Date   

Re: Aerial Ropeway - Flying Fox.

Chris Stratton
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dick Holland" <rholland@rspcansw.org.au>
To: <LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au>
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2006 8:46 AM
Subject: [LRRSA] Aerial Ropeway - Flying Fox.



Greetings.

I too have been a member of LRRSA for many years, however, only several days ago did I become aware of this group.

I believe a flying fox to be a cable suspended between two points only, with a load bearing device being suspended from a pulley that can be drawn to and fro.

An aerial ropeway is a continuous ropeway that is suspended from gantries and goes out on one cable and comes back on the other. Does this make sense?

In N.S.W. the only operating aerial ropeway still operating is at the Kandos Cement Works (or it was 12 months ago), there have been others of course, here in Broken Hill on Block 10 after the ground creep (not a person) caused a processing mill to almost fall over and had to be relocated. A ropeway was seen as the best option to move ore. There was another one of some distance used in the construction of the Warragamba Dam, but it was closed down probably 40 or so years ago. There were a few more in the vicinity of Kandos and used for the conveyance of limestone to a cement works at a place called Charbon, since closed.

I know this subject may be a bit out of order, however, these things were used in industry for a long time before the advent of the conveyer belt and road hauled dumpers. So I'll apologise in advance.

Dick Holland
Broken Hill
There was also one at Douglas Park in NSW, across the Nepean River gorge. It was used for the construction of the Cordeaux Dam. There was a standard gauge siding on the north side and a 2 foot gauge tramway from the southern side to the dam. Earthworks for the tramway can still be seen in places but road widening and re-alignment has obliterated a lot of it.
Regards,
CS


Re: Dookie to KatamatiteTramway

B.Rumary
 

All this talk of The Shire makes me wonder if these tramways were
operated by Hobbits!

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk


Re: Aerial Ropeway - Flying Fox.

Michael J
 

Dick Holland wrote:

Greetings.

I too have been a member of LRRSA for many years, however, only several days ago did I become aware of this group.

I believe a flying fox to be a cable suspended between two points only, with a load bearing device being suspended from a pulley that can be drawn to and fro.

An aerial ropeway is a continuous ropeway that is suspended from gantries and goes out on one cable and comes back on the other. Does this make sense?
Depending on what part of the world you are in, chairlift and gondola systems are often refered to as tramways or ropeways.

Michael


Re: Aerial Ropeway - Flying Fox.

Bill
 

Hi Dick,

Sincere thanks for the prompt and detailed answer.

We were entranced by the Wolgan Valley in the late 70's early 80's, and also visited Glen Davis [and the Katoomba Scenic Rwy].

More recently the Firewood Tramways of Walhalla had us wanting to visit all the sites mentioned ... needed a glossary for some of the "jargon". You have solved one of the mysteries.

Regards,
Bill

Dick Holland <rholland@rspcansw.org.au> wrote:
Greetings.

I too have been a member of LRRSA for many years, however, only several days ago did I become aware of this group.

I believe a flying fox to be a cable suspended between two points only, with a load bearing device being suspended from a pulley that can be drawn to and fro.

An aerial ropeway is a continuous ropeway that is suspended from gantries and goes out on one cable and comes back on the other. Does this make sense?

In N.S.W. the only operating aerial ropeway still operating is at the Kandos Cement Works (or it was 12 months ago), there have been others of course, here in Broken Hill on Block 10 after the ground creep (not a person) caused a processing mill to almost fall over and had to be relocated. A ropeway was seen as the best option to move ore. There was another one of some distance used in the construction of the Warragamba Dam, but it was closed down probably 40 or so years ago. There were a few more in the vicinity of Kandos and used for the conveyance of limestone to a cement works at a place called Charbon, since closed.

I know this subject may be a bit out of order, however, these things were used in industry for a long time before the advent of the conveyer belt and road hauled dumpers. So I'll apologise in advance.

Dick Holland
Broken Hill
____________________________________________
Richard Holland

Regional Inspector
Far West - Broken Hill

rholland@rspcansw.org.au
Mobile : 0427 010 184
www.rspcansw.org.au




---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo!7 Time Capsule - Make your mark and be a part of history


Re: Koondrook Tramway

Alf Aiken
 

Phil

Thank you for your detailed reply. I also obtained the relevant
articles from the ARHS. They make interesting reading. The track
arrangement at Koondrook are certainly interesting. This would have
made for interesting shunting. With all the info that has been
uncovered it would be nice to see an article in Light Railways. I
don't think that I would be able to do this as this was my first
visit to Koondrook & I don't know when I will return. I think that
photos of the remaining infrastucture would complement any such
article.

Alf

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Phil Rickard"
<chy_gwel_an_meneth@y...> wrote:

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Alf Atkin" <pollux1au@h...>
wrote:

Couple more questions:

1. What method of safeworking was used?

2. Was there any intermediate sidings? I know that there were
at
least three wayside stations.

3. Did the tramway have its own sidings at Kerang or did it use
the
VR sidings?

Alf
I have found a copy of both the 1948 and 1971 Bulletin articles,
together with one from Newsrail Aug 1983. In addition to Frank's
detailed response of the 22nd the following may be of interest:

1. The only signal was a VR Home signal protecting Kerang yard.
(The
"one engine in steam" being the norm.)

2. In 1948 or thereabouts, Koondrook Stock Yards had a dead-end,
converted to a loop, at some stage. Gannawarra "seems" to have had
a
siding but it had gone, Hinkson's had a loop siding, as did
Yeoburn.
On the outskirts of Kerang four private sidings had connections to
the
tramway, all being recent additions. It is not stated which
industries they served.

3. At Kerang, the shire trains used the VR yard and station. They
had
no yard of their own. Koondrook was the tramway headquarters and
any
examination of the line needs to be looked at with Koondrook as the
focus. Traffic came from up and down the river, from over the
River
via Barham and was shipped out on the tramway. Kerang was just the
exchange point with the VR.

Re ex VR No.34; ex G&M "Titania" -
Readers may wish to view
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/railways/image.aspx?ID=878
for a picture of No.34 at the Kerang Waterworks tower in
Wellington St
Kerang. The brick water tower (which is still standing) is
situated
over one km from the railway, on the west side of town. The
Koondrook
tram went to the east of Kerang.
The Bulletin No.132 of Oct 1948 says the loco was used at the
waterworks, presumably for pumping. Can anyone venture how it was
transported from Kerang station, a mile away, to the water tower,
and
how long was it used there. Was it only used at the waterworks
following the arrival of "Federal" in 1895? Comments invited.

An interesting article on the Koondrook-Barham bridge may be found
on
the John Monash web site at
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aholgate/jm/nonrcbrs/koondrook_maj.html
The role of the tram to carry the materials is covered as Monash
was
concerned that it might not be up to the task, and correspondence
with
Rattray, the Shire's tramway manager resulted.

The role of the bridge in channeling trade towards Barham and
Koondrook and hence over the tramway is briefly examined.

Koondrook yard. Bulletin 132 has a sketch of the interesting track
layout at Koondrook. Does anyone have a copy of Weston Langford's
sketch that would be in his station diagram book pub by ARHS Vic a
few
years back? I'd like to compare the two. (Does anyone have a VR
station diagram of Koondrook - just hoping . . )

cheers Phil


Aerial Ropeway - Flying Fox.

Dick Holland <rholland@...>
 

Greetings.

I too have been a member of LRRSA for many years, however, only several days ago did I become aware of this group.

I believe a flying fox to be a cable suspended between two points only, with a load bearing device being suspended from a pulley that can be drawn to and fro.

An aerial ropeway is a continuous ropeway that is suspended from gantries and goes out on one cable and comes back on the other. Does this make sense?

In N.S.W. the only operating aerial ropeway still operating is at the Kandos Cement Works (or it was 12 months ago), there have been others of course, here in Broken Hill on Block 10 after the ground creep (not a person) caused a processing mill to almost fall over and had to be relocated. A ropeway was seen as the best option to move ore. There was another one of some distance used in the construction of the Warragamba Dam, but it was closed down probably 40 or so years ago. There were a few more in the vicinity of Kandos and used for the conveyance of limestone to a cement works at a place called Charbon, since closed.

I know this subject may be a bit out of order, however, these things were used in industry for a long time before the advent of the conveyer belt and road hauled dumpers. So I'll apologise in advance.

Dick Holland
Broken Hill
____________________________________________
Richard Holland

Regional Inspector
Far West - Broken Hill

rholland@rspcansw.org.au
Mobile : 0427 010 184
www.rspcansw.org.au


Re: Dookie to KatamatiteTramway

bll_hnks
 

Not Hobbits, but Bunyips maybe!

________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Brian Rumary
Sent: Friday, 27 October 2006 9:07 AM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Dookie to KatamatiteTramway



All this talk of The Shire makes me wonder if these tramways were
operated by Hobbits!

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk


Re: Bangor and the WHR

BM
 

I should have made explicit that I was quoting from the museum's brochure on this claim. Whatever the semantics of the wording, the museum is worth a visit.

Bob McKillop

---- Brian Rumary <brian@rumary.co.uk> wrote:

Rfmckillop wrote:

What will appeal to members of this group is the fact that the
stables house the only museum in Britain devoted to industrial
railways.
I'm afraid this is just not true - there are a lot of museums devoted
to industrial railways in the UK, although Penrhyn is probably the only
one housed totally indoors. Other industrial railway museums are the
Leighton Buzzard Light Railway, Tanfield, Rutland Ironstone Museum,
Amberley, Foxfield, etc.

Brian Rumary, England

www.rumary.co.uk





Material posted on this group may be adapted by the editors of LRRSA publications for use in those publications, including Light Railways and the LRRSA web-site www.lrrsa.org.au

This group is for members who share common interests with the members of the LRRSA, but the contents of postings are those of their authors and opinions expressed do not necessarily conform with those of any LRRSA member nor of the LRRSA Council of Management"

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Proposed LRRSA tour to Erica-Walhalla

Bill
 

Hi Peter,

I have just joined this forum, though have been a member of LRRSA for
a number of years.

I read with interest of the proposed tour, as my wife and I have
visited this area a couple of times in the past five years, and have
gained a reasonable library in the area, including the excellent book
on Firewood Tramways.

I was wondering if I could gain access to a copy of your itinerary, so
we can enrich our next visit. We are unable to come East at present.

ps Is there a difference between an aerial ropeway and a flying fox?

Many thanks,
Bill
in SA

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "sawdustoz" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Hi All,

I am proposing a tour to Erica/Walhalla on the weekend of 18/19
November 2006. The proposed tour itinerary would be:

Saturday Morning: Timber Tramway Tramp at Tyers Junction
Saturday Afternoon: Coopers Creek Copper mine and lime kilns.
Saturday night: Rawson with a possible entertainment item
Sunday morning: Train Thomson to Walhalla, Long Tunnel mine visit and
return via firewood tramway to Thomson.
Sunday afternoon: Kirchhubels tramway south of Erica.

How does everyone feel about the itinerary and the dates? (I am
somewhat constrained by the need to be at Alexandra on the second and
third Sundays). Does anyone know of any other rail activities planned
for this weekend (steam tours / special runs etc.)?

I plan to have a flyer for the October mail-out of LR with mention of
the tour in that issue for those who buy it at the newsagents.

Cheers,
Sawdustoz
(PeterE)


Re: Koondrook Tramway

Phil Rickard <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, John Dennis <jdennis@o...> wrote:

Weston Langford's book does cover the Koondrook line - the sketches
are dated 2-9-58.

I guess I could scan this if you would prefer to see the drawing,
rather than my verbose description. (I guess I could also fish out
the later Bulletin article myself, if I felt so inclined, and compare
the two diagrams....)

John

Thanks John, Interesting descriptions, I would say!

Yes, would you be able to scan your diagram/s and add it to the folder
I've created in "Photos" labelled "Maps and Diagrams" ?
http://au.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/LRRSA/photos/browse/7f12

That would be great if you could, thank you.

I've been reading the ARHS Divisional Diary (forerunner of Newsrail)
from inception and the Koondrook line gets fairly regular mention.
One interesting snippet dated Sept 1958 states:
"The Kerang-Koondrook line is still laid with iron rails (instead of
steel) in 22ft lengths."

Do readers know of any other lines around Australia that were still
using iron rails in the 1950's? (and was the Koondrook ever re-laid
in steel . . . or did it still have the same rails when it closed in
1977/8/9/80 . . . when did it close!)

cheers Phil


Re: Richards winch,Starvation creek, Powelltown

John Dennis <jdennis@...>
 

What did you find, when you went in?

John

On Thu, 26 Oct 2006 10:14:03 -0000, "dave.malady"
<maladydave@hotmail.com> wrote:

Has anyone been into Richards steam winch near Powelltown since the
area has been logged. I went in recently to check if everything was
still there.
==========================================================
John Dennis jdennis@optusnet.com.au
Melbourne,Australia Home of the HOn30 Dutton Bay Tramway
and the Australian Narrow Gauge Web-Exhibition Gallery
Dutton Bay URL: http://members.optusnet.com.au/duttonbay
WebX http://members.optusnet.com.au/jdennis/ng_webex.html


Richards winch,Starvation creek, Powelltown

dave.malady
 

Has anyone been into Richards steam winch near Powelltown since the
area has been logged. I went in recently to check if everything was
still there.


Re: Koondrook Tramway

John Dennis <jdennis@...>
 

Weston Langford's book does cover the Koondrook line - the sketches
are dated 2-9-58.

It shows four sidings on the up side of the line, half a mile from
Kerang, with one on the down side, all facing Koondrook, with the
annotation "Oil Sidings - All main line points Weighted (Well type)
with hand-locking bar".

There was a dismantled loop siding at Yeoburn, and an extant loop
serving a stock race at Hinksons. Another dismantled siding was at
Gannawarra, and a very long loop siding named Sleeper Siding, which
served a pair of stock races.

Koondrook itself had a loop at the goods shed and platform (with signs
between the end of the platform and the down end loop siding stating
"Engines Must Not go between these Boards". The line terminated at a
Timber Mill. The wharf siding kicked back off the loop, with a loop
siding, the wharf being on the river side, and another goods shed on
the other track. A dismantled dead-end siding is shown coming off
this loop siding, at the far end to the station. Also kicking back
off the "main line" loop was a siding to a turntable.

I guess I could scan this if you would prefer to see the drawing,
rather than my verbose description. (I guess I could also fish out
the later Bulletin article myself, if I felt so inclined, and compare
the two diagrams....)

John

On Wed, 25 Oct 2006 12:52:46 -0000, "Phil Rickard"
<chy_gwel_an_meneth@yahoo.com.au> wrote:

2. In 1948 or thereabouts, Koondrook Stock Yards had a dead-end,
converted to a loop, at some stage. Gannawarra "seems" to have had a
siding but it had gone, Hinkson's had a loop siding, as did Yeoburn.
On the outskirts of Kerang four private sidings had connections to the
tramway, all being recent additions. It is not stated which
industries they served.
[snip]
Koondrook yard. Bulletin 132 has a sketch of the interesting track
layout at Koondrook. Does anyone have a copy of Weston Langford's
sketch that would be in his station diagram book pub by ARHS Vic a few
years back? I'd like to compare the two. (Does anyone have a VR
station diagram of Koondrook - just hoping . . )
==========================================================
John Dennis jdennis@optusnet.com.au
Melbourne,Australia Home of the HOn30 Dutton Bay Tramway
and the Australian Narrow Gauge Web-Exhibition Gallery
Dutton Bay URL: http://members.optusnet.com.au/duttonbay
WebX http://members.optusnet.com.au/jdennis/ng_webex.html


Re: Newcastle Trams

Jeff Mullier
 

Iain,

I know of two books that cover the tram system of Newcastle etc.

"Tramways of Newcastle", by David Keenan, Ken McCarthy & Ross Willson, 138p, hardcover, published 1999 Transit Press, ISBN 0909338 1 59

"Maitland Tramway Ventures", By R.Willson & K.McCarthy, 79p, softcover, published 1965 South Pacific Electric Railway Society

Hope this helps

Regards
Jeff Mullier

----- Original Message -----
From: Iain Stuart
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 12:37 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Newcastle Trams


Is there a standard reference work on the steam and electric tramways of
Newcastle and suburbs?



I tried a search on Libraries Australia without any result.



I would be grateful if anyone can point me in the right direction especially
to sources of plans of tramway infrastructure.



yours



Dr Iain Stuart

JCIS Consultants



P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North



ph/fx (02) 97010191


Re: Dookie to KatamatiteTramway

bll_hnks
 

Thanks for the info.

Those dates loosely tie in with the bought and sold dates for the loco.

A colleague of mine was saying that the buildings on this line were
different to other VR buildings of the time.

Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Frank Stamford
Sent: Thursday, 26 October 2006 4:53 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Dookie to KatamatiteTramway



The Dookie - Katamatite Tramway was built by the Yarrawonga Shire and
opened about the same time as the Koondrook tramway - circa 1889.
However, unlike the Koondrook tramway, it did not remain in Shire
ownership for very long, and was taken over by the VR in December
1892. Hence it did not have time to become eccentric and therefore
very interesting, unlike the Koondrook tramway.

Ex VR loco No.12 was the only loco the Shire owned. It was built as a
2-2-2, but rebuilt by the VR as a 2-4-0 before it came to the
Katamatite tramway.

Regards,

Frank



--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@r...> wrote:

A lot of information is coming out of the woodwork about the Kerang to
Koondrook tramway.

There was another similar shire tramway.

I'm currently reviewing the book Visions of the Victorian Railways by
Gerald Dee. It talks about VR loco No 12 of 1859 being sold to the
Yarrawonga Shire in 1890 for use on the Dookie to Katamatite Tramway
and
bought back by the VR in 1893 becoming No 528.

Can anyone enlighten us further about this shire tramway operation?



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Phil Rickard
Sent: Wednesday, 25 October 2006 10:53 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Koondrook Tramway



--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Alf Atkin" <pollux1au@h...> wrote:

Couple more questions:

1. What method of safeworking was used?

2. Was there any intermediate sidings? I know that there were at
least three wayside stations.

3. Did the tramway have its own sidings at Kerang or did it use the
VR sidings?

Alf
I have found a copy of both the 1948 and 1971 Bulletin articles,
together with one from Newsrail Aug 1983. In addition to Frank's
detailed response of the 22nd the following may be of interest:

1. The only signal was a VR Home signal protecting Kerang yard. (The
"one engine in steam" being the norm.)

2. In 1948 or thereabouts, Koondrook Stock Yards had a dead-end,
converted to a loop, at some stage. Gannawarra "seems" to have had a
siding but it had gone, Hinkson's had a loop siding, as did Yeoburn.
On the outskirts of Kerang four private sidings had connections to the
tramway, all being recent additions. It is not stated which
industries they served.

3. At Kerang, the shire trains used the VR yard and station. They had
no yard of their own. Koondrook was the tramway headquarters and any
examination of the line needs to be looked at with Koondrook as the
focus. Traffic came from up and down the river, from over the River
via Barham and was shipped out on the tramway. Kerang was just the
exchange point with the VR.

Re ex VR No.34; ex G&M "Titania" -
Readers may wish to view
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/railways/image.aspx?ID=878
for a picture of No.34 at the Kerang Waterworks tower in Wellington St
Kerang. The brick water tower (which is still standing) is situated
over one km from the railway, on the west side of town. The Koondrook
tram went to the east of Kerang.
The Bulletin No.132 of Oct 1948 says the loco was used at the
waterworks, presumably for pumping. Can anyone venture how it was
transported from Kerang station, a mile away, to the water tower, and
how long was it used there. Was it only used at the waterworks
following the arrival of "Federal" in 1895? Comments invited.

An interesting article on the Koondrook-Barham bridge may be found on
the John Monash web site at
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aholgate/jm/nonrcbrs/koondrook_maj.html
The role of the tram to carry the materials is covered as Monash was
concerned that it might not be up to the task, and correspondence with
Rattray, the Shire's tramway manager resulted.

The role of the bridge in channeling trade towards Barham and
Koondrook and hence over the tramway is briefly examined.

Koondrook yard. Bulletin 132 has a sketch of the interesting track
layout at Koondrook. Does anyone have a copy of Weston Langford's
sketch that would be in his station diagram book pub by ARHS Vic a few
years back? I'd like to compare the two. (Does anyone have a VR
station diagram of Koondrook - just hoping . . )

cheers Phil









Re: Dookie to KatamatiteTramway

Frank Stamford
 

The Dookie - Katamatite Tramway was built by the Yarrawonga Shire and
opened about the same time as the Koondrook tramway - circa 1889.
However, unlike the Koondrook tramway, it did not remain in Shire
ownership for very long, and was taken over by the VR in December
1892. Hence it did not have time to become eccentric and therefore
very interesting, unlike the Koondrook tramway.

Ex VR loco No.12 was the only loco the Shire owned. It was built as a
2-2-2, but rebuilt by the VR as a 2-4-0 before it came to the
Katamatite tramway.

Regards,

Frank

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Bill Hanks" <bhanks@r...> wrote:

A lot of information is coming out of the woodwork about the Kerang to
Koondrook tramway.

There was another similar shire tramway.

I'm currently reviewing the book Visions of the Victorian Railways by
Gerald Dee. It talks about VR loco No 12 of 1859 being sold to the
Yarrawonga Shire in 1890 for use on the Dookie to Katamatite Tramway and
bought back by the VR in 1893 becoming No 528.

Can anyone enlighten us further about this shire tramway operation?



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Phil Rickard
Sent: Wednesday, 25 October 2006 10:53 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Koondrook Tramway



--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Alf Atkin" <pollux1au@h...> wrote:

Couple more questions:

1. What method of safeworking was used?

2. Was there any intermediate sidings? I know that there were at
least three wayside stations.

3. Did the tramway have its own sidings at Kerang or did it use the
VR sidings?

Alf
I have found a copy of both the 1948 and 1971 Bulletin articles,
together with one from Newsrail Aug 1983. In addition to Frank's
detailed response of the 22nd the following may be of interest:

1. The only signal was a VR Home signal protecting Kerang yard. (The
"one engine in steam" being the norm.)

2. In 1948 or thereabouts, Koondrook Stock Yards had a dead-end,
converted to a loop, at some stage. Gannawarra "seems" to have had a
siding but it had gone, Hinkson's had a loop siding, as did Yeoburn.
On the outskirts of Kerang four private sidings had connections to the
tramway, all being recent additions. It is not stated which
industries they served.

3. At Kerang, the shire trains used the VR yard and station. They had
no yard of their own. Koondrook was the tramway headquarters and any
examination of the line needs to be looked at with Koondrook as the
focus. Traffic came from up and down the river, from over the River
via Barham and was shipped out on the tramway. Kerang was just the
exchange point with the VR.

Re ex VR No.34; ex G&M "Titania" -
Readers may wish to view
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/railways/image.aspx?ID=878
for a picture of No.34 at the Kerang Waterworks tower in Wellington St
Kerang. The brick water tower (which is still standing) is situated
over one km from the railway, on the west side of town. The Koondrook
tram went to the east of Kerang.
The Bulletin No.132 of Oct 1948 says the loco was used at the
waterworks, presumably for pumping. Can anyone venture how it was
transported from Kerang station, a mile away, to the water tower, and
how long was it used there. Was it only used at the waterworks
following the arrival of "Federal" in 1895? Comments invited.

An interesting article on the Koondrook-Barham bridge may be found on
the John Monash web site at
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aholgate/jm/nonrcbrs/koondrook_maj.html
The role of the tram to carry the materials is covered as Monash was
concerned that it might not be up to the task, and correspondence with
Rattray, the Shire's tramway manager resulted.

The role of the bridge in channeling trade towards Barham and
Koondrook and hence over the tramway is briefly examined.

Koondrook yard. Bulletin 132 has a sketch of the interesting track
layout at Koondrook. Does anyone have a copy of Weston Langford's
sketch that would be in his station diagram book pub by ARHS Vic a few
years back? I'd like to compare the two. (Does anyone have a VR
station diagram of Koondrook - just hoping . . )

cheers Phil







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Newcastle Trams

Eddie Oliver <eoliver@...>
 

Iain Stuart wrote:
Is there a standard reference work on the steam and electric tramways of
Newcastle and suburbs?
Tramways of Newcastle by Keenan/McCarthy/Wilson, Transit Press 1999.


Newcastle Trams

Iain
 

Is there a standard reference work on the steam and electric tramways of
Newcastle and suburbs?



I tried a search on Libraries Australia without any result.



I would be grateful if anyone can point me in the right direction especially
to sources of plans of tramway infrastructure.



yours



Dr Iain Stuart

JCIS Consultants



P.O. Box 2397

Burwood North



ph/fx (02) 97010191



HYPERLINK "mailto:iain@jcis.net.au"iain@jcis.net.au

HYPERLINK "mailto:iain_stuart@optusnet.com.au"iain_stuart@optusnet.com.au



Check out the website at HYPERLINK "http://www.jcis.net.au"www.jcis.net.au






--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.408 / Virus Database: 268.13.11/497 - Release Date: 25/10/2006


Dookie to KatamatiteTramway

bll_hnks
 

A lot of information is coming out of the woodwork about the Kerang to
Koondrook tramway.

There was another similar shire tramway.

I'm currently reviewing the book Visions of the Victorian Railways by
Gerald Dee. It talks about VR loco No 12 of 1859 being sold to the
Yarrawonga Shire in 1890 for use on the Dookie to Katamatite Tramway and
bought back by the VR in 1893 becoming No 528.

Can anyone enlighten us further about this shire tramway operation?



Regards,

Bill Hanks



________________________________

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Phil Rickard
Sent: Wednesday, 25 October 2006 10:53 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Koondrook Tramway



--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Alf Atkin" <pollux1au@h...> wrote:

Couple more questions:

1. What method of safeworking was used?

2. Was there any intermediate sidings? I know that there were at
least three wayside stations.

3. Did the tramway have its own sidings at Kerang or did it use the
VR sidings?

Alf
I have found a copy of both the 1948 and 1971 Bulletin articles,
together with one from Newsrail Aug 1983. In addition to Frank's
detailed response of the 22nd the following may be of interest:

1. The only signal was a VR Home signal protecting Kerang yard. (The
"one engine in steam" being the norm.)

2. In 1948 or thereabouts, Koondrook Stock Yards had a dead-end,
converted to a loop, at some stage. Gannawarra "seems" to have had a
siding but it had gone, Hinkson's had a loop siding, as did Yeoburn.
On the outskirts of Kerang four private sidings had connections to the
tramway, all being recent additions. It is not stated which
industries they served.

3. At Kerang, the shire trains used the VR yard and station. They had
no yard of their own. Koondrook was the tramway headquarters and any
examination of the line needs to be looked at with Koondrook as the
focus. Traffic came from up and down the river, from over the River
via Barham and was shipped out on the tramway. Kerang was just the
exchange point with the VR.

Re ex VR No.34; ex G&M "Titania" -
Readers may wish to view
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/railways/image.aspx?ID=878
for a picture of No.34 at the Kerang Waterworks tower in Wellington St
Kerang. The brick water tower (which is still standing) is situated
over one km from the railway, on the west side of town. The Koondrook
tram went to the east of Kerang.
The Bulletin No.132 of Oct 1948 says the loco was used at the
waterworks, presumably for pumping. Can anyone venture how it was
transported from Kerang station, a mile away, to the water tower, and
how long was it used there. Was it only used at the waterworks
following the arrival of "Federal" in 1895? Comments invited.

An interesting article on the Koondrook-Barham bridge may be found on
the John Monash web site at
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aholgate/jm/nonrcbrs/koondrook_maj.html
The role of the tram to carry the materials is covered as Monash was
concerned that it might not be up to the task, and correspondence with
Rattray, the Shire's tramway manager resulted.

The role of the bridge in channeling trade towards Barham and
Koondrook and hence over the tramway is briefly examined.

Koondrook yard. Bulletin 132 has a sketch of the interesting track
layout at Koondrook. Does anyone have a copy of Weston Langford's
sketch that would be in his station diagram book pub by ARHS Vic a few
years back? I'd like to compare the two. (Does anyone have a VR
station diagram of Koondrook - just hoping . . )

cheers Phil


Re: Koondrook Tramway

Phil Rickard <chy_gwel_an_meneth@...>
 

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Alf Atkin" <pollux1au@h...> wrote:

Couple more questions:

1. What method of safeworking was used?

2. Was there any intermediate sidings? I know that there were at
least three wayside stations.

3. Did the tramway have its own sidings at Kerang or did it use the
VR sidings?

Alf
I have found a copy of both the 1948 and 1971 Bulletin articles,
together with one from Newsrail Aug 1983. In addition to Frank's
detailed response of the 22nd the following may be of interest:

1. The only signal was a VR Home signal protecting Kerang yard. (The
"one engine in steam" being the norm.)

2. In 1948 or thereabouts, Koondrook Stock Yards had a dead-end,
converted to a loop, at some stage. Gannawarra "seems" to have had a
siding but it had gone, Hinkson's had a loop siding, as did Yeoburn.
On the outskirts of Kerang four private sidings had connections to the
tramway, all being recent additions. It is not stated which
industries they served.

3. At Kerang, the shire trains used the VR yard and station. They had
no yard of their own. Koondrook was the tramway headquarters and any
examination of the line needs to be looked at with Koondrook as the
focus. Traffic came from up and down the river, from over the River
via Barham and was shipped out on the tramway. Kerang was just the
exchange point with the VR.

Re ex VR No.34; ex G&M "Titania" -
Readers may wish to view
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/railways/image.aspx?ID=878
for a picture of No.34 at the Kerang Waterworks tower in Wellington St
Kerang. The brick water tower (which is still standing) is situated
over one km from the railway, on the west side of town. The Koondrook
tram went to the east of Kerang.
The Bulletin No.132 of Oct 1948 says the loco was used at the
waterworks, presumably for pumping. Can anyone venture how it was
transported from Kerang station, a mile away, to the water tower, and
how long was it used there. Was it only used at the waterworks
following the arrival of "Federal" in 1895? Comments invited.

An interesting article on the Koondrook-Barham bridge may be found on
the John Monash web site at
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~aholgate/jm/nonrcbrs/koondrook_maj.html
The role of the tram to carry the materials is covered as Monash was
concerned that it might not be up to the task, and correspondence with
Rattray, the Shire's tramway manager resulted.

The role of the bridge in channeling trade towards Barham and
Koondrook and hence over the tramway is briefly examined.

Koondrook yard. Bulletin 132 has a sketch of the interesting track
layout at Koondrook. Does anyone have a copy of Weston Langford's
sketch that would be in his station diagram book pub by ARHS Vic a few
years back? I'd like to compare the two. (Does anyone have a VR
station diagram of Koondrook - just hoping . . )

cheers Phil

9961 - 9980 of 10266