Re: Rye Limeworks


David Axup
 

Phil and Colin,

I had a look at the photos of the Rye Pier and they are very much as I
remember it. One of the photos in fact shows my father’s professional
fishing boat at anchor in the “gutter” as we called it. By the late
40’s early 50’s the tramway out the pier was used solely by the
professional fishermen to haul boxes of fish in from the shed at the
seaward end of the pier to their utes and fishing gear out to the shed
to load on to the boats – I did it many times. The trolley was a hand
propelled job which was padlocked with the half dozen professional
fishermen each having a key.

I knew of the Eivion as her wreck was supposed to lie off White Cliffs
even though she was wrecked against the pier. But back in the 50’s she
must have been covered in sand as we could never find her despite
spending hours with snorkel and face mask swimming up and down.

My next task is to get hold of the Ordnance Map and then start to pester
the local historical societies.

David Axup

-----Original Message-----
From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf Of Phil Rickard
Sent: Wednesday, 30 August 2006 10:49 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: Rye Limeworks

Further to Colin's interesting list below, a tramway is shown on the
pre-WWII Inch/Mile Military map, running southwards, on the east side
of Sandy Road (now Truemans Road), from the Point Nepean Road [Melway
169 E3], for a distance of about 2 kms. South of the Truemans Rd
Recreation Reserve, the line turns more south-easterly and seems to
terminate about Melway 169 E8.

Interestingly, the rail per the auction catalogue equates to over 2.2
MILES of track, but the sleepers are only sufficient for about 1.8
MILES. [note that the tonnages given in Lots 90, 91 and 92 do not
agree with the lengths/weights]

Picture Australia (www.pictureaustralia.org) has several pics of Rye
pier (with jetty tramway), however the Peninsula Lime & Fertilizer
works (on the cnr of Point Nepean Rd and Sandy Rd) were about half-way
between the Rye jetty and the Rosebud jetty so output could have gone
either way.

Observations: That Rye was used for the shipment of lime is evidenced
by the wreck of the ketch "Eivion" c.1920 at Rye pier, whilst engaged
in the lime trade. see Victorian Heritage Register No.S 345

Interested researchers may wish to get a copy of "An Archaeological
and Historical Overview of Limeburning in Victoria" see
http://www.heritage.vic.gov.au/page.asp?ID=191 or try Vic Info in
Collins St. Inexpensive, usually kept "out the back" as it's not a hot
seller!

I wonder if Lot 63 was a home-built job, utilising an old tractor and
converting it to rail? I'd love to see a photo - David, maybe one of
the historical societies on the peninsula can assist.

cheers Phil



--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Colin Harvey" <harveycr@o...> wrote:

David it must be your lucky day. While trawling through a box of
State Electicity Commission Records at the Public Record Office
yesterday (VPRS 8892/P1, Unit 360), I came across the auction
catalogue for the Rye plant. Details of the lots of possible tramway
interest are listed below.

Colin


J W Styles & Son auction catalogue: Brick Making and Lime
manufacturers Plant at Peninsula Lime & Fertiliser Co., Point Nepean
Road, Rye. Auction date 31 March 1941.

Lot 11 : Jim Crow bender
Lot 63 : 4-cylinder Wolseley Tractor, with 24 in gauge flanged steel
wheels, roller chain and sprocket drive.
Lot 72 : 24 Steel tippling trucks, 1 cubic yard capacity, with 24 in
gauge axles and steel flanged wheels
Lot 73 : Fordson Tractor, incomplete [no indication that this might
be a rail vehicle]
Lot 74 : Fordson Tractor, incomplete [no indication that this might
be a rail vehicle]
Lot 75 : 2 steel end flap trucks, with 24 in gauge flanged wheels.
Lot 76 : 6 tipping trucks, dismantled with 24 in gauge wheels.
Lot 82 : Fordson tractor engine and gear box.
Lot 89 : 1-18-2-0 of 24 lb steel rails, 30-18ft lengths.
Lot 90 : 8 ¼ tons of 24 lb steel rails, 96-18ft lengths.
Lot 91 : 8 ¼ tons of 24 lb steel rails, 96-18ft lengths.
Lot 92 : 8 ¼ tons of 24 lb steel rails, 96-18ft lengths.
Lot 93 : 5-11-1-20 of 24 lb steel rails, 78-24ft lengths.
Lot 94 : 1-2-3-0 of 15 lb steel rails, 32-16ft lengths.
Lot 95 : 5-13-0-16 of 24 lb steel rails, 88-18ft lengths.
Lot 96 : 3-15-1-20 of 24 lb steel rails, 66-16ft lengths.
Lot 97 : 2-17-0-16 of 24 lb steel rails, 50-16ft lengths.
Lot 98 : 4-6-0-5 of 24 lb steel rails, 75-16ft 6in lengths.
Lot 99 : 5-4-1-24 of 15 lb steel rails, 156-15ft lengths.
Lot 100 : 3-8-2-8 of 24 lb steel rails, 60-16ft lengths.
Lot 101 : 1-5-2-24 of 24 lb steel curved rails, 20-18ft lengths.
Lot 102 : 1 ton of 24 lb steel rails, 40-7ft lengths.
Lot 103 : 8-3-2-0 of 15 lb steel rails, 20-10ft lengths.
Lot 104 : 17-7-0-16 of 24 lb steel rails, 162-30ft lengths.
Lot 105 : 3-8-2-8 of 24 lb steel rails, 60-16ft lengths.
Lot 106 : Lot assorted steel rails
Lot 107 : 6 sets 24 gauge steel rail points
Lot 110 : 2000 Red Gum sleepers, 4ft x 8in x 3in
Lot 111 : 100 - 36in pressed steel sleepers, 24in gauge
Lot 112 : 600 Red Gum sleepers, 4ft x 8in x 3in
Lot 113 : Large quantity assorted Red Gum sleepers
Lot 114 : Lot Fish Plates and Dogs


----- Original Message -----
From: david_axup
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 1:34 PM
Subject: [LRRSA] Introduction


G'day All,

As a new member to the group I had better introduced myself. I live
in Melbourne and have had an interest in narrow gauge railways -
life size since I was a little tacker back in the distant past - and
more recently at 1:48 since I started modelling them.

I grew up on the lower end of the Mornington Peninsula in the '40s
and '50s far removed from the railway system but managed to get on
several ARHS trips anyway. A matter of abiding curiosity is the
lime industry on the Peninsula. There were several lime kilns at
the back of Rye one of which still had the remains of a narrow gauge
tramway at the kiln area. Rails and wheels and part of a right of
way which appeared to head towards Port Phillip was all that was
left in the early '50s. All trace of that kiln has now gone. As
the lime was transported to Melbourne and Geelong by small ship it
obviously had to get from the kiln to the sea. I have been
searching for years to see if there is any record of tramways in the
lower Peninsula area without any joy. If anyone has any information
as to their existence I would appreciate it. All I have found is
the record of the tramway that connected the pier at Sorrento to the
ocean beach and which was for passengers.

Cheers,

David Axup








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