timber trestles still standing (& some quite tall ones, shades of Colorado ! ) .

Does anyone know of any publications/ photos/ history of this line; shame the rails are gone as it would potentially have made a great tourist line.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Cudgewa, not Corryong. Standard reference is

The branch line : a history of the Wodonga-Tallangatta-Cudgewa railway / by Lloyd Holmes

sometimes appears on ebay, probably available from other sources, it's far from rare


Wodonga to Corryong railway history

lockeddrive <lockeddrive@...>
 

Happy New Year All.

Travelled the Murray Valley Highway yesterday ( magnificent countryside ) & noticed many old timber trestles still standing ( & some quite tall ones, shades of Colorado ! ) .

Does anyone know of any publications/ photos/ history of this line; shame the rails are gone as it would potentially have made a great tourist line.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Claus


Norwegian Museum Railways ...

Frank Stamford
 

Hello all,

Over the past week I have escaped from LRRSA matters and have been processing the photographs I took in Norway in July-August.

As a result I have just updated my website:

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Trip_Menu.html

More specifically, the changes that have been made are:

(1) Norwegian Railway Museum:

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Hamar_Railway_Museum.html

What was one page has now been expanded to about six. In many respects I think this might be one of the best set up railway museums in the world, although most of the rolling stock items are difficult to photograph due to confined space.

(2) Old Voss Railway

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Gamle_Vossebanen.html

This is a new page and relates to a standard gauge (former 3ft 6in) museum railway near Bergen.

(3) Krøderen Railway

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Kroderbanen.html

This is Norway's longest museum railway (26 km). I have added a number of new photographs, and replaced some with better ones.

(4) Trondheim Tramway

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Trondheim%20Trams.html

This is a new page and it relates to Trondheim's metre gauge electric tramway which climbs a hill on its own right-of-way, and is more like a narrow-gauge railway than a city tramway.

(5) Oslo - Trondheim

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Oslo_Trondheim.html

This is a new page, and contains shots of scenery taken from a moving train

(6) Oslo - Bergen

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Oslo_Bergen.html

This is an existing page of scenic shots taken from moving trains to which I have added some extra photos, including one of a rotary steam snow plough at Finse, which parked itself outside my window while I was having lunch in the buffet car.

(7) Lysøen

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~telica/Norway_Lysoen.html

This is the extraordinary house on an island near Bergen which was built by Ole Bull, a world famous nineteenth century violinist. The only remote connection to railways is that Ole Bull's brother was the first architect for Norwegian Railways and was responsible for almost all the railway stations in the 1860s and 1870s, but he certainly was not responsible for this strange over-decorated house!

None of that has any direct relevance to the LRRSA, but Norway may have been responsible for inflicting 3ft 6in gauge upon us.

By the way I have used the term "museum railway" rather than "preserved railway" since there seems to be an over-riding philosophy to operate these lines as they did in the past, with as little interference with the original fabric or operating procedures as possible.

Regards,

Frank


Another Theft

jf11885
 

The Builders Plate from Diesel Locomotive DH5 has gone missing (believed stolen). If anyone sees the plate inscribed with the words "Diesel, Hydraulic, Walkers Ltd Locomotive 587" we would appreciate you contacting John Hoy on +61 3 9757 0700 or email info@pbr.org.au. Your assistance in retrieving this missing Railway artefact would be greatly appreciated.

To see a photo of the missing builders plate, go to Puffing Billy's website: http://www.puffingbilly.com.au/?id=locomotivefleet


Ray Graf

Paul Dove <pd2@...>
 

This message from the Campbelltown Steam and Machinery Museum tonight. Ray will be greatly missed by all in the Light Railway circles.

It is my sad duty to inform you that Ray Graf was found deceased in his home earlier this evening. I will keep you informed of any service for Ray so that you may pay your respects.

A driving force of the raliways for many years, a very passionate light railways enthusiast and photographer, attended every rally since he joined the society, always willing to help friends, he will be sorley missed.

Regards to all,


LRRSA accolades

Iain
 

Bob,



That was me posting on the TICCIH in Oz website. TICCIH is roughly the
industrial heritage equivalent of ICOMOS (we act as ICOMOS's advisor on
industrial heritage matters) so we are focused on trying to preserve
industrial heritage around the world, and particularly in Australia.



I have always thought the LRRSA an excellent example of high quality
archaeological and historical research, an example I can only hope to
emulate in my research. The manual is a really good example of what can be
achieved. Good research is the foundation for preservation, interpretation
and management of industrial sites and landscapes.



Anyone can join in the discussion on TICCIH in OZ and if you feel up to it
join TICCIH international (it's so easy I accidently joined twice!).



Yours



Dr Iain Stuart

Partner

JCIS Consultants



TICCIH Board member

see the TICCIH in Oz discussion group at

http://groups.google.com.au/group/ticcih-in-oz?hl=en


LRRSA accalades

BM
 

The Federation of Australian Museum Societies Inc. is the peak body representing the interests of historical societies throughout Australia. In its e-Bulletin to members of 18 December it reports as follows:
Timber sawmill historical archaeological survey manual
The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage has circulated on its ListServ the timber sawmill manual of the Light Railways Research Society of Australian Inc (LRRSA) as it considers it a good model of how to do a targeted historical/industrial archaeological field survey. It can be accessed through the LRRSA website.

Bob McKillop


VR Walhalla line construction - photo book

Graeme Inglis
 

I found advertised on Ebay copies of "Steam on the Lens - Walhalla Railway Construction" (Vol 2). It is a magnificent 111 page book of wonderful photos by Wilf Henty, published in 2002 with Jihn Kiely and Russell Savage as authors. I already have a copy of this book, but I thought other LRRSA members might be interested.

It is listed at a price of $34-95 and postage (amount not listed) would be extra. The Ebay item number is: 380276109709 and the auction closes in 6 days 15 hours 15 mins (from 6.30pm 28/12) which I make to be 3rd January. Simply logging on to Ebay and typing in the item number will take you directly to it. Apparently there are 4 copies still available.

I should also make it quite clear that I have no connection whatsoever with the on-line bookshop selling this.

Regards and a Happy New Year 2011 to all.

Graeme Inglis


Re: Poverty Point bridge (Walhalla)

Marie and David Lowe
 

Three snaps been added to my Cooper's Creek file. A couple I took in 1967 after
plunging eastward into the Thomson Valley from Amors Mill Site with a few Rover
Scout mates, and one scanned from Lou de Prada's book My Walhalla which shows
the nature of the countryside just after construction and tramway easements
visible on the western side of the river.
Also, I have compiled a couple of articles for our local newspaper (the Thomson
Times) regarding the bridge and the community that developed there, which I am
happy to share. Do I just attach them or is there a far more tekalogical
approach.
I will add a couple more snaps taken prior to the bushfire soon.
Cheers David





________________________________
From: Frank Stamford <frank.stamford@bigpond.com>
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Thu, 23 December, 2010 1:05:33 AM
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Re: Poverty Point bridge (Walhalla)



It is good to see this bridge has been redecked.

You can find some information about it in Light Railways No.28 page 20,
No.29 page 7, and very good photographs of it (before it was redecked)
in LR No.33 page 25. In a later issue of LR, which I cannot locate in a
hurry (possibly around No.55), there is a phograph of a helicopter
delivering redecking materials.

In 1969 there were rumours the bridge was going to be blown up by the
army as an exercise. I don't know whether the rumours were well founded,
but the LRRSA took action to bring the bridge's historical significance
to attention to prevent such a thing happening.

Regards,

Frank

On 23/12/2010 10:58 AM, rnveditor wrote:

Thanks Rod,
I won't need them personally, but they could be placed in an album in
the group's photos section (you have to get there via the Yahoo website).

When I was fairly new to VLRRS, people talked of the bridge in hushed
tones: nobody was sure that it existed. It was erected in the factory
yard (South Melbourne?), then each part was numbered and the whole lot
was taken in by packhorse from Toongabbie: the bridge predated VR's
Walhalla line. One senior rembered seeing the painted numbers on the
pieces in his early exploration (1930s or 40s).

I found it in 1971, by bushbashing down from the road and landing at
just the right spot.
A second attempt a few years later was less successful: I landed to
far downstream. My group waded up the river and reached the bridge.

When it became part of the alpine trail, the approach trails were
cleared on each side.

On a weekend of exploration based on staying at Rawson, LRRSA walked
in from the VR and road Thomson bridges: up Mormontown Track, then
along the former tramline to the bridge.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

Rod Hutchinson <r.hutchinson@...> wrote:
...I may have some photos if you would like...


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Roderick Smith
 

I jumped sequence to put up four photos of the 1975 LRRSA tour which included Lune River & Ida Bay, as this may tempt more to join the coming February tour.
GT13: me
GT16: I can't pick any.
GT18: Arthur Straffen in the grey sports jacket, and probably Graeme Inglis (with beard) beside him.
GT21: I can't pick any.

Fri.13.6.75: We flew into Devonport in the evening, and stayed at Formby Hotel.
Sat.14: Devonport, Don, Burnie, Tullah, Williamsford. I can't recall our accommodation, but it must have been Zeehan.
Sun.15: Zeehan museum and alignments, Queenstown, North Mt Lyell, on to Hobart. We stayed in a nice art-deco hotel, the name of which escapes me.
Mon.16: Lune River, Hobart roundhouse, TTM at Glenorchy. I am not sure if we flew home from Hobart, or if we had to return to Devonport.

This project is now on hold for a week.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Roderick Smith
 

I have added the last four of the Cheetham Geelong component of the Sat.1.3.69 tour.
* Photo 20: Lionel Rickard, Phil Rickard, ?, Barry Stewart? (the check jacket sleeve will be Frank Stamford)
* 21: The only one whom I can identify is Steve Martin, in the far distance. He became a long-serving sales officer.
* 24:
on the left ?, ?, David Hennell (standing), probably Andrew Hennell (obscured), probably Ralph Cleary (with camera), ?, ?.
on the right: Les Poole, ?, Steve Martin, ?, ?, possibly Phil Rickard, Frank Stamford ?, ?, ?, ?.
* 25: ?, Cheetham driver, ?, ?, ?, ?.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: Latest LRRSA mini-tour - the Dutton Bay Tramway

Frank Stamford
 

On 23/12/2010 9:19 PM, John Dennis wrote:

Sometimes we all get a bit too serious...

The LRRSA ran a highly successful mini-tour on Monday December 20, to
the Dutton Bay Tramway. The tramway will be running its last train on
December 28, and a special train was supplied to provide the members
present with a tour of the line. The Dutton Bay is a prime candidate
for LRRSA interest, being a private, industrial, narrow gauge railway,
although the gauge of 9mm might be considered a little too narrow for
some. :-)

Members present were Frank Stamford, Mike McCarthy, Grant McAdam and
John Dennis, with three guests along for the ride.

There's a couple of photos of this day, plus another "farewell" tour
run a month earlier, on this Railpage thread:

http://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11359668.htm

Cheers,
John
Yes I was a guest driver on the occasion, working under expert guidance.
It is an amazingly well set up model railway worked to timetable with
multiple operators and with a highly credible story and scenic
background behind it.

Frank.


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Frank Stamford
 

Excellent photograph of John Prideaux. he was the Hon. Treasurer in
1967-68, 1968-69, and 1969-70. He was also on the Constitution
Committee. John was a rock of common sense who played a key role in
navigating the organisation through difficult times leading up to the
election of the Constitution Committee.

To clarify things for readers of this list, Roderick was a member of the
Constitution Committee and its Secretary. He was the President in
1969-70 taking office immediately after the new Constution was adopted,
and the Hon. Treasurer in 1970-71 and 1971-72.

There is not much activity on this list at the moment, but hopefully it
will get a little more lively later. People have other things on their
mind - Father Christmas is making his deliveries tonight. I think I can
hear him on my roof right now - or it/could/ be possums ...

Regards,

Frank

On 24/12/2010 7:36 PM, rnveditor wrote:

Frank's proper coverage of the Les incident was appreciated: a half
recollection is now converted to true history.
Les was surprisingly agile on that crutch. He hopped out at lineside
photostops on mainline tours with the best; now nobody (let alone a
movement-impaired person) is allowed to light mid section, even from
carriages equipped with ground level stairwells. Only once that I can
recall Les was unable to move clear of the main photo line in time.

In photo 17, the man in the hat must have been our Cheetham driver.

Today:
* Photo 11: admire the setting and the train; the people are too remote.
* Photo 14: I am not getting anyone. The man in the hat must be the
driver. The closest to the camera may be Steve Martin.
* Photo 18: Lionel Rickard, Phil Rickard, Frank Stamford; I can't get
the fourth.
* Photo 19: John Prideaux. IIRC he was the treasurer who preceded me.

Clearly, now that council has decided on the format, I am inclining
towards making the selection cover the people who made LRRSA: those
who have faded from the scene, and those who are still with us, when
they were young adventurers discovering a world of light railways.

Not every member looks at this Yahoo group, but please ask as many as
possible to start looking, so that there is some chance of identifying
everybody in my photos.

Another Jack McLean navigation story. The people being trained at
Williamtown (Newcastle, NSW) always cheated, and navigated via the
railway lines. One day an aeroplane became hopelessly lost. The
signalman at Maitland had the points set for the other route.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: 50 years of LRRSA

Roderick Smith
 

Frank's proper coverage of the Les incident was appreciated: a half recollection is now converted to true history.
Les was surprisingly agile on that crutch. He hopped out at lineside photostops on mainline tours with the best; now nobody (let alone a movement-impaired person) is allowed to light mid section, even from carriages equipped with ground level stairwells. Only once that I can recall Les was unable to move clear of the main photo line in time.

In photo 17, the man in the hat must have been our Cheetham driver.

Today:
* Photo 11: admire the setting and the train; the people are too remote.
* Photo 14: I am not getting anyone. The man in the hat must be the driver. The closest to the camera may be Steve Martin.
* Photo 18: Lionel Rickard, Phil Rickard, Frank Stamford; I can't get the fourth.
* Photo 19: John Prideaux. IIRC he was the treasurer who preceded me.

Clearly, now that council has decided on the format, I am inclining towards making the selection cover the people who made LRRSA: those who have faded from the scene, and those who are still with us, when they were young adventurers discovering a world of light railways.

Not every member looks at this Yahoo group, but please ask as many as possible to start looking, so that there is some chance of identifying everybody in my photos.

Another Jack McLean navigation story. The people being trained at Williamtown (Newcastle, NSW) always cheated, and navigated via the railway lines. One day an aeroplane became hopelessly lost. The signalman at Maitland had the points set for the other route.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


A comment on 50 years

Iain
 

Rod Smiths mention of Jack Mclean brought to my mind several occasions where
representatives of the Victorian Railways or V/line were sent off to delve
into Jacks wonderful collection of railway plans and diagrams to extract
information about their own railway which they had incautiously thrown out
years before as being non-essential!



As I recall Jack claimed his success as a navigator in the RAAF was because
when the aircraft got lost and followed the directions to find a railway and
follow it Jack usually knew which one it was, even in Canada.



Regards



Dr Iain Stuart

Partner

JCIS Consultants

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