Date   

Kiama Locomotives Wheelbase [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Rod Hutchinson <r.hutchinson@...>
 

Hi all,

Would someone provide me with the wheel base of the following locomotives used at Kiama Quarry

Fowler 0-4-0T 16089 of 1923
Baldwin 0-4-0ST 41072/3 of 1914

Regards
Rod Hutchinson


Cuba

Roderick Smith
 

Cuba has been famous for its sugar railways, and lots of Australians have been there to photograph steam locos on three gauges (762 mm, 914 mm and 1435 mm).
The industry has been scaled back; many mills have been closed; few of the remaining ones use rail for cane field haulage, although many use rail from transfer stations, and many use rail for exporting product.
I have just placed two photos in a new Cuba album in the group's Photos section, showing two of five Russian diesels at 14 de Julio mill: a mill which is still working, and which uses 762 mm gauge track for cane transport.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: Walhalla to host a special guest - NA locomotive 7A

John Dimitrievich <johnd@...>
 

Dear Frank,



Is anyone keeping track of and photo documenting the move(s) between the
2 railways?



Happy Researching and Modelling,

Aim to Improve,

Prof Klyzlr


Walhalla to host a special guest - NA locomotive 7A

Frank Stamford
 

It has just been announced that as part of the centenary celebrations for the Walhalla railway, NA class locomotive No.7A will be visiting from the Puffing Billy Railway late in May.

Special trains will be running on the weekend of 29 and 30 May.

Details can be found at the Walhalla Goldfields Railway website:

http://www.walhallarail.com/site2/

7A first visited Walhalla in 1911, and made subsequent brief visits in 1928, and 1936 to replace G42 during overhauls of the latter. It went to Moe again in 1953 and ran the last train to Erica in 1954, when G42 failed.

Its visit this time will be even briefer, and it will only be running on one weekend I gather.

Regards,

Frank


Re: Institution of Civil Engineers - Virtual Library

Frank Stamford
 

Hello Greg,

Yes, that is probably correct.

It is certainly not based on the size of the
document, for example the following:

DISCUSSION. THE RELATIVE ADVANTAGES OF THE 5FT 6IN
GAUGE AND OF THE METRE GAUGE FOR THE STATE RAILWAYS
OF INDIA, AND PARTICULARLY FOR THOSE OF THE PUNJAB
(INCLUDING APPENDIX).
• Authors: W P ANDREW; T E HARRISON; J HAWKSHAW;
G P BIDDER; STRACHEY; G B BRUCE; C PIHL; C D FOX; G B
AIRY; H L SMITH; J ALLPORT; TYLER; C E SPOONER;
LORD LAWRENCE; J DANVERS; VIGNOLES; SANDBERG; R P
WILLIAMS; A M RENDELL; YOLLAND; T S ORMSBY; W F
ANDREW; W B LEWIS; G ALLAN; J T WOOD; G BERKELEY; K
P KENNEDY; J W GROVER; J T SMITH; W DENNIS; E
WOODS; E W YOUNG; G G HEPPEL; J GRIERSON; POLE; J e
TANNER; W T THORNTON; HAWKSLEY
• Source: Minutes of the Proceedings, Volume 35,
Issue 1873, pages 229 –468 , , E-ISSN: 1753-7843
is free, and has 240 pages.

I have not yet found the original article, as the
search criteria I used led me to the Discussion.
Nevertheless there is a lot of interesting
material in the Discussion which can help in
deciding whether the investment in the original
article is worthwhile. At the current exchange rate fifteen pounds is $A25.

Here is another interesting free item:




DISCUSSION. ON THE FESTINIOG RAILWAY FOR
PASSENGERS: AS A 2-FEET GAUGE, WITH SHARP
CURVES, AND WORKED BY LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES.



* Authors: H W TYLER; G W HEMANS; SIR C FOX;
P BRUFF; G W PHIPPS; GREGORY; R MALLET; SAVIN;
G P BIDDER; E WOODS; W B ADAMS; T E HARRISON; A
GILES; J J ALLPORT; Z COLBURN; J BRUNLEES; GALBRAITH; P BARLOW; G ENGLAND
* Source:
<http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/serial/imotp>Minutes
of the Proceedings, Volume 24, Issue 1865,
pages 367 –390 , , E-ISSN: 1753-7843
It can be found here:

http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/imotp.1865.23246

There is obviously an article (presumably for
fifteen pounds) which this Discussion refers to,
but again my search criteria lead to the
Discussion and not the original article.

Regards,

Frank




At 10:10 PM 21/04/2010, you wrote:


G'day Frank

Looking at the website it appears that they
charge for the original article eg
a.. RAILWAY WORK IN JAPAN (INCLUDING PLATE AT
BACK OF VOLUME) from Minutes of the Proceedings,
Volume 56, Issue 1879, pages 2 -14. This article is available for purchase.
DISCUSSION. RAILWAY WORK IN JAPAN. from Minutes
of the Proceedings, Volume 56, Issue 1879, pages
14 -23 is free content however it is a
discussion/comments/critism on the original
paper, typically from other Institution Members.
Whilst this is free, to understand the full
context of the comments you probably need the original article.

Hope this helps.

----- Original Message -----
From: fstamford
To: <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2010 9:11 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Institution of Civil Engineers - Virtual Library

It might be of interest to members of this Group
that the Institution of Civil Engineers (London,
UK) has digitised many of their publications, going back to 1836.

There is a good search facility, and many
articles are available for immediate download free of charge.

For some a charge of fifteen pounds is made.

I did a search and immeciately found six
documents of immediate interest to me dated
between 1852 and 1897. Only one had the 15 pound charge.

The website is:

<http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/journals>http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/journals

As an example of what is available free:

<http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/imotp.1879.22359>http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/imotp.1879.22359

This is titled: "Discussion on the best methods
of railway construction for the development of
new countries, as illustrated by the railway systems of South Australia".

I cannot work out the what their logic is in
selecting the articles for which a charge is
made. It could be somewhat random, to bring in
some income to help cover the cost of the site.

Regards,

Frank

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Institution of Civil Engineers - Virtual Library

Greg Stephenson <greg.stephenson@...>
 

G'day Frank

Looking at the website it appears that they charge for the original article eg
a.. RAILWAY WORK IN JAPAN (INCLUDING PLATE AT BACK OF VOLUME) from Minutes of the Proceedings, Volume 56, Issue 1879, pages 2 -14. This article is available for purchase.
DISCUSSION. RAILWAY WORK IN JAPAN. from Minutes of the Proceedings, Volume 56, Issue 1879, pages 14 -23 is free content however it is a discussion/comments/critism on the original paper, typically from other Institution Members. Whilst this is free, to understand the full context of the comments you probably need the original article.

Hope this helps.

----- Original Message -----
From: fstamford
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2010 9:11 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Institution of Civil Engineers - Virtual Library




It might be of interest to members of this Group that the Institution of Civil Engineers (London, UK) has digitised many of their publications, going back to 1836.

There is a good search facility, and many articles are available for immediate download free of charge.

For some a charge of fifteen pounds is made.

I did a search and immeciately found six documents of immediate interest to me dated between 1852 and 1897. Only one had the 15 pound charge.

The website is:

http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/journals

As an example of what is available free:

http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/imotp.1879.22359

This is titled: "Discussion on the best methods of railway construction for the development of new countries, as illustrated by the railway systems of South Australia".

I cannot work out the what their logic is in selecting the articles for which a charge is made. It could be somewhat random, to bring in some income to help cover the cost of the site.

Regards,

Frank


Institution of Civil Engineers - Virtual Library

Frank Stamford
 

It might be of interest to members of this Group that the Institution of Civil Engineers (London, UK) has digitised many of their publications, going back to 1836.

There is a good search facility, and many articles are available for immediate download free of charge.

For some a charge of fifteen pounds is made.

I did a search and immeciately found six documents of immediate interest to me dated between 1852 and 1897. Only one had the 15 pound charge.

The website is:

http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/journals

As an example of what is available free:

http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/imotp.1879.22359

This is titled: "Discussion on the best methods of railway construction for the development of new countries, as illustrated by the railway systems of South Australia".

I cannot work out the what their logic is in selecting the articles for which a charge is made. It could be somewhat random, to bring in some income to help cover the cost of the site.

Regards,

Frank


LRRSA Sydney Meeting, 28/4/2010, 19:30

LRRSA@...
 

Reminder from:   LRRSA Yahoo!7 Group
 
Title:   LRRSA Sydney Meeting
 
Date:   Wednesday 28 April 2010
Time:   19:30 - 22:30
Repeats:   This event repeats every other month on the last Wednesday until Friday 31 October 2014.
Location:   Woodstock Community Centre, Church Street, Burwood
 
Copyright � 2010  Yahoo!7 Pty Limited. All Rights Reserved | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy


Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

John Peterson
 

Hello all,

This is all very interesting. Most jetty lines ran along the jetty to shore only with maybe some sort of a shed at the end. Be interesting to know if the Rye line ran further inland in the early days to the lime kilms or the firewood places. Guess early maps might show and I wonder if early local newspapers are on line?

The firewood wagon looked quite substantial, a lot bigger than the ones I saw on the SA jetty lines.

Cheers
John P


________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au on behalf of thirtyinchfan
Sent: Mon 19/04/2010 3:31 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways





Hi all,

The Mornington Peninsula at the beginning of European settlement in the Port Phillip District was covered with she-oak forests which were used to provide Melbourne (and the lime kilns) with firewood. Lime was of course a prime requirement for settlement as well, being an essential building material. Before railways the bay would have been busy with boats moving goods around, and firewood and lime would have been important commodities.

The firewood industry changed the ecology of the Mornington Peninsula, the eucalypt dominated woodlands seen today are regrowth replacing the she-oak forests that were cut down.

Also I think it fair to say that pretty well every public jetty of any reasonable length in Victoria had a tramway with hand-pushed trolley at some point.

Cheers,

Michael J

ps thanks to all who attended yesterdays Southern Forest Narrow Gauge Meet, and helped make it a great day.





Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss, damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender, and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.


Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

Michael J
 

Hi all,

The Mornington Peninsula at the beginning of European settlement in the Port Phillip District was covered with she-oak forests which were used to provide Melbourne (and the lime kilns) with firewood. Lime was of course a prime requirement for settlement as well, being an essential building material. Before railways the bay would have been busy with boats moving goods around, and firewood and lime would have been important commodities.

The firewood industry changed the ecology of the Mornington Peninsula, the eucalypt dominated woodlands seen today are regrowth replacing the she-oak forests that were cut down.

Also I think it fair to say that pretty well every public jetty of any reasonable length in Victoria had a tramway with hand-pushed trolley at some point.

Cheers,

Michael J

ps thanks to all who attended yesterdays Southern Forest Narrow Gauge Meet, and helped make it a great day.


Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

David Axup
 

G'day John,





Thanks for the information. It seems the small trolley on the Rye Pier was
a lot older than I thought.



The lime traffic had well and truly finished when I moved to Rye with my
parents in 1946.



There were the remains of two lime kilns that I personally visited in the
'50s. One at Boneo with a small line accessing Port Phillip and it appears
on Ordnance Survey Maps of the 1920s and the remains of the right of way and
some wheels still there in the very early '50s. There is another out off
Browns Road which you can still access but I don't know if it had a rail
line.



I am not sure about the wood issue. That part of the Peninsula had large
coastal Banksia trees and was covered in Coastal T-tree neither of which I
would have thought would be any good for the lime industry.



There is a wreck off Rye pier of one of the small coastal vessels used to
transport the lime to Melbourne and Geelong. As kids we knew about it and
occasionally could see bits of what we thought were part of the wreck. I
have the name of it somewhere.



I can find no photos or further particulars of the Boneo Lime Kiln and line.



There are the remains of a lime kiln on the beach at Portsea.



Cheers,



David

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf
Of Peterson, John J
Sent: Saturday, 17 April 2010 10:40 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways





Hello all,

David; Re; Rye.The main photo shows a horse drawn wagon on the jetty with
small wood log loaded crosswise on the wagon sugar cane style. The caption
reads "Loading wood on Rye pier". Wood is being loaded from a boat onto the
wagon [or maybe the other way?]. The article says that the main early
industry of Rye was lime which was burnt in a number of kilms around Rye. So
the implication might be wood was brought in via boat and the railway and
bagged lime the other way. Might also mean that wood was exported but seems
an involved and expensive way to send firewood. It doesn't say when the lime
industry finished. In SA jetty lines the fishermen took over once the main
use of the jetty declined so maybe a similar pattern here.

Hard to tell gauge from the photos, particularly ones with no people in it
because of the light weight rail used.

Cheers
John

________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> on
behalf of David R Axup
Sent: Sat 17/04/2010 11:12 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

G'day John,

I grew up in Rye in the late 40's and through the 50's.

I cannot help with Dromana Pier or the Sorrento Tramway. Didn't go to
Dromana that often and the Sorrento Tramway was gone by the time we moved to
Rye in '46 after my father came out of the 2nd AIF.

The track on the Rye pier had one hand propelled trolley which was used by
the local fishermen [one of whom was my father] to move boxes of fish and
gear out to the two landings on the pier. There was also a shed on the
seaward end of the pier which the fishermen used to store gear and which was
locked. Obviously the local fishermen had keys. The trolley was also
chained and locked with access by the fishermen and Ports and Harbours
people and used to cart materials out to or from the shed. On at least one
occasion it was used to carry inert passengers back out to the end of the
pier for transfer to RIP after a heavy session in the Rye pub.

The shed was also occasionally used by the Ports and Harbours vessel RIP, an
ex-WW2 Corvette, for the storage of items.

Cheers,

David

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ]
On Behalf
Of John Cleverdon
Sent: Saturday, 17 April 2010 9:39 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
<mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

Hello all,
I wasn't able to get a copy of the issue with the Dromana and Rye piers,
and the Sorrento tramway (I'll check with the local historical society).

However, a newsagent at Mornington had a copy with the Westernport side
of the Peninsula, including photos from the Stony Point and Red Hill lines.

FYI, a book published by the local historical society (Dromana and
District Historical Society) - /A Dreamtime of Dromana/ - a few years
back has a few photos of the old (replaced 1950's) pier at Dromana,
showing the rails that ran along this pier. I think this was just a
manual/horse-powered trolley?
Looking at these photos, I'm also guessing that the gauge was wider than
3'6".

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/
<http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/>





Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received
in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using
attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss,
damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or
not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our
liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any
representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender,
and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Early Childhood
Development.


Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

John Peterson
 

Hello all,

David; Re; Rye.The main photo shows a horse drawn wagon on the jetty with small wood log loaded crosswise on the wagon sugar cane style. The caption reads "Loading wood on Rye pier". Wood is being loaded from a boat onto the wagon [or maybe the other way?]. The article says that the main early industry of Rye was lime which was burnt in a number of kilms around Rye. So the implication might be wood was brought in via boat and the railway and bagged lime the other way. Might also mean that wood was exported but seems an involved and expensive way to send firewood. It doesn't say when the lime industry finished. In SA jetty lines the fishermen took over once the main use of the jetty declined so maybe a similar pattern here.

Hard to tell gauge from the photos, particularly ones with no people in it because of the light weight rail used.

Cheers
John

________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au on behalf of David R Axup
Sent: Sat 17/04/2010 11:12 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: RE: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways




G'day John,

I grew up in Rye in the late 40's and through the 50's.

I cannot help with Dromana Pier or the Sorrento Tramway. Didn't go to
Dromana that often and the Sorrento Tramway was gone by the time we moved to
Rye in '46 after my father came out of the 2nd AIF.

The track on the Rye pier had one hand propelled trolley which was used by
the local fishermen [one of whom was my father] to move boxes of fish and
gear out to the two landings on the pier. There was also a shed on the
seaward end of the pier which the fishermen used to store gear and which was
locked. Obviously the local fishermen had keys. The trolley was also
chained and locked with access by the fishermen and Ports and Harbours
people and used to cart materials out to or from the shed. On at least one
occasion it was used to carry inert passengers back out to the end of the
pier for transfer to RIP after a heavy session in the Rye pub.

The shed was also occasionally used by the Ports and Harbours vessel RIP, an
ex-WW2 Corvette, for the storage of items.

Cheers,

David

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au> ] On Behalf
Of John Cleverdon
Sent: Saturday, 17 April 2010 9:39 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

Hello all,
I wasn't able to get a copy of the issue with the Dromana and Rye piers,
and the Sorrento tramway (I'll check with the local historical society).

However, a newsagent at Mornington had a copy with the Westernport side
of the Peninsula, including photos from the Stony Point and Red Hill lines.

FYI, a book published by the local historical society (Dromana and
District Historical Society) - /A Dreamtime of Dromana/ - a few years
back has a few photos of the old (replaced 1950's) pier at Dromana,
showing the rails that ran along this pier. I think this was just a
manual/horse-powered trolley?
Looking at these photos, I'm also guessing that the gauge was wider than
3'6".

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/ <http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/>









Important - This email and any attachments may be confidential. If received in error, please contact us and delete all copies. Before opening or using attachments check them for viruses and defects. Regardless of any loss, damage or consequence, whether caused by the negligence of the sender or not, resulting directly or indirectly from the use of any attached files our liability is limited to resupplying any affected attachments. Any representations or opinions expressed are those of the individual sender, and not necessarily those of the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.


Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

David Axup
 

G'day John,



I grew up in Rye in the late 40's and through the 50's.



I cannot help with Dromana Pier or the Sorrento Tramway. Didn't go to
Dromana that often and the Sorrento Tramway was gone by the time we moved to
Rye in '46 after my father came out of the 2nd AIF.



The track on the Rye pier had one hand propelled trolley which was used by
the local fishermen [one of whom was my father] to move boxes of fish and
gear out to the two landings on the pier. There was also a shed on the
seaward end of the pier which the fishermen used to store gear and which was
locked. Obviously the local fishermen had keys. The trolley was also
chained and locked with access by the fishermen and Ports and Harbours
people and used to cart materials out to or from the shed. On at least one
occasion it was used to carry inert passengers back out to the end of the
pier for transfer to RIP after a heavy session in the Rye pub.



The shed was also occasionally used by the Ports and Harbours vessel RIP, an
ex-WW2 Corvette, for the storage of items.



Cheers,



David

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf
Of John Cleverdon
Sent: Saturday, 17 April 2010 9:39 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Mornington Peninsular railways





Hello all,
I wasn't able to get a copy of the issue with the Dromana and Rye piers,
and the Sorrento tramway (I'll check with the local historical society).

However, a newsagent at Mornington had a copy with the Westernport side
of the Peninsula, including photos from the Stony Point and Red Hill lines.

FYI, a book published by the local historical society (Dromana and
District Historical Society) - /A Dreamtime of Dromana/ - a few years
back has a few photos of the old (replaced 1950's) pier at Dromana,
showing the rails that ran along this pier. I think this was just a
manual/horse-powered trolley?
Looking at these photos, I'm also guessing that the gauge was wider than
3'6".

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/


Re: Mornington Peninsular railways

John Cleverdon <johnc@...>
 

Hello all,
I wasn't able to get a copy of the issue with the Dromana and Rye piers,
and the Sorrento tramway (I'll check with the local historical society).

However, a newsagent at Mornington had a copy with the Westernport side
of the Peninsula, including photos from the Stony Point and Red Hill lines.

FYI, a book published by the local historical society (Dromana and
District Historical Society) - /A Dreamtime of Dromana/ - a few years
back has a few photos of the old (replaced 1950's) pier at Dromana,
showing the rails that ran along this pier. I think this was just a
manual/horse-powered trolley?
Looking at these photos, I'm also guessing that the gauge was wider than
3'6".

Regards,
John
--
John Cleverdon
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria
John's web page: http://users.cdi.com.au/~johnc/


Re: The Real Java Sugar Steam Loco Tour 2010

Roderick Smith
 

It is interesting that several Australians will be aboard this year: some will be from the railway hobby; some will be from the industrial-steam hobby.

I just reviewed my selection of 38 photos from the 2008 tour, still in an Indonesia album in the group's Photos section. I am amazed at the diversity (and antiquity) of the locos and the mill machinery. The same photos have been placed in an album in the Yahoo group Asian_LocoShed, which has four other albums of other railway aspects of Indonesia. John was unable to obtain time to cover the whole tour last time, and so is heading back to get the full coverage. I went for new territory, and have just got back from Cuba, where the sugar industry has been scaled down, and there is virtually no working steam. There are many museum/tourist steam operations, and we covered those. 17 years earlier, I was in Cuba covering the national lines, and out of season for the mills. There are two albums with the Yahoo group cubanrailways.

I don't know if either group is accessible to nonmembers: you will have to experiment to find out.

For Australians still wondering how to fit the coming tour in, you could fly into Jakarta and out of Surabaya, or into Jakarta and out of Bali, or get approval to go by taking the family to Bali and leaving them there for the duration.
Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

"John Browning" <ceo8@...> wrote:
...Quite a number of Australians are participating this time, and based on my previous trip, I am looking forward to an excellent experience...


The Real Java Sugar Steam Loco Tour 2010

John Browning
 

Please see the note below about this tour.

Quite a number of Australians are participating this time, and based on my
previous trip, I am looking forward to an excellent experience.

Steam and diesel action on narrow gauge cane lines plus some steam action on
3ft 6ins. Travel by air-conditioned minibus.


The Real Java Sugar Steam Loco Tour 2010
This tour will operate from Jakarta on 16 July through to Surabaya on 2
August with an optional post-tour extension getting back to Jakarta on 8
August. The trip will run in parallel with a tour to see the stationary
steam engines in the mills and there is flexibility to swap between both
tours. The tour is definitely 'go' but we now have more places available as
we are planning to book a 3rd bus to cope with the existing participants.
Details can be seen at:
<http://www.internationalsteam.co.uk/tours/java2010s.htm>
http://www.internationalsteam.co.uk/tours/java2010s.htm
Contact: John Raby jrabyATwaitrose.com or Rob Dickinson
internationalsteamATgooglemail.com (replace AT with @)

John Raby





John






logo



John Browning

PO Box 99

Annerley 4103

Queensland

Australia









Phone +61 (0)7 3255 9084

Mobile 0407 069 199


The Real Java Sugar Steam Loco Tour 2010

john_raby
 

The Real Java Sugar Steam Loco Tour 2010
This tour will operate from Jakarta on 16 July through to Surabaya on 2 August with an optional post-tour extension getting back to Jakarta on 8 August. The trip will run in parallel with a tour to see the stationary steam engines in the mills and there is flexibility to swap between both tours. The tour is definitely 'go' but we now have more places available as we are planning to book a 3rd bus to cope with the existing participants.
Details can be seen at: http://www.internationalsteam.co.uk/tours/java2010s.htm
Contact: John Raby jrabyATwaitrose.com or Rob Dickinson internationalsteamATgooglemail.com

John Raby


Re: Roaring Camp & Big Trees (CA, USA)

Roderick Smith
 

I have added the last of my 12 photos to the USA album, in the group's Photos section.
I have also added a brief video clip (with sound) to the Roderick Smith folio in the group's Files section.
As with two others there already, it is in cumbersome quicktime format, and is taken on a pocket camera, not proper digital video.
I don't have the software to convert clips to a better format.
Which format is preferred: .mpg, .avi or some sort of youtube format (and what is it)?
I don't take video clips often: only when the sight of the motion, or the sound, adds something to a simple still photo.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Re: Roaring Camp & Big Trees (CA, USA)

Roderick Smith
 

I have added the next four of the 12 photos (USA album, in the group's Photos section).
At Bear Mountain, a local recognised me as a railway enthusiast. He had been a regular volunteer worker for the railway. When the trip got back, he escorted me through the railway workshop, then drove me back to the bus via a longer route, through some of the scenic forest. Because of the numbers present that day, an extra trip had been added to the program at short notice.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor


Roaring Camp & Big Trees (CA, USA)

Roderick Smith
 

This is a purpose-built tourist line, in a state park, as part of a pioneer village showing timber-industry life in the 1880s.
The railway dates from the 1960s, and uses equipment brought in from former logging lines. It is 915 mm gauge.
See www.roaringcamp.com
and for a map www.roaringcamp.com/pdfs/mountain.pdf
The railway has two operating Shays, with another restorable; it has two Heislers (one may be operable, the other is being rebuilt); a small tank loco (used for Thomas days); and a Plymouth diesel (small, but noisy and gutsy).
There is also an sg link to the popular beach holiday resort Santa Cruz.
The ng runs all year; the sg runs only in summer.

I had great trouble getting information on getting there by public transport, but it is quite easy to reach.

From San Jose, Santa Clara transport runs buses about hourly to Santa Cruz, highway 17 express is the best: www.vta.org/
Some call by Scott Valley transit centre.
From Santa Cruz, the local bus operator (Santa Cruz Metro) runs every 30 min to Felton, via Scott Valley transit centre (routes 35 & 35A).
www.scmtd.com
Get out at Felton Fayre (Mt Hermon Rd at Graham Hill Rd): the entry to the park is 1 km up Graham Hill Rd, with a further 1 km in the park, through the carpark and past the workshops, to the village and passenger depot.

I arrived with plenty of margin for the 12.30 public train: and found an 11.00 charter to photograph. A former spiral bridge burnt out many years ago, and was replaced with a zig zag. The headshunts are restricted to eight vehicles and a loco; the train this day had ten vehicles, so the Plymouth diesel ran as a banker, and the train split to traverse the zigzag.

I have placed the first four of 12 photos in the USA album in the group's Photos section.

Regards,
Roderick B Smith
Rail News Victoria Editor

6661 - 6680 of 10249