Re: The gauge question ...


Colin Harvey
 

Peter (I've run out of salutations)

Did this not indicate a gauge substantially less than Standard?
Very suggestive of a gauge less than standard...but it could be metre
like Hartley Vale!

Colin


--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Peter Evans" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Dear Humble Colin,

I also seem to recall some photographic scaling going on to
determine the
gauge of the wierd geared steam beastie which as believed to be the
first
locomotive used on the line. Did this not indicate a gauge
substantially
less than Standard?

Respectfully
Sawdustoz.

_____

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au] On
Behalf
Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 2:22 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...


Peter

I have no doubt there was a 3ft 6in gauge sleeper, but was it from
the firewood line or one of the overburden tramways? I suspect the
latter is more likely. Not that this precludes the firewood tram
from being 3ft 6in gauge, it's just not sufficient evidence in my
opinion.

Humbly
Colin



--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "Peter Evans" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Colin,

I refer to colleague Rickard who measured a sleeper complete with
dogspike
holes beside the line (before it disappeared under McMansions and
Starter
Castles). I'm pretty sure that 3-ft 6-in gauge was the
measurement
obtained.

Cordially,
Sawdustoz.

_____

From: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au [mailto:LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au]
On
Behalf
Of Colin Harvey
Sent: Tuesday, 15 August 2006 1:55 PM
To: LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au
Subject: [LRRSA] Re: The gauge question ...


Mr Evans

What evidence to you have that David Mitchell's firewood tram was
3ft
6in gauge?

Colin

--- In LRRSA@yahoogroups.com.au, "sawdustoz" <pevans@s...> wrote:

Hi All,

Perhaps this group might like to consider light railways with a
gauge
greater than 3-ft 6-in? Victorian lines that spring to mind are
the
McIvor firewood line (5-ft 3-in), the early horse trams of the
Wombat
Forest south of Bendigo (also 5-ft 3-in), and the David
Mitchell
firewood tram (3-ft 6-in and, later, standard gauge). In
addition,
there were heaps of very traditional "light railways" with a
gauge of
3-
ft 6-in, especially in the Otway Forest and east of the
Powelltown
line.

Cheers,
PeterE.

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