Date   

Re: Egg ended boiler

Peter Evans
 

Well, I'm going to stick my neck out. It still looks like an air receiver to
me - http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Mt+Kembla+Boiler - Note the large pipe
on the top of the boiler, which in one of the detail photos can be seen
bolted directly to the shell of the vessel. If this was a steam boiler there
should be a cast-iron mounting riveted to the shell to take a stop valve.
Instead, this pipe looks rather like a delivery pipe from an air compressor.
Boilers are usually also bricked in and there is often evidence of corrosion
on the external parts of the shell where the bricks have been in contact
with the boiler, especially if the boiler has sat out of use for any length
of time. This vessel looks remarkably free of any such marks, which should
run lengthways along the shell starting about two-thirds of the way up, with
spaces between the corrosion marks to indicate the furnace gas passages.
(Air receivers are usually supported from below with three or more narrow
"U-shaped" pillars a little wider than the vessel itself - these also tend
to corrode and it would be interesting to see if there were any distinctive
transverse corrosion marks on the underside of the vessel).



In addition, there is no manhole anywhere on the top of the vessel, which
would have been a usual fitting to internally clean the vessel of sediment
if it was a boiler. Air receivers don't require manholes, only a small drain
for condensation on the bottom. I'm not doubting this vessel is old, the
pointed rivets shown in one of the detail photos are sometimes indicative of
the fact that the plates were carted into the mine separately and riveted
together by hand on the spot. The box on the end of the vessel has me
puzzled. I have never seen a fitting like this on any pressure vessel, and
certainly not on a steam boiler. It looks like a more modern addition to me,
and I would very much like to see what's inside and under it.



To my knowledge, no-one has published a history of boiler inspection laws in
NSW. (I would be delighted learn otherwise). At one point there would have
been a requirement to have pressure vessels (both air and steam) inspected.
This usually included stamping a number, date, test pressure and working
pressure on a visible part of the boiler. There are usually additional
stampings for subsequent inspections. If such stampings can be identified
anywhere on this pressure vessel, then a visit to NSW Public Records may
bear fruit with an inspection record indicating the type of pressure vessel
involved.



In the files section I have posted two Excel files (starting with the prefix
VPRS - you may have to fiddle with the column width to see all the data).
The BIA (Boiler Inspection Act) file indexes all the Victorian boiler
registrations likely to be of interest to Light Railway researchers. The
records run from 1906 to 1935. I did not index all 10,000 records for this
period because I was being paid by the Victorian Government to produce
heritage assessments of sawmill sites, so I included all the known
sawmillers and any industrial locomotive (in total only about 10% of the
extant records). The Victorian mining boiler records run only from 1927 to
about 1945 - these are apparently all that survive, although the government
inspection records should stretch back to 1897. All of the extant mining
boiler records have been indexed in this file. Both record series have been
the subject of articles in previous "Light Railways". It would be fantastic
if researchers in other States could perform a similar exercise.



I am aware that egg-ended boilers were used in Australia, but they were
rarer than more modern types of boilers. A careful re-examination of the
vessel at Mount Kembla, preferably by a qualified boiler attendant with a
good working knowledge of older types of pressure vessels, is going to be
the only way that this question is going to be settled once and for all.



Cheers,

PeterE.

.

Peter Evans

Production Management, Corporate Writing and Heritage Services

0407 537 837

www.peterevans.com.au <http://www.peterevans.com.au/>

peter@peterevans.com.au



P please consider the environment before printing.
This electronic mail contains information that is privileged and
confidential, intended only for use of the individual(s) or entity named. If
you are not the intended recipient, any dissemination, copying or use of the
information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission
in error please delete it immediately from your system and inform me by
return email and destroy the original message


Re: Egg ended boiler

David Halfpenny <dh16mm@...>
 

--------------------------------------------------
From: "oztrainz" <jkgaraty@1earth.net>
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 3:32 AM

and one from Scotland that found a second life as a water tank
<http://www.scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/search_item/index.php?service=RCAHMS&id=113263>
Many found use as locomotive water tanks in the UK.

David 1/2d


Re: Egg ended boiler

John Garaty
 

Hi Frank and all,
Some quick internet searching turned up the following links:
A photo of one as installed in the UK
<http://www.flickr.com/photos/bolou/3969208901/>

and a brief wiki at
<http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Egg-ended_boilers>

and one from Scotland that found a second life as a water tank
<http://www.scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/search_item/index.php?service=RCAHMS&id=113263>

My suspicion is that this boiler may have found a similar "second life" and this may be why this boiler is now in the middle of the paddock at Mount Kembla. This type of boiler may have been superceded by the early 1900's if it was in use at the mine.

Photos taken in 1902 of the pit-top after the Mount Kembla mine disaster show extensive damage to buildings near the mine entrance. These photos are also on the Wollongong Library website. One of the photos (Negative FM1/1316; FM2/105/3/3) shows what may be a boiler in the rubble.
<http://mylibrary.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PIC/BIBENQ/4833386/10989832,211?FMT=IMG>

Photos of the pit-top taken in 1906, after the Mount Kembla mine disaster, show a boiler house type structure with stack close to the mine entrance.
<http://mylibrary.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PIC/BIBENQ/4832277/10982632,2?FMT=IMG>
The 1906 boiler house in the photo above looks a "new build" after the disaster.

However Mount Kembla also had a kerosene shale processing plant somewhere nearby. One of the distillation pots from that plant is plinthed near the Community Hall at the top of Cordeaux Road, just below the main gate to the former AI&S Nebo (now BHP's Dendrobium) mine. For more on MT Kembla's oil shale history -
<http://www.michaelorgan.org.au/oilshale.htm>
and
<http://www.nswmin.com.au/Mining-in-NSW/History-of-Mining/Illawarra-Region/Mt-Kembla-/default.aspx>
gives the a hint to the location of the kerosense plant - "Also in 1946 the Nebo mine was established above the former shale workings at Mount Kembla." This kerosene shale plant at Mount Kembla may also have had boilers on its site.

On the light railways front, Mount Kembla was the last mine hand-worked mine in the Illawarra, with a 2' gauge cable-haulage bringing small (1-ton approx) skips to the surface until the mine's closure. One of these skips is preserved under the memorial arch at the Mount Kembla Miners Memorial at the Anglican Church in the village. These coal in these skips was dumped into larger standard-gauge wagons and lowered down the hill on an incline. The following photo (negative FM2/95/1/1A)shows one of the standard-gauge wagons on the incline in about 1912.
<http://mylibrary.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PIC/BIBENQ/4834850/10828927,45?FMT=IMG>

Another guess on my part that could put a surplus boiler at Mt Kembla is that sometime either before or after Mount Kembla's purchase by AI&S in 1945, the boilers at mine would have been made redundant by electric operation of the underground haulage and the incline. On the Illawarracoal website timeline, in 1925 furnace ventilation at Mount Kembla was replaced by a fan but there is no mention of whether this fan was electrically or mechanically powered. This would have been possible from the mid-1940's under AI&S when Nebo was established. AI&S mines had their own high-voltage powerlines from the steelworks powerhouse that provided power to the mines on the coast and the fans over the back of the escarpment.

Hoping all this is of interest, and that I haven't muddied the waters too much,
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "fstamford" <frank.stamford@...> wrote:


Hello all,

I have received the following request via the lrrsa's generic email address.

Can anyone help the enquirer?

Regards,

Frank

---------------------------------------------------

Date: 8/2/2010 22:06:51 +1100
From: Georgina Element <crella25@...>
To: <lrrsa@...>
Subject: Egg ended boiler
________________________________________

Hi there,

I'm in Mt Kembla NSW, near Wollongong, where we have an egg ended boiler that came from the Mt Kembla Coal mine originally, but is now in a horse paddock. I was told by Graham Clegg from the Powerhouse Museum a couple of years ago, that you have conducted a lot of reserach into mines in Australia. I was wondering if you could point me in the right dirrection to find out more about this boiler: where it came from, how it was made and used...

It is made of three iron plates to achieve the diameter of the boiler. There are pictures of it on Fickr if you serach Mt Kembla Boiler. See link below:
http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Mt+Kembla+Boiler

I've been searching on the internet for information on egg-ended boilers, but I have found out very little really.

Thank you for your time.

Kind regards,

Georgina Element


Re: Egg ended boiler

John Shoebridge
 

My pennyworth re Egg-ended Boilers

They were quite common in NSW coal mines until around 1890. Indeed I can recall seeing a bank of them still in place (but not in use) at Minmi when I was very young.

They were very inefficient (but who cares when there was plenty of unsaleable small coal to hand) and as someone has remarked, prone to heat impingement on the bottom of the shell.

Otherwise they were easily managed, readily repaired and had excellent thermal reserve capacity to handle varying steam demand. There are pictures of them in use at several Newcastle collieries on the Hunter Photobank.

Being made from wrought iron with a minimum of internal stays or gussets, they made excellent water tanks

There was (last time I looked) one still used as a tank at a ready-mix concrete plant near Newcastle. I have suggested to several groups that it be listed for preservation but no one seems interested in such a mundane (and large) item.

From the photos I feel the one near Mt Kembla was a boiler (note the location of the suspension brackets) I trust it will long survive.

Regards
John

----- Original Message -----
From: fstamford
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2010 7:59 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Egg ended boiler




Hello all,

I have received the following request via the lrrsa's generic email address.

Can anyone help the enquirer?

Regards,

Frank

---------------------------------------------------

Date: 8/2/2010 22:06:51 +1100
From: Georgina Element <crella25@hotmail.com>
To: <lrrsa@lrrsa.org.au>
Subject: Egg ended boiler
________________________________________

Hi there,

I'm in Mt Kembla NSW, near Wollongong, where we have an egg ended boiler that came from the Mt Kembla Coal mine originally, but is now in a horse paddock. I was told by Graham Clegg from the Powerhouse Museum a couple of years ago, that you have conducted a lot of reserach into mines in Australia. I was wondering if you could point me in the right dirrection to find out more about this boiler: where it came from, how it was made and used...

It is made of three iron plates to achieve the diameter of the boiler. There are pictures of it on Fickr if you serach Mt Kembla Boiler. See link below:
http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Mt+Kembla+Boiler

I've been searching on the internet for information on egg-ended boilers, but I have found out very little really.

Thank you for your time.

Kind regards,

Georgina Element


Re: Egg ended boiler

Peter Evans
 

The key is the presence or absence of any way of determining the water level
in the boiler. If there are no places to put a water gauge, it is an air
compressor receiver. (Compressed air in mines was introduced into Australia
I think in the late 1860s). Air receivers were commonly converted from old
boilers (a Babcock & Wilcox "Wrought-Iron-Front" steam and water drum was a
favourite choice), so even this test is not conclusive. And air receivers do
have safety valves too. My money is very heavily on a purpose-built air
receiver (on account of the non-flanged ends) but I would actually have to
see it to make sure.



Egg-ended boilers are very ancient devices. The Cornish boiler was invented
by Richard Trevithick in 1812, and quickly supplanted the egg-ended boiler
and its close cousin, the elephant boiler. The big problem with egg-ended
boilers was their lack of efficiency and the fact that the hottest gases
impinged on the part of the boiler where there was potentially the greatest
deposition of sediment. Mistaking air receivers for boilers is more common
than you may think - even in reputable journals like "Australasian
Historical Archaeology" published by ASHA. One has to laugh when confronted
by a proud archaeologist standing next to a "wood-fired steam engine" (yes,
that was actually the caption!) when its ever so clearly an air receiver!



Peter Evans

Production Management, Corporate Writing and Heritage Services

0407 537 837

www.peterevans.com.au <http://www.peterevans.com.au/>

peter@peterevans.com.au



P please consider the environment before printing.
This electronic mail contains information that is privileged and
confidential, intended only for use of the individual(s) or entity named. If
you are not the intended recipient, any dissemination, copying or use of the
information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission
in error please delete it immediately from your system and inform me by
return email and destroy the original message


Re: Lithgow

BM
 

It is indeed a nice photo of Lithgow's industrial heritage. Anyone who wants a good print of this image can find it on page 66 of the LRRSA book 'Furnace, Fire & Forge: Lithgow's iron and steel industry 1874-1932'.
Bob McKillop

----- Original Message -----
From: John Browning
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:34 AM
Subject: [LRRSA] Lithgow



This has gone to the Industrial Railway Society group overnight and
stimulated some excitement. I am sure there are many lrrsa group members who
will also appreciate it.

A wonderful photo taken from a glass plate negative.

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/4307834608/>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/4307834608/

Click on 'All sizes" and then have a look at the Original Size image.

You can download it if you want.

Taken at the early industrial centre of Lithgow, NSW.

Zoom in and look between the brick chimneys centre.

You might be interested to see what is to be seen partially obscured there -
but the whole photo is full of fascinating detail.

An IRS member quickly identified the loco as a Neilson 'box tank', so it
must be Neilson 394 or 395 of 1857, shown at the Eskdale Ironworks, Lithgow,
after 1880.

There are quite a number of other images of very interesting industrials in
this collection, many of a similar quality, taken by Ralph Snowball.

Here's a few tasters to get you started - but you'll need to look hard to
find them all. New images are still being scanned and added.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3306862951

http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3307690622

http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3722303637

Enjoy

John

logo

John Browning

PO Box 99

Annerley 4103

Queensland

Australia

Phone +61 (0)7 3255 9084

Mobile 0407 069 199


Lithgow

John Browning
 

This has gone to the Industrial Railway Society group overnight and
stimulated some excitement. I am sure there are many lrrsa group members who
will also appreciate it.



A wonderful photo taken from a glass plate negative.

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/4307834608/>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/4307834608/



Click on 'All sizes" and then have a look at the Original Size image.

You can download it if you want.



Taken at the early industrial centre of Lithgow, NSW.

Zoom in and look between the brick chimneys centre.

You might be interested to see what is to be seen partially obscured there -
but the whole photo is full of fascinating detail.



An IRS member quickly identified the loco as a Neilson 'box tank', so it
must be Neilson 394 or 395 of 1857, shown at the Eskdale Ironworks, Lithgow,
after 1880.



There are quite a number of other images of very interesting industrials in
this collection, many of a similar quality, taken by Ralph Snowball.

Here's a few tasters to get you started - but you'll need to look hard to
find them all. New images are still being scanned and added.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3306862951



http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3307690622



http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3722303637



Enjoy



John






logo



John Browning

PO Box 99

Annerley 4103

Queensland

Australia









Phone +61 (0)7 3255 9084

Mobile 0407 069 199


Egg ended boilers

John Shoebridge
 

Re Egg-Ended boilers..
These were quite common in NSW coal mines prior to about 1890.

They make excellent water tanks in that they are made from wrought iron and have no internal stays or gusset.

There is (or was last time I looked ) one still inn use near Newcastle as a water tanks at a ready mix concrete plant.

They were very inefficient (but with plenty of refuse slack coal who cared ?) and simple to operate and repair.They also had high thermal reserve capacity. (ie plenty of boiling water stored ready to flash into steam )

Several photos showing them in use at Newcastle mines (eg Co Operative and Greta Collieries) can be found in the Hunter Photobank and Newcastle University collections.

As to the maker or original owner of the one near Mt Kembla ... that is anyone's guess... interesting to hear it has survived.

Regards
John


Re: Egg ended boiler

Stephen Percy Larcombe
 

John, I think you are wrong. There is such a thing as an "egg ended boiler".



This boiler looks pretty much exactly like what they should look like.



The book "Historic Steam Boiler Explosions" by Alan McEwen has a write up on a bank of these boilers exploding at a blast furnace.



The boilers were described as 64 feet long, externally fired (hence no fire tubes or furnace tube(s)). They were fired on blast furnace gas. They ran at about 54 psi (if my memory is correct). Boiler number 5 failed, the resulting release of steam and movement of the boiler upset the brick piers that the other boilers were mounted on, and resulted in a chain reaction, that caused a total of 12 boilers to explode.



These boilers all had single rivetted lap seems. The pictures in the book match the online pictures. Remember also, that this explosion occured in the 1880's when the boilers were somthing like 30 years old. So do not expect too many modern safety fittings. That also gives plenty of time for the boilers to have found a second use after the steam generation part of thier life has finished.



Yours



Stephen Larcombe


Re: Egg ended boiler

John Garaty
 

Hi Frank,
It looks more like an air receiver or airtank for the mine or some other associated plant. It looks like both ends are domed and there are no fireholes, flues or gauge glass fittings apparent in the photos.

Such a tank or tanks could be used as a "buffer" to enure that there was a sufficient supply of pressurised air for the operation of pneumatic drills etc underground at the end of airline from the surface.

There appears to be 2 similar elevated tanks in the foreground at Corrimal here:
<http://mylibrary.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/PIC/BIBENQ/4821076/10828326,9?FMT=IMG>

I bow to other mining/power enginneers and miners who may have knowledge of the operation of such equipment.
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra
Just down the road from Mt Kembla

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "fstamford" <frank.stamford@...> wrote:


Hello all,

I have received the following request via the lrrsa's generic email address.

Can anyone help the enquirer?

Regards,

Frank

---------------------------------------------------

Date: 8/2/2010 22:06:51 +1100
From: Georgina Element <crella25@...>
To: <lrrsa@...>
Subject: Egg ended boiler
________________________________________

Hi there,

I'm in Mt Kembla NSW, near Wollongong, where we have an egg ended boiler that came from the Mt Kembla Coal mine originally, but is now in a horse paddock. I was told by Graham Clegg from the Powerhouse Museum a couple of years ago, that you have conducted a lot of reserach into mines in Australia. I was wondering if you could point me in the right dirrection to find out more about this boiler: where it came from, how it was made and used...

It is made of three iron plates to achieve the diameter of the boiler. There are pictures of it on Fickr if you serach Mt Kembla Boiler. See link below:
http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Mt+Kembla+Boiler

I've been searching on the internet for information on egg-ended boilers, but I have found out very little really.

Thank you for your time.

Kind regards,

Georgina Element


Egg ended boiler

Frank Stamford
 

Hello all,

I have received the following request via the lrrsa's generic email address.

Can anyone help the enquirer?

Regards,

Frank

---------------------------------------------------

Date: 8/2/2010 22:06:51 +1100
From: Georgina Element <crella25@hotmail.com>
To: <lrrsa@lrrsa.org.au>
Subject: Egg ended boiler
________________________________________

Hi there,

I'm in Mt Kembla NSW, near Wollongong, where we have an egg ended boiler that came from the Mt Kembla Coal mine originally, but is now in a horse paddock. I was told by Graham Clegg from the Powerhouse Museum a couple of years ago, that you have conducted a lot of reserach into mines in Australia. I was wondering if you could point me in the right dirrection to find out more about this boiler: where it came from, how it was made and used...

It is made of three iron plates to achieve the diameter of the boiler. There are pictures of it on Fickr if you serach Mt Kembla Boiler. See link below:
http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Mt+Kembla+Boiler

I've been searching on the internet for information on egg-ended boilers, but I have found out very little really.

Thank you for your time.

Kind regards,

Georgina Element


Re: LRRSA February 2010 meetings

Alf Aiken
 

I think that we should be thanking Frank & the other members who help to get Light Railways out as they do. This is the first time that I can remember since I have been a member that it has been late.

I know from other organisations that I am involved in that everyone expects the committee to perform but no one wants to volunteer to be on those committees.

Keep up the good work.

Alf

Not really. Our present schedule is perfectly achievable by any well
organised printer using modern technology. We have not changed the
schedule in 12 years, and it normally works.

The current debacle was caused by the printer moving premises and
being over optimistic in how quickly they could get up and running
again. That should not happen again. However if our current printer
cannot reliably meet schedules we will change printer.

We have been told to expect "Light Railways" 211 to be delivered to
us tomorrow. We cannot get a mailing team together until Friday 12
Feb, so LR211 should go into the mail system on Monday 15 Feb, and be
in the hands of most members by Friday 19 Feb.

Regards,

Frank


Re: LRRSA February 2010 meetings

Frank Stamford
 

At 09:46 PM 7/02/2010, Jim Longworth wrote:


Hi guys

Can the printer be given more time for printing, by bringing forward the date for giving copy material to the printer?

:) Jim

Not really. Our present schedule is perfectly achievable by any well organised printer using modern technology. We have not changed the schedule in 12 years, and it normally works.

The current debacle was caused by the printer moving premises and being over optimistic in how quickly they could get up and running again. That should not happen again. However if our current printer cannot reliably meet schedules we will change printer.

We have been told to expect "Light Railways" 211 to be delivered to us tomorrow. We cannot get a mailing team together until Friday 12 Feb, so LR211 should go into the mail system on Monday 15 Feb, and be in the hands of most members by Friday 19 Feb.

Regards,

Frank









--- In <mailto:LRRSA%40yahoogroups.com.au>LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "fstamford" <frank.stamford@...> wrote:


"Light Railways" No.211 is running late and is not expected to be
posted until early next week.

For that reason the details of our February meetings are given below.

The LRRSA website has also been updated with details of LR211.

As there have been problems with several recent issues of Light
Railways we will be reviewing the printing arrangements for it. The printer we are currently using is capable of producing very high quality work at a very good price, but unfortunately the repeated failure to meet deadlines is causing us problems.

Anyway, LR211 is worth waiting for I think, perhaps one of the
best issues to date.

Regards,

Frank




ADELAIDE: "The Otway Ranges, Autumn 1959"
Photos taken during a day spent in the Otway Ranges in Autumn
1959 will be presented, and members are also invited to make contributions on any topic of light railway interest.
Location: 150 First Avenue, Royston Park.
Date: Thursday 4 February at 8.00pm.
Contact Arnold Lockyer on (08) 8296 9488.

BRISBANE: ``Moreton Mill Movies"
To start the New Year Bob Gough will show movies taken around the
Nambour area, which have recently been converted to DVD format.
Location: BCC Library, Garden City
Shopping Centre, Mount Gravatt. After hours entrance (rear of
library) opposite Mega Theatre complex, next to Toys'R'Us.
Date: Friday 12 February at 7.30pm. Entry from 7pm.

MELBOURNE: "Light and Industrial Railways"
Weston Langford will give a presentation depicting light and
industrial railways and relics with examples from all Australian States.
Location: Ashburton Uniting Church Hall, Ashburn Grove, Ashburton.
Date: Thursday, 11 February at 8.00pm

SYDNEY: "New Zealand Bush Tramways + Narrow Gauge on U-Tube."
Mic Thomas will first be presenting a video on New Zealand Bush
Tramways, then he will follow by showing a varied and sometimes fascinating selection of narrow gauge railway video clips taken off U-Tube.
Location: Woodstock Community Centre, Church Street, Burwood,
(five minutes walk from Burwood railway station).
Date: Wednesday 24 February at 7.30pm


Re: LRRSA February 2010 meetings

longworthjim
 

Hi guys

Can the printer be given more time for printing, by bringing forward the date for giving copy material to the printer?

:) Jim

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "fstamford" <frank.stamford@...> wrote:


"Light Railways" No.211 is running late and is not expected to be posted until early next week.

For that reason the details of our February meetings are given below.

The LRRSA website has also been updated with details of LR211.

As there have been problems with several recent issues of Light Railways we will be reviewing the printing arrangements for it. The printer we are currently using is capable of producing very high quality work at a very good price, but unfortunately the repeated failure to meet deadlines is causing us problems.

Anyway, LR211 is worth waiting for I think, perhaps one of the best issues to date.

Regards,

Frank




ADELAIDE: "The Otway Ranges, Autumn 1959"
Photos taken during a day spent in the Otway Ranges in Autumn 1959 will be presented, and members are also invited to make contributions on any topic of light railway interest.
Location: 150 First Avenue, Royston Park.
Date: Thursday 4 February at 8.00pm.
Contact Arnold Lockyer on (08) 8296 9488.

BRISBANE: ``Moreton Mill Movies"
To start the New Year Bob Gough will show movies taken around the Nambour area, which have recently been converted to DVD format.
Location: BCC Library, Garden City
Shopping Centre, Mount Gravatt. After hours entrance (rear of library) opposite Mega Theatre complex, next to Toys'R'Us.
Date: Friday 12 February at 7.30pm. Entry from 7pm.

MELBOURNE: "Light and Industrial Railways"
Weston Langford will give a presentation depicting light and industrial railways and relics with examples from all Australian States.
Location: Ashburton Uniting Church Hall, Ashburn Grove, Ashburton.
Date: Thursday, 11 February at 8.00pm

SYDNEY: "New Zealand Bush Tramways + Narrow Gauge on U-Tube."
Mic Thomas will first be presenting a video on New Zealand Bush Tramways, then he will follow by showing a varied and sometimes fascinating selection of narrow gauge railway video clips taken off U-Tube.
Location: Woodstock Community Centre, Church Street, Burwood, (five minutes walk from Burwood railway station).
Date: Wednesday 24 February at 7.30pm


LRRSA Brisbane Meeting, 12/2/2010, 19:30

LRRSA@...
 

Reminder from:   LRRSA Yahoo!7 Group
 
Title:   LRRSA Brisbane Meeting
 
Date:   Friday 12 February 2010
Time:   19:30 - 22:00
Repeats:   This event repeats every other month on the second Friday.
Location:   BCC Library, Garden City Shopping Centre, Mount Gravatt, after hours entrance, (rear of library) opposite Mega Theatre Complex, next to Toys R Us
 
Copyright � 2010  Yahoo!7 Pty Limited. All Rights Reserved | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy


Re: "Light Railways" February 2010 issue

Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...>
 

gould_scott wrote:

If the mailout goes as planned, the magazine is posted at the end of
the month, giving almost one weeks notice for Adelaide members, and
two weeks notice for Melbourne members. I think that's a reasonable
amount of notification of what's happening at the society's REGULAR
entertainment meetings.
But we have been told that many people come long distances from outside the city if they find the topic attractive. That seems very short notice for such people.


if you would like to join in with the mailouts, there could be room
found for you to help with the almost 700 copies that are sent out
bi-monthly,
scarcely practicable when the mailout is in Melbourne.

or if you can offer any constructive input on when you
believe the mailout should occur, the council would be happy to
recieve your comments.
I have already said that I believe the notices should be in the previous issue, which would completely remove any necessary nexus between the mailout dates and the meeting dates, as well as giving country and interstate members much more time to decide/plan re attending interesting meetings.


Re: "Light Railways" February 2010 issue

gould_scott <sncs@...>
 

Eddie,

If the mailout goes as planned, the magazine is posted at the end of the month, giving almost one weeks notice for Adelaide members, and two weeks notice for Melbourne members. I think that's a reasonable amount of notification of what's happening at the society's REGULAR entertainment meetings. Rember, it's the subject matter and presenter thats changing, not the location or when the meeting occurs. I'm sure if you would like to join in with the mailouts, there could be room found for you to help with the almost 700 copies that are sent out bi-monthly, or if you can offer any constructive input on when you believe the mailout should occur, the council would be happy to recieve your comments.

Regards,

Scott Gould

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...> wrote:

Bill Hanks wrote:

It is important for LR to be delivered on time, for members who rely
on receiving it, in order to know what presentation is to be given at
the next entertainment meeting and what date it will be. Believe it
or not, there is a surprisingly large number of LRRSA members who do
not use computers and they need the receive the magazine on time.
There are also the other members who have the meeting date for
Melbourne (the Second Thursday of every Second Month, imprint in
their minds) and will turn up regardless of their LR arriving in the
mail. Some members will travel long distances to a meeting if there
is presentation being given that interests them.
So surely they deserve longer notice than is now provided even when the
magazine does run to the schedule that Frank acknowledges we don't even
know about anyway?


LRRSA Melbourne Meeting , 11/2/2010, 20:00

LRRSA@...
 

Reminder from:   LRRSA Yahoo!7 Group
 
Title:   LRRSA Melbourne Meeting
 
Date:   Thursday 11 February 2010
Time:   20:00 - 22:30
Repeats:   This event repeats every other month on the second Thursday.
Location:   Ashburton Uniting Church Hall, Ashburn Grove, Ashburton
 
Copyright � 2010  Yahoo!7 Pty Limited. All Rights Reserved | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy


Re: "Light Railways" February 2010 issue

Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...>
 

Bill Hanks wrote:

It is important for LR to be delivered on time, for members who rely
on receiving it, in order to know what presentation is to be given at
the next entertainment meeting and what date it will be. Believe it
or not, there is a surprisingly large number of LRRSA members who do
not use computers and they need the receive the magazine on time.
There are also the other members who have the meeting date for
Melbourne (the Second Thursday of every Second Month, imprint in
their minds) and will turn up regardless of their LR arriving in the
mail. Some members will travel long distances to a meeting if there
is presentation being given that interests them.
So surely they deserve longer notice than is now provided even when the magazine does run to the schedule that Frank acknowledges we don't even know about anyway?


Re: "Light Railways" February 2010 issue

bll_hnks
 

Dear All,

It is important for LR to be delivered on time, for members who rely on receiving it, in order to know what presentation is to be given at the next entertainment meeting and what date it will be. Believe it or not, there is a surprisingly large number of LRRSA members who do not use computers and they need the receive the magazine on time. There are also the other members who have the meeting date for Melbourne (the Second Thursday of every Second Month, imprint in their minds) and will turn up regardless of their LR arriving in the mail. Some members will travel long distances to a meeting if there is presentation being given that interests them.

At the Council meeting last night, a special mail out of meeting notices was made for Melbourne and Brisbane members who most likely will not receive Light Railways before their next local meetings.

The Council also believe that punctuality is a courtesy and that our members deserve on time delivery of 'Light Railways'.

Regards,

W.L. (Bill) Hanks
President LRRSA



From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On Behalf Of Hunslet
Sent: Thursday, 4 February 2010 10:21 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: "Light Railways" February 2010 issue



fstamford wrote:
As there have been problems with several recent issues of Light
Railways we will be reviewing the printing arrangements for it. The
printer we are currently using is capable of producing very high
quality work at a very good price, but unfortunately the repeated
failure to meet deadlines is causing us problems.
to which Eddie Oliver responded:
Apart from the meeting notifications, are there really any adverse
consequences of "late" arrivals? Does anyone run the risk of heart
palpitations if LR does not appear in their letterbox when they expect
it? I confess I have no such expectations and therefore certainly don't
have unfilled expectations.

I support Eddie in his response. I am fully aware of the many
specialist publications such as "Light Railways" that are prepared by
extremely dedicated volunteers. Accordingly, I have no problems
with "late" arrivals ... something has to be extremely late for me to
even notice its non-arrival on time! I am more than happy with the
quality of the production of "Light Railways" - for which the
production staff (and the printers!) are to be congratulated. By
all means, express and discuss your concerns with the printer, but IF
your "only" beef is that it is a week or two late - DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT!

Those who know me a little closer will be aware that I also produce a
"niche" publication and on-time running is certainly not my forte,
with sometimes up to six months between issues rather than an
anticipated two months. The subscribers and casual readers are all
aware that the preparation etc is all voluntary and so don't jump up
and down if an issue is 30 minutes behind time. I am lucky (?!) to
receive one or two queries a year, and these are more along the line
of "has my sub. expired?" rather than a tirade of complaints. Other
the past ten years since publication became irregular, subs renewals
has been extremely high, with only one person not renewing and giving
as is reason, the irregular publication. (He did not offer to assist!!!)

Hunslet.

6901 - 6920 of 10238