Date   

Re: Heatherlie quarry (Vic.)

Geoff
 

Not sure about the State Library, but the stone for Parliament house came from north of our border:
https://www.theage.com.au/national/monument-still-damns-bad-choices-20061229-ge3vwh.html


Re: Heatherlie quarry (Vic.)

Frank Stamford
 

I do not understand some of the dates in this article! It implies the quarry was not operating until the 1870s and then only for buildings in Stawell. But Parliament House and the state library were built in the 1850s.
Frank

On 6 Apr 2022, at 20:28, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:

Roderick Smith

I traced VR and the quarry with an ARHS group in about 1970.

Dec 1 2021 Heatherlie Quarry: The ugly, abandoned hole that created Melbourne Brian Johnston Heatherlie Quarry near the Grampians was the source of stone for many of Melbourne's most important buildings. Photo: Chris O'Connell Melbourne's grandest buildings were shovelled out of a hole in the ground. Obviously, of course, if you've ever thought about it. But who thinks much about where building material comes from? Not travellers. Travellers admire buildings already constructed, or attractively ruined. We care much less about how they were born.

You can visit the womb of Melbourne, though. You can see the spot where all those gracious turrets, pompous pillars and civic curlicues of the town hall and state library came from. Their raw materials. The dusty and violent process by which they came into being, and the humble origins of the city's boastful architecture.

That place is Heatherlie Quarry, deep in rural Victoria on the northeast edge of the Grampians National Park. If you ever visit this region – and with the Grampians' dramatic peaks, waterfalls and wildflowers why wouldn't you – then you should certainly drop by this overlooked remnant of industrial heritage. This hole in the ground might not be worth a journey in itself, but is certainly worth a detour.

Abandoned mining equipment can still be seen at the quarry. Photo: Chris O'Connell From the carpark on Mt Zero Road a flat, easy track leads through bushland for just over a kilometre to the historic site. Soon you'll come across a gigantic old boiler that lies amid crackle-dry grasses and brittle drifts of gum leaves like the body of a wounded brontosaurus.

Nearby is the skeleton of an old crane, as well as winches that resemble the claws of a velociraptor, rusting cogwheels and the rails of a tramway line.

The dinosaur comparisons come easy thanks to the giant size of the abandoned machines and the way they point to a lumbering, less refined past. Industrial sites are rarely preserved, but here quarrying methods are showcased, along with the sweaty efforts that European settlers faced in sourcing natural resources from remote areas.

Early Victoria had to import its sandstone. Then in the mid-1860s a stone mason called Francis Watkins was hunting at Mt Difficult when he spotted the region's high-quality, durable rock.

He took out a lease on the land and by the 1870s was supplying gold-rush town Stawell with stone for its courthouse, Anglican and Catholic churches, town hall and tombstones. By 1882 a tramway connected Stawell with the quarry.

A visiting parliamentary party was so taken with Stawell's courthouse that it decided Parliament House should be built of the same material. Heatherlie's sandstone had excellent grain, texture and colour. It was weather resistant but easy to work. By 1880, its blocks were being hoisted onto Parliament House.

The quarry would go on to supply stone for Melbourne's town hall, state library, GPO, Regent Theatre and Port Authority Building, among others. And so stone from the ugly-duckling site of this little bush quarry was transformed into some elegant architectural swans.

Much of what you see at Heatherlie Quarry dates from its 1890s heyday, when it employed a hundred workers. After the Second World War the quarry began to peter out, and its stone was used mainly for the repair of existing buildings.

You can rummage around the entrails of machines, tanks for storing compressed air and rust-red tramway trolleys. Orchids and wildflowers create a dainty contrast to the steampunk leftovers.

The GPO in Bourke Street Mall is now a shopping arcade. Photo: Josie Withers Several partially renovated cottages were once home to Italian immigrant workers though most quarrymen camped or commuted from Stawell or Fyans Creek.

All this is explained by useful signage, which also displays photographs of the quarry in action.

One picture shows workers in waistcoats and jackets standing in front of a locomotive that belches steam like a dragon. Another captures quarrymen stripped down to shirts and braces as they swing hammers and load railway trolleys.

The State Library of Victoria. Photo: Roberto Seba In the early days, explosives were used to blast the stone out of the hillside; you can see the pits in the earth were the explosives were stored. This rambunctious approach to quarrying was soon abandoned, as it wasted too much stone.

The stone would later be separated along fracture lines by use of wedges and plugs, an ancient technique used since the time the Egyptians were building their pyramids.

You can still see the drill lines on the rock face, and the blocks of stone tumbled at its foot like a set of dice shaken by a giant. A glimpse of Melbourne's messy birth, you might say, frozen in time, but not quite entirely forgotten.

STAY The basic Plantation Campground near Heatherlie Quarry is run by Parks Victoria and has spaces for caravans, trailers and tents. Halls Gap, 15 kilometres south, has abundant accommodation options. See visithallsgap.com.au VISIT Heatherlie Quarry Heritage Site is in Grampians National Park, a three-hour drive northwest of Melbourne. See parks.vic.gov.au <www.traveller.com.au/heatherlie-quarry-the-ugly-abandoned-hole-that-created-melbourne-h202a0>

[Nearly 20 years ago, one party wanted to complete Parliament House to its original plans, and reactivate the quarry to do so. One of the quangos vetoed that, on environmental grounds; sacred-site vetoes hadn't yet emerged.]

"211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-d.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-c.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-b.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-a.jpg"







<211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-d.jpg>
<211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-c.jpg>
<211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-b.jpg>
<211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-a.jpg>


Re: Heatherlie quarry (Vic.)

rthorne475
 

Roderick,

A fascination report, thank you. You refer to a photo showing a steam locomotive.  Is that correct, or was it a portable steam engine or even a traction engine, as I understood the line to be horse-worked?  Or was it a VR loco at the connection?  What is the gauge of the surviving wagons?

Regards,

Richard Horne

On Wednesday, 6 April 2022, 11:28:07 BST, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor@...> wrote:


Roderick Smith

I traced VR and the quarry with an ARHS group in about 1970.

Dec 1 2021 Heatherlie Quarry: The ugly, abandoned hole that created Melbourne  Brian Johnston Heatherlie Quarry near the Grampians was the source of stone for many of Melbourne's most important buildings. Photo: Chris O'Connell Melbourne's grandest buildings were shovelled out of a hole in the ground. Obviously, of course, if you've ever thought about it. But who thinks much about where building material comes from? Not travellers. Travellers admire buildings already constructed, or attractively ruined. We care much less about how they were born.

You can visit the womb of Melbourne, though. You can see the spot where all those gracious turrets, pompous pillars and civic curlicues of the town hall and state library came from. Their raw materials. The dusty and violent process by which they came into being, and the humble origins of the city's boastful architecture.

That place is Heatherlie Quarry, deep in rural Victoria on the northeast edge of the Grampians National Park. If you ever visit this region – and with the Grampians' dramatic peaks, waterfalls and wildflowers why wouldn't you – then you should certainly drop by this overlooked remnant of industrial heritage. This hole in the ground might not be worth a journey in itself, but is certainly worth a detour.

Abandoned mining equipment can still be seen at the quarry.  Photo: Chris O'Connell From the carpark on Mt Zero Road a flat, easy track leads through bushland for just over a kilometre to the historic site. Soon you'll come across a gigantic old boiler that lies amid crackle-dry grasses and brittle drifts of gum leaves like the body of a wounded brontosaurus.

Nearby is the skeleton of an old crane, as well as winches that resemble the claws of a velociraptor, rusting cogwheels and the rails of a tramway line.

The dinosaur comparisons come easy thanks to the giant size of the abandoned machines and the way they point to a lumbering, less refined past. Industrial sites are rarely preserved, but here quarrying methods are showcased, along with the sweaty efforts that European settlers faced in sourcing natural resources from remote areas.

Early Victoria had to import its sandstone. Then in the mid-1860s a stone mason called Francis Watkins was hunting at Mt Difficult when he spotted the region's high-quality, durable rock.

He took out a lease on the land and by the 1870s was supplying gold-rush town Stawell with stone for its courthouse, Anglican and Catholic churches, town hall and tombstones. By 1882 a tramway connected Stawell with the quarry.

A visiting parliamentary party was so taken with Stawell's courthouse that it decided Parliament House should be built of the same material. Heatherlie's sandstone had excellent grain, texture and colour. It was weather resistant but easy to work. By 1880, its blocks were being hoisted onto Parliament House.

The quarry would go on to supply stone for Melbourne's town hall, state library, GPO, Regent Theatre and Port Authority Building, among others. And so stone from the ugly-duckling site of this little bush quarry was transformed into some elegant architectural swans.

Much of what you see at Heatherlie Quarry dates from its 1890s heyday, when it employed a hundred workers. After the Second World War the quarry began to peter out, and its stone was used mainly for the repair of existing buildings.

You can rummage around the entrails of machines, tanks for storing compressed air and rust-red tramway trolleys. Orchids and wildflowers create a dainty contrast to the steampunk leftovers.

The GPO in Bourke Street Mall is now a shopping arcade. Photo: Josie Withers Several partially renovated cottages were once home to Italian immigrant workers though most quarrymen camped or commuted from Stawell or Fyans Creek.

All this is explained by useful signage, which also displays photographs of the quarry in action.

One picture shows workers in waistcoats and jackets standing in front of a locomotive that belches steam like a dragon. Another captures quarrymen stripped down to shirts and braces as they swing hammers and load railway trolleys.

The State Library of Victoria.  Photo: Roberto Seba In the early days, explosives were used to blast the stone out of the hillside; you can see the pits in the earth were the explosives were stored. This rambunctious approach to quarrying was soon abandoned, as it wasted too much stone.

The stone would later be separated along fracture lines by use of wedges and plugs, an ancient technique used since the time the Egyptians were building their pyramids.

You can still see the drill lines on the rock face, and the blocks of stone tumbled at its foot like a set of dice shaken by a giant. A glimpse of Melbourne's messy birth, you might say, frozen in time, but not quite entirely forgotten.

STAY The basic Plantation Campground near Heatherlie Quarry is run by Parks Victoria and has spaces for caravans, trailers and tents. Halls Gap, 15 kilometres south, has abundant accommodation options. See visithallsgap.com.au VISIT Heatherlie Quarry Heritage Site is in Grampians National Park, a three-hour drive northwest of Melbourne. See parks.vic.gov.au <www.traveller.com.au/heatherlie-quarry-the-ugly-abandoned-hole-that-created-melbourne-h202a0>

[Nearly 20 years ago, one party wanted to complete Parliament House to its original plans, and reactivate the quarry to do so. One of the quangos vetoed that, on environmental grounds; sacred-site vetoes hadn't yet emerged.]

 "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-d.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-c.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-b.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-a.jpg" 

 






Heatherlie quarry (Vic.)

Roderick Smith
 

Roderick Smith

I traced VR and the quarry with an ARHS group in about 1970.

Dec 1 2021 Heatherlie Quarry: The ugly, abandoned hole that created Melbourne  Brian Johnston Heatherlie Quarry near the Grampians was the source of stone for many of Melbourne's most important buildings. Photo: Chris O'Connell Melbourne's grandest buildings were shovelled out of a hole in the ground. Obviously, of course, if you've ever thought about it. But who thinks much about where building material comes from? Not travellers. Travellers admire buildings already constructed, or attractively ruined. We care much less about how they were born.

You can visit the womb of Melbourne, though. You can see the spot where all those gracious turrets, pompous pillars and civic curlicues of the town hall and state library came from. Their raw materials. The dusty and violent process by which they came into being, and the humble origins of the city's boastful architecture.

That place is Heatherlie Quarry, deep in rural Victoria on the northeast edge of the Grampians National Park. If you ever visit this region – and with the Grampians' dramatic peaks, waterfalls and wildflowers why wouldn't you – then you should certainly drop by this overlooked remnant of industrial heritage. This hole in the ground might not be worth a journey in itself, but is certainly worth a detour.

Abandoned mining equipment can still be seen at the quarry.  Photo: Chris O'Connell From the carpark on Mt Zero Road a flat, easy track leads through bushland for just over a kilometre to the historic site. Soon you'll come across a gigantic old boiler that lies amid crackle-dry grasses and brittle drifts of gum leaves like the body of a wounded brontosaurus.

Nearby is the skeleton of an old crane, as well as winches that resemble the claws of a velociraptor, rusting cogwheels and the rails of a tramway line.

The dinosaur comparisons come easy thanks to the giant size of the abandoned machines and the way they point to a lumbering, less refined past. Industrial sites are rarely preserved, but here quarrying methods are showcased, along with the sweaty efforts that European settlers faced in sourcing natural resources from remote areas.

Early Victoria had to import its sandstone. Then in the mid-1860s a stone mason called Francis Watkins was hunting at Mt Difficult when he spotted the region's high-quality, durable rock.

He took out a lease on the land and by the 1870s was supplying gold-rush town Stawell with stone for its courthouse, Anglican and Catholic churches, town hall and tombstones. By 1882 a tramway connected Stawell with the quarry.

A visiting parliamentary party was so taken with Stawell's courthouse that it decided Parliament House should be built of the same material. Heatherlie's sandstone had excellent grain, texture and colour. It was weather resistant but easy to work. By 1880, its blocks were being hoisted onto Parliament House.

The quarry would go on to supply stone for Melbourne's town hall, state library, GPO, Regent Theatre and Port Authority Building, among others. And so stone from the ugly-duckling site of this little bush quarry was transformed into some elegant architectural swans.

Much of what you see at Heatherlie Quarry dates from its 1890s heyday, when it employed a hundred workers. After the Second World War the quarry began to peter out, and its stone was used mainly for the repair of existing buildings.

You can rummage around the entrails of machines, tanks for storing compressed air and rust-red tramway trolleys. Orchids and wildflowers create a dainty contrast to the steampunk leftovers.

The GPO in Bourke Street Mall is now a shopping arcade. Photo: Josie Withers Several partially renovated cottages were once home to Italian immigrant workers though most quarrymen camped or commuted from Stawell or Fyans Creek.

All this is explained by useful signage, which also displays photographs of the quarry in action.

One picture shows workers in waistcoats and jackets standing in front of a locomotive that belches steam like a dragon. Another captures quarrymen stripped down to shirts and braces as they swing hammers and load railway trolleys.

The State Library of Victoria.  Photo: Roberto Seba In the early days, explosives were used to blast the stone out of the hillside; you can see the pits in the earth were the explosives were stored. This rambunctious approach to quarrying was soon abandoned, as it wasted too much stone.

The stone would later be separated along fracture lines by use of wedges and plugs, an ancient technique used since the time the Egyptians were building their pyramids.

You can still see the drill lines on the rock face, and the blocks of stone tumbled at its foot like a set of dice shaken by a giant. A glimpse of Melbourne's messy birth, you might say, frozen in time, but not quite entirely forgotten.

STAY The basic Plantation Campground near Heatherlie Quarry is run by Parks Victoria and has spaces for caravans, trailers and tents. Halls Gap, 15 kilometres south, has abundant accommodation options. See visithallsgap.com.au VISIT Heatherlie Quarry Heritage Site is in Grampians National Park, a three-hour drive northwest of Melbourne. See parks.vic.gov.au <www.traveller.com.au/heatherlie-quarry-the-ugly-abandoned-hole-that-created-melbourne-h202a0>

[Nearly 20 years ago, one party wanted to complete Parliament House to its original plans, and reactivate the quarry to do so. One of the quangos vetoed that, on environmental grounds; sacred-site vetoes hadn't yet emerged.]

 "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-d.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-c.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-b.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-a.jpg"


Heatherlie Quarry (Vic.)

Roderick Smith
 

*** Dec 1 2021 Heatherlie Quarry: The ugly, abandoned hole that created Melbourne  Brian Johnston
Heatherlie Quarry near the Grampians was the source of stone for many of Melbourne's most important buildings. Photo: Chris O'Connell
Melbourne's grandest buildings were shovelled out of a hole in the ground. Obviously, of course, if you've ever thought about it. But who thinks much about where building material comes from? Not travellers. Travellers admire buildings already constructed, or attractively ruined. We care much less about how they were born.
You can visit the womb of Melbourne, though. You can see the spot where all those gracious turrets, pompous pillars and civic curlicues of the town hall and state library came from. Their raw materials. The dusty and violent process by which they came into being, and the humble origins of the city's boastful architecture.
That place is Heatherlie Quarry, deep in rural Victoria on the northeast edge of the Grampians National Park. If you ever visit this region – and with the Grampians' dramatic peaks, waterfalls and wildflowers why wouldn't you – then you should certainly drop by this overlooked remnant of industrial heritage. This hole in the ground might not be worth a journey in itself, but is certainly worth a detour.
Abandoned mining equipment can still be seen at the quarry.  Photo: Chris O'Connell
From the carpark on Mt Zero Road a flat, easy track leads through bushland for just over a kilometre to the historic site. Soon you'll come across a gigantic old boiler that lies amid crackle-dry grasses and brittle drifts of gum leaves like the body of a wounded brontosaurus.
Nearby is the skeleton of an old crane, as well as winches that resemble the claws of a velociraptor, rusting cogwheels and the rails of a tramway line.
The dinosaur comparisons come easy thanks to the giant size of the abandoned machines and the way they point to a lumbering, less refined past. Industrial sites are rarely preserved, but here quarrying methods are showcased, along with the sweaty efforts that European settlers faced in sourcing natural resources from remote areas.
Early Victoria had to import its sandstone. Then in the mid-1860s a stone mason called Francis Watkins was hunting at Mt Difficult when he spotted the region's high-quality, durable rock.
He took out a lease on the land and by the 1870s was supplying gold-rush town Stawell with stone for its courthouse, Anglican and Catholic churches, town hall and tombstones. By 1882 a tramway connected Stawell with the quarry.
A visiting parliamentary party was so taken with Stawell's courthouse that it decided Parliament House should be built of the same material. Heatherlie's sandstone had excellent grain, texture and colour. It was weather resistant but easy to work. By 1880, its blocks were being hoisted onto Parliament House.
The quarry would go on to supply stone for Melbourne's town hall, state library, GPO, Regent Theatre and Port Authority Building, among others. And so stone from the ugly-duckling site of this little bush quarry was transformed into some elegant architectural swans.
Much of what you see at Heatherlie Quarry dates from its 1890s heyday, when it employed a hundred workers. After the Second World War the quarry began to peter out, and its stone was used mainly for the repair of existing buildings.
You can rummage around the entrails of machines, tanks for storing compressed air and rust-red tramway trolleys. Orchids and wildflowers create a dainty contrast to the steampunk leftovers.
The GPO in Bourke Street Mall is now a shopping arcade. Photo: Josie Withers
Several partially renovated cottages were once home to Italian immigrant workers though most quarrymen camped or commuted from Stawell or Fyans Creek.
All this is explained by useful signage, which also displays photographs of the quarry in action.
One picture shows workers in waistcoats and jackets standing in front of a locomotive that belches steam like a dragon. Another captures quarrymen stripped down to shirts and braces as they swing hammers and load railway trolleys.
The State Library of Victoria.  Photo: Roberto Seba
In the early days, explosives were used to blast the stone out of the hillside; you can see the pits in the earth were the explosives were stored. This rambunctious approach to quarrying was soon abandoned, as it wasted too much stone.
The stone would later be separated along fracture lines by use of wedges and plugs, an ancient technique used since the time the Egyptians were building their pyramids.
You can still see the drill lines on the rock face, and the blocks of stone tumbled at its foot like a set of dice shaken by a giant. A glimpse of Melbourne's messy birth, you might say, frozen in time, but not quite entirely forgotten.
STAY The basic Plantation Campground near Heatherlie Quarry is run by Parks Victoria and has spaces for caravans, trailers and tents. Halls Gap, 15 kilometres south, has abundant accommodation options. See visithallsgap.com.au
VISIT Heatherlie Quarry Heritage Site is in Grampians National Park, a three-hour drive northwest of Melbourne. See parks.vic.gov.au
<www.traveller.com.au/heatherlie-quarry-the-ugly-abandoned-hole-that-created-melbourne-h202a0>
[Nearly 20 years ago, one party wanted to complete Parliament House to its original plans, and reactivate the quarry to do so. One of the quangos vetoed that, on environmental grounds; sacred-site vetoes hadn't yet emerged.]

"211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-b.jpg" "211201W-Fairfax-Traveller-Heatherlie.quarry-a.jpg"


Google Earth 2021 track overlay

Petan
 

Hi Folks
Since some are not on Facebook, I am advising that John Paff has just released his latest (2021) Aus Tracks Google Earth kmz overlay file. This is sometimes termed the Hairyleg file as that was John Paff’s Railpage user name. AUS Tracks 2021-08-14. Remember to move file from the temporary Google Earth installation location up to the permanent location in Google Earth once installed for the first time.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1M9jbXBhPgcSP8AauDG2TD07MA8ruDgYz/view

Just just save that on your system and then after saving it on your computer, click on it and it should open in Google Earth.

John Paff said to share this with as many people as might be interested, and ask everyone to contribute if they can improve things. Several in this group have his email if needed, so just ask. John also noted this overlay contains the contributions of many people, and it’s a shame they all can’t be credited, but once again thank you, as I know a few in this QLD group have sent data to John.

John Paff also said there are people struggling to find tracks that have already been mapped, so please make this resource known as needed.

I also have an installation instruction page for the 2016 version available and the instructions are very similar https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwd3pVQk44YUVMWkU/view?resourcekey=0-eynML8QYxWJrVehOQpCjrg

Cheers
Peter Cokley


FREE - collection of Industrial Railway Record

Eddie Oliver
 

A massive collection of the Industrial Railway Record in beautiful condition is available free to a good home. It consists of all issues from 47 to 179 inclusive, missing only issues 48, 69 and 82; also various indexes, some books on industrial locomotives in Europe, and even a batch of postcard-size black and white captioned photos of small (industrial and other) European steam locos.

There is also a large batch of Railway World and some other non-industrial magazines available.

Only requirement is that they have to be collected from Kenthurst (north-western outskirts of Sydney, near Castle Hill and Dural) within the next four weeks, If you wanted them posted or couriered, that could be arranged but  it would be very expensive and you would need to cover all costs.

If you want them, please indicate as soon as possible. 


Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Rod Hutchinson
 

I eas able to transfer funds to Sri Lanka via my banks app using Swift Codes.  Very easy and quick.
Book arrived this morning.

Rod Hutchinson.


Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Mark Hambly
 

Quick Update:

Funds landed with the recipient in Sri Lanka about six days after sending from UK via Wise.

My book was posted in Sri Lanka last Saturday (23rd October) and has just arrived in middle England (knock on the door from Parcel Force at 7am on Friday 29th October), which by my reckoning is pretty good service all round.

Not yet looked at it!

Best regards,

Mark


Funeral of Graeme Inglis

Roderick Smith
 

Graeme's funeral: 15.30 Friday: http://www.myeventlive.com.au/gi/
It is restricted to 20 by covid rules.  I'm attending.  AFAIK Frank is attending.

Roderick


Re: Passing of Graeme Inglis

Frank Stamford
 

I was extremely sorry to here this news.

Graeme was very active in key positions in the LRRSA during the first half of the 1970s. He was Hon. Secretary in 1971 and 1972, Hon. Treasurer in 1973 and 1974, and committee-man in 1975. He was also involved in the organisation of many LRRSA activities.

Graeme, Bill Jessup, and I participated in a number of very interesting adventures looking for long lost tramways, such as south of Yarragon, Lal Lal, and a series of trips searching (and successfully finding) the McIvor tramway and its branches. He also shared with me a lot of the State Library research of newspaper files looking for McIvor tramway information. The LRRSA book on the McIvor tramway owes a lot to his input, from both on-the-ground research and library research. He found that the P & O Steam Navigation Co. had a tramway at Graytown. Without that information Chapter 2 of the book would not exist.

Much more recently he has been a regular attender at the LRRSA's Zoom meetings.

Frank Stamford

On 19/10/2021 12:42 pm, Roderick Smith via groups.io wrote:
I posted this to TDU via the group site to keep it in a thread.

This sad news hits hard: I am also over three score years and ten.
Graeme and I were contemporaries: part of a wide friendship circuit sharing enthusiasms and adventures, in the same manner as those about six years our senior.  Nearly all went on to be active supporters of the hobby, with many different groups.
Some memories are blurred: which were shared; which weren't?
We were regulars at Jack McLean's Wingrove.    In later years, Graeme was the regular loco mechanic.  He rarely operated, but spent his time fixing locos, and would take one home for major work, and return it next time.
Graeme's first school was at Perry Bridge (Gippsland).  In later years I made a point of driving home from Bairnsdale by that back road, then took my boat up Perry River.  IIRC his main career was at Blackburn Lakes Primary, as Principal.

I was at Daylesford on a steam tour.  Graeme was there in his new Datsun 1600, and we explored the remains of the route to Newlyn in the break.  He made a three-point turn, and backed into a stump: the car's first dent.
In 1974, Stephen McLean and I had an adventurous journey to Normanton: fly to Brisbane, train to Cairns, fly to Normanton.  We settled into lunch in our pub, and Graeme arrived.  He had just driven from Melbourne with friends via inland roads, most of which were unsurfaced.  All five of us rode the Wednesday railmotor to Croydon, returning next day.
He was on LRRSA Council amongst his many hobby interests, and was a member of the group which inspected Tasmania one Queens Birthday long weekend.
Here are the first three photos which I can find fast.
740829Th-SMcL24-RM74.  Front: Graeme & Clyde; rear Roderick and Alan
750615Su-GS33-ZeehanMuseum-GInglis-RSmith
750616M-GT18-LuneRiver-RSmith Graeme is in the second row, behind the blue jumper.


Roderick Smith





Re: Passing of Graeme Inglis

Roderick Smith
 

I posted this to TDU via the group site to keep it in a thread.

This sad news hits hard: I am also over three score years and ten.
Graeme and I were contemporaries: part of a wide friendship circuit sharing enthusiasms and adventures, in the same manner as those about six years our senior.  Nearly all went on to be active supporters of the hobby, with many different groups.
Some memories are blurred: which were shared; which weren't?
We were regulars at Jack McLean's Wingrove.    In later years, Graeme was the regular loco mechanic.  He rarely operated, but spent his time fixing locos, and would take one home for major work, and return it next time.
Graeme's first school was at Perry Bridge (Gippsland).  In later years I made a point of driving home from Bairnsdale by that back road, then took my boat up Perry River.  IIRC his main career was at Blackburn Lakes Primary, as Principal.

I was at Daylesford on a steam tour.  Graeme was there in his new Datsun 1600, and we explored the remains of the route to Newlyn in the break.  He made a three-point turn, and backed into a stump: the car's first dent.
In 1974, Stephen McLean and I had an adventurous journey to Normanton: fly to Brisbane, train to Cairns, fly to Normanton.  We settled into lunch in our pub, and Graeme arrived.  He had just driven from Melbourne with friends via inland roads, most of which were unsurfaced.  All five of us rode the Wednesday railmotor to Croydon, returning next day.
He was on LRRSA Council amongst his many hobby interests, and was a member of the group which inspected Tasmania one Queens Birthday long weekend.
Here are the first three photos which I can find fast. 
740829Th-SMcL24-RM74.  Front: Graeme & Clyde; rear Roderick and Alan
750615Su-GS33-ZeehanMuseum-GInglis-RSmith
750616M-GT18-LuneRiver-RSmith Graeme is in the second row, behind the blue jumper.


Roderick Smith


Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Mark Hambly
 

Gents,

I successfully used Wise yesterday to send USD via Swift from UK to the author’s USD denominated account at his bank in Sri Lanka.

Wise offers a facility whereby if the sender pays a modest extra amount the recipient is guaranteed to receive the full amount sent without any fee attrition en-route.

Incidentally the author was offering purchasers the option to select a particular numbered copy from the print run of 500, and to have him sign it.

Mark


Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Stephen Cox
 

If the account is in Sri Lanka, then Wise will have to use the SWIFT system to transfer the money.  In that case, the local bank may impose a charge.  The recipient would have to check this out with his bank.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox
 


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 14:08
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

The account is in US dollars. 

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 13:48, Stephen Cox <scox@...> wrote:
I just checked their web site.  It appears if you send US$ that uses the SWIFT system and there may be local charges at the recipients end.  If you send LKR doesn't appear to be.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 13:32
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Does using wise impose any fees on the recipient?

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 13:22, Stephen Cox <scox@...> wrote:
There is a company now called Wise (formerly Transferwise) at www.wise.com that offers international bank transfers on line at very competitive rates, certainly much better than the big banks in Australia.  I just checked and they would have sent US$72.50 to Sri Lanka for AU$99.95 all up today.  I haven't used them recently but have found them to be very good when I have used them.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 12:01
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge

It cost me $109.44 to pay online, from my desk, by International Bank Transfer. (Probably could have done it on my phone, sitting on the couch). Will cost more if you go to a bank branch. 

John

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 11:17, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
On my first visit to Sri Lanka, I travelled on the surviving portion of the 762 mm gauge.
On my second trip, the line had been converted to bg, but some equipment had been retained in working order, and could steam over a short section at the workshops.
AFAIK PBR investigated importing one of the two Sentinel steam railmotors.
Workshops operation has ceased; there is a trust in UK aiming to obtain them.

I was headhunted to supply photos for the book 'Narrow gauge railways of Ceylon'.
It is limited edition, 500 copies.  My experience here is that that covers the likely sales anyhow.
I was intending to contact our online bookshop with a view to placing an on-spec order, or to collating orders into one batch for economy with bank fees and delivery.
That won't work.  The self-published author isn't supplying bulk: partly the quantity printed; mainly the way the Sri Lankan post office works.
Single orders only.
USD50 for the book, plus USD22.50 for international registered postage.
Sri Lanka bans Paypal.  Anyone interested will have to email the author, and get the bsb details.
I will be ordering a copy, and not just because I have a few photos in it.
It is a comprehensive work, not just a coffee-table pictorial.
There is very little published about Sri Lanka (Thailand is in a similar category).

Enclosed is the brochure, which omitted the contact address. rasikabookz@...
I have a 3 MB jpg of a book review, which I have to convert to pdf or put through ocr to post.  I'll do that separately, and probably not today.

If we have any social time around Thursday's meeting, I can answer any questions.

Roderick Smith



Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

John Dennis
 

The account is in US dollars. 


On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 13:48, Stephen Cox <scox@...> wrote:
I just checked their web site.  It appears if you send US$ that uses the SWIFT system and there may be local charges at the recipients end.  If you send LKR doesn't appear to be.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 13:32
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Does using wise impose any fees on the recipient?

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 13:22, Stephen Cox <scox@...> wrote:
There is a company now called Wise (formerly Transferwise) at www.wise.com that offers international bank transfers on line at very competitive rates, certainly much better than the big banks in Australia.  I just checked and they would have sent US$72.50 to Sri Lanka for AU$99.95 all up today.  I haven't used them recently but have found them to be very good when I have used them.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 12:01
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge

It cost me $109.44 to pay online, from my desk, by International Bank Transfer. (Probably could have done it on my phone, sitting on the couch). Will cost more if you go to a bank branch. 

John

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 11:17, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
On my first visit to Sri Lanka, I travelled on the surviving portion of the 762 mm gauge.
On my second trip, the line had been converted to bg, but some equipment had been retained in working order, and could steam over a short section at the workshops.
AFAIK PBR investigated importing one of the two Sentinel steam railmotors.
Workshops operation has ceased; there is a trust in UK aiming to obtain them.

I was headhunted to supply photos for the book 'Narrow gauge railways of Ceylon'.
It is limited edition, 500 copies.  My experience here is that that covers the likely sales anyhow.
I was intending to contact our online bookshop with a view to placing an on-spec order, or to collating orders into one batch for economy with bank fees and delivery.
That won't work.  The self-published author isn't supplying bulk: partly the quantity printed; mainly the way the Sri Lankan post office works.
Single orders only.
USD50 for the book, plus USD22.50 for international registered postage.
Sri Lanka bans Paypal.  Anyone interested will have to email the author, and get the bsb details.
I will be ordering a copy, and not just because I have a few photos in it.
It is a comprehensive work, not just a coffee-table pictorial.
There is very little published about Sri Lanka (Thailand is in a similar category).

Enclosed is the brochure, which omitted the contact address. rasikabookz@...
I have a 3 MB jpg of a book review, which I have to convert to pdf or put through ocr to post.  I'll do that separately, and probably not today.

If we have any social time around Thursday's meeting, I can answer any questions.

Roderick Smith



Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Stephen Cox
 

I just checked their web site.  It appears if you send US$ that uses the SWIFT system and there may be local charges at the recipients end.  If you send LKR doesn't appear to be.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 13:32
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Does using wise impose any fees on the recipient?

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 13:22, Stephen Cox <scox@...> wrote:
There is a company now called Wise (formerly Transferwise) at www.wise.com that offers international bank transfers on line at very competitive rates, certainly much better than the big banks in Australia.  I just checked and they would have sent US$72.50 to Sri Lanka for AU$99.95 all up today.  I haven't used them recently but have found them to be very good when I have used them.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 12:01
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge

It cost me $109.44 to pay online, from my desk, by International Bank Transfer. (Probably could have done it on my phone, sitting on the couch). Will cost more if you go to a bank branch. 

John

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 11:17, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
On my first visit to Sri Lanka, I travelled on the surviving portion of the 762 mm gauge.
On my second trip, the line had been converted to bg, but some equipment had been retained in working order, and could steam over a short section at the workshops.
AFAIK PBR investigated importing one of the two Sentinel steam railmotors.
Workshops operation has ceased; there is a trust in UK aiming to obtain them.

I was headhunted to supply photos for the book 'Narrow gauge railways of Ceylon'.
It is limited edition, 500 copies.  My experience here is that that covers the likely sales anyhow.
I was intending to contact our online bookshop with a view to placing an on-spec order, or to collating orders into one batch for economy with bank fees and delivery.
That won't work.  The self-published author isn't supplying bulk: partly the quantity printed; mainly the way the Sri Lankan post office works.
Single orders only.
USD50 for the book, plus USD22.50 for international registered postage.
Sri Lanka bans Paypal.  Anyone interested will have to email the author, and get the bsb details.
I will be ordering a copy, and not just because I have a few photos in it.
It is a comprehensive work, not just a coffee-table pictorial.
There is very little published about Sri Lanka (Thailand is in a similar category).

Enclosed is the brochure, which omitted the contact address. rasikabookz@...
I have a 3 MB jpg of a book review, which I have to convert to pdf or put through ocr to post.  I'll do that separately, and probably not today.

If we have any social time around Thursday's meeting, I can answer any questions.

Roderick Smith



Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

John Dennis
 

Does using wise impose any fees on the recipient?


On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 13:22, Stephen Cox <scox@...> wrote:
There is a company now called Wise (formerly Transferwise) at www.wise.com that offers international bank transfers on line at very competitive rates, certainly much better than the big banks in Australia.  I just checked and they would have sent US$72.50 to Sri Lanka for AU$99.95 all up today.  I haven't used them recently but have found them to be very good when I have used them.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 12:01
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge

It cost me $109.44 to pay online, from my desk, by International Bank Transfer. (Probably could have done it on my phone, sitting on the couch). Will cost more if you go to a bank branch. 

John

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 11:17, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
On my first visit to Sri Lanka, I travelled on the surviving portion of the 762 mm gauge.
On my second trip, the line had been converted to bg, but some equipment had been retained in working order, and could steam over a short section at the workshops.
AFAIK PBR investigated importing one of the two Sentinel steam railmotors.
Workshops operation has ceased; there is a trust in UK aiming to obtain them.

I was headhunted to supply photos for the book 'Narrow gauge railways of Ceylon'.
It is limited edition, 500 copies.  My experience here is that that covers the likely sales anyhow.
I was intending to contact our online bookshop with a view to placing an on-spec order, or to collating orders into one batch for economy with bank fees and delivery.
That won't work.  The self-published author isn't supplying bulk: partly the quantity printed; mainly the way the Sri Lankan post office works.
Single orders only.
USD50 for the book, plus USD22.50 for international registered postage.
Sri Lanka bans Paypal.  Anyone interested will have to email the author, and get the bsb details.
I will be ordering a copy, and not just because I have a few photos in it.
It is a comprehensive work, not just a coffee-table pictorial.
There is very little published about Sri Lanka (Thailand is in a similar category).

Enclosed is the brochure, which omitted the contact address. rasikabookz@...
I have a 3 MB jpg of a book review, which I have to convert to pdf or put through ocr to post.  I'll do that separately, and probably not today.

If we have any social time around Thursday's meeting, I can answer any questions.

Roderick Smith



Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge AND SENDING MONEY

Stephen Cox
 

There is a company now called Wise (formerly Transferwise) at www.wise.com that offers international bank transfers on line at very competitive rates, certainly much better than the big banks in Australia.  I just checked and they would have sent US$72.50 to Sri Lanka for AU$99.95 all up today.  I haven't used them recently but have found them to be very good when I have used them.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Cox


From: LRRSA@groups.io [mailto:LRRSA@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Dennis
Sent: Wednesday, 13 October 2021 12:01
To: LRRSA@groups.io
Subject: Re: [LRRSA] Sri Lanka narrow gauge

It cost me $109.44 to pay online, from my desk, by International Bank Transfer. (Probably could have done it on my phone, sitting on the couch). Will cost more if you go to a bank branch. 

John

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 11:17, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
On my first visit to Sri Lanka, I travelled on the surviving portion of the 762 mm gauge.
On my second trip, the line had been converted to bg, but some equipment had been retained in working order, and could steam over a short section at the workshops.
AFAIK PBR investigated importing one of the two Sentinel steam railmotors.
Workshops operation has ceased; there is a trust in UK aiming to obtain them.

I was headhunted to supply photos for the book 'Narrow gauge railways of Ceylon'.
It is limited edition, 500 copies.  My experience here is that that covers the likely sales anyhow.
I was intending to contact our online bookshop with a view to placing an on-spec order, or to collating orders into one batch for economy with bank fees and delivery.
That won't work.  The self-published author isn't supplying bulk: partly the quantity printed; mainly the way the Sri Lankan post office works.
Single orders only.
USD50 for the book, plus USD22.50 for international registered postage.
Sri Lanka bans Paypal.  Anyone interested will have to email the author, and get the bsb details.
I will be ordering a copy, and not just because I have a few photos in it.
It is a comprehensive work, not just a coffee-table pictorial.
There is very little published about Sri Lanka (Thailand is in a similar category).

Enclosed is the brochure, which omitted the contact address. rasikabookz@...
I have a 3 MB jpg of a book review, which I have to convert to pdf or put through ocr to post.  I'll do that separately, and probably not today.

If we have any social time around Thursday's meeting, I can answer any questions.

Roderick Smith



Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge

Roderick Smith
 

The pdf files are larger than the jpg, so I am posting the 3 MB jpg.

Sunday Times 2021.9.19.jpg

Roderick Smith


Re: Sri Lanka narrow gauge

John Dennis
 

It cost me $109.44 to pay online, from my desk, by International Bank Transfer. (Probably could have done it on my phone, sitting on the couch). Will cost more if you go to a bank branch. 

John

On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 at 11:17, Roderick Smith via groups.io <rnveditor=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
On my first visit to Sri Lanka, I travelled on the surviving portion of the 762 mm gauge.
On my second trip, the line had been converted to bg, but some equipment had been retained in working order, and could steam over a short section at the workshops.
AFAIK PBR investigated importing one of the two Sentinel steam railmotors.
Workshops operation has ceased; there is a trust in UK aiming to obtain them.

I was headhunted to supply photos for the book 'Narrow gauge railways of Ceylon'.
It is limited edition, 500 copies.  My experience here is that that covers the likely sales anyhow.
I was intending to contact our online bookshop with a view to placing an on-spec order, or to collating orders into one batch for economy with bank fees and delivery.
That won't work.  The self-published author isn't supplying bulk: partly the quantity printed; mainly the way the Sri Lankan post office works.
Single orders only.
USD50 for the book, plus USD22.50 for international registered postage.
Sri Lanka bans Paypal.  Anyone interested will have to email the author, and get the bsb details.
I will be ordering a copy, and not just because I have a few photos in it.
It is a comprehensive work, not just a coffee-table pictorial.
There is very little published about Sri Lanka (Thailand is in a similar category).

Enclosed is the brochure, which omitted the contact address. rasikabookz@...
I have a 3 MB jpg of a book review, which I have to convert to pdf or put through ocr to post.  I'll do that separately, and probably not today.

If we have any social time around Thursday's meeting, I can answer any questions.

Roderick Smith







1 - 20 of 10278