Topics

Unknown sp.


M Gregory
 

Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Louisa Evers
 

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association


--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...


Ken Miracle
 

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


scottywarbler
 

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
 

Zeke …. You could very well be correct … fat head and stubby bill and some appear to have a lighter crown and lighter under the wing than I would expect with a Blackbird flock. On the Rosy-finches I shot in flight in 2019 in better light I see the wing bars that could be mistaken for red-winged epaulets in the darker images.

The lighting and exposure on Alan’s images could be making them look darker/blacker than they are.

Louisa and most others on IBLE are far more experienced birders than I am and I am not a Gray-crowned and Black Rosy-finch expert at all.

What makes you think Black Rosy-finch and not Gray-crowned or a mixed flock? It is hard for me to see all the ID marks I read about for them from the dark photos. The only Black Rosy-finches that I had photographed before the ones below were sitting not flying and I had to get some of the IBO biologists to help me sort out the Black from the Gray-crowned. And of course there are plummage variations in adults and with immature birds … just to drive me nuts :-)

Here is a large, what I Id’d as a mixed flock, with more Gray-crowned than Black. I photographed these in better light on 11-7-2019 near Succor Creek in Oregon and near the Idaho Border.




On Jan 8, 2021, at 10:26 PM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


scottywarbler
 

Looks like there are a few Grey-crowned mixed in. I see a few in the upper picture. Rosy’s are winter residents at a few locations here in The Wood River valley, specifically up at the old mining town of Triumph northeast of Hailey; and up in Elkhorn village area. I’ve spent a lot of time up there in the winter watching them. Often times we only see them flying around  in flocks and have to try and distinguish the two species against bright winter overcast skies. Grey-crowned’s are lighter on the belly than Black’s. You can see some rose coloration on the flanks of a few of the birds at extreme magnification in the photos. The wing bars also show some of that coloration as well. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 11:35 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

Zeke …. You could very well be correct … fat head and stubby bill and some appear to have a lighter crown and lighter under the wing than I would expect with a Blackbird flock. On the Rosy-finches I shot in flight in 2019 in better light I see the wing bars that could be mistaken for red-winged epaulets in the darker images.

The lighting and exposure on Alan’s images could be making them look darker/blacker than they are.

Louisa and most others on IBLE are far more experienced birders than I am and I am not a Gray-crowned and Black Rosy-finch expert at all.

What makes you think Black Rosy-finch and not Gray-crowned or a mixed flock? It is hard for me to see all the ID marks I read about for them from the dark photos. The only Black Rosy-finches that I had photographed before the ones below were sitting not flying and I had to get some of the IBO biologists to help me sort out the Black from the Gray-crowned. And of course there are plummage variations in adults and with immature birds … just to drive me nuts :-)

Here is a large, what I Id’d as a mixed flock, with more Gray-crowned than Black. I photographed these in better light on 11-7-2019 near Succor Creek in Oregon and near the Idaho Border.

<_KMM2701.jpg>

<_KMM2720.jpg>


On Jan 8, 2021, at 10:26 PM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
 

There has been a mixed flock that winters in the Hammer Flats area and roosts in the black cliffs near Lucky Peak State Park Discovery Unit.

My brother-in-law lives on the lower end of East Fork I have heard about the flocks up at Triumph but have not encountered them.

Thanks for the info.

That flock of Rosy-finches that swirled around me when I was out chukar hunting with some friends was exciting. My friends had a pretty good day with their shotguns on chukars but I bagged more birds with my camera :-)

On Jan 9, 2021, at 6:39 AM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

Looks like there are a few Grey-crowned mixed in. I see a few in the upper picture. Rosy’s are winter residents at a few locations here in The Wood River valley, specifically up at the old mining town of Triumph northeast of Hailey; and up in Elkhorn village area. I’ve spent a lot of time up there in the winter watching them. Often times we only see them flying around  in flocks and have to try and distinguish the two species against bright winter overcast skies. Grey-crowned’s are lighter on the belly than Black’s. You can see some rose coloration on the flanks of a few of the birds at extreme magnification in the photos. The wing bars also show some of that coloration as well. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 11:35 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

Zeke …. You could very well be correct … fat head and stubby bill and some appear to have a lighter crown and lighter under the wing than I would expect with a Blackbird flock. On the Rosy-finches I shot in flight in 2019 in better light I see the wing bars that could be mistaken for red-winged epaulets in the darker images.

The lighting and exposure on Alan’s images could be making them look darker/blacker than they are.

Louisa and most others on IBLE are far more experienced birders than I am and I am not a Gray-crowned and Black Rosy-finch expert at all.

What makes you think Black Rosy-finch and not Gray-crowned or a mixed flock? It is hard for me to see all the ID marks I read about for them from the dark photos. The only Black Rosy-finches that I had photographed before the ones below were sitting not flying and I had to get some of the IBO biologists to help me sort out the Black from the Gray-crowned. And of course there are plummage variations in adults and with immature birds … just to drive me nuts :-)

Here is a large, what I Id’d as a mixed flock, with more Gray-crowned than Black. I photographed these in better light on 11-7-2019 near Succor Creek in Oregon and near the Idaho Border.

<_KMM2701.jpg>

<_KMM2720.jpg>


On Jan 8, 2021, at 10:26 PM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


M Gregory
 

I figured it out by going back out there this morning. The birds are Horned Larks and they are feeding on farmland that has been tilled straight across the road from where I photographed them yesterday. The backlighting was strong yesterday and again today, making photography difficult.
Alan Gregory


On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 6:47 PM M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Cliff Weisse
 

There may have been Horned Larks there today but the birds in your photos from yesterday are not Horned Larks. Thick based bills, pot bellied look, and pale bar on wing coverts are on consistent with Horned Lark. I think Zeke has it right, they are Rosy Finches but I'm not going to attempt to identify them to species.

Cliff


On 1/9/21 11:20 AM, M Gregory wrote:
I figured it out by going back out there this morning. The birds are Horned Larks and they are feeding on farmland that has been tilled straight across the road from where I photographed them yesterday. The backlighting was strong yesterday and again today, making photography difficult.
Alan Gregory

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 6:47 PM M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association


--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association
-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


Ken Miracle
 

From my experience with flocks of Horned Larks in flight they show a lot of white even in backlight situations. I would still agree with Zeke that the birds in Alan’s photographs are most probably Black and Gray-crowned Rosy Finches and I really do not see horned lark field marks but as I said before I am not the experienced birder many others on IBLE like Cliff and others are.

Photographing birds in a backlight situation is always difficult. Just in case anyone is interested …. the fastest way I know to adjust quickly is using exposure value compensation EV …. when I remember and do not get lazy about it  … I just push the button and turn the wheel to add 1 to 2 stops of exposure compensation. Since I am shooting in manual mode with auto ISO that usually results in higher ISO and but let’s me have less if any lightening to do on the computer and easier to see field marks and I need all the help I can get with ID.

On Jan 9, 2021, at 11:27 AM, Cliff Weisse <cliffandlisa@...> wrote:

There may have been Horned Larks there today but the birds in your photos from yesterday are not Horned Larks. Thick based bills, pot bellied look, and pale bar on wing coverts are on consistent with Horned Lark. I think Zeke has it right, they are Rosy Finches but I'm not going to attempt to identify them to species.

Cliff


On 1/9/21 11:20 AM, M Gregory wrote:
I figured it out by going back out there this morning. The birds are Horned Larks and they are feeding on farmland that has been tilled straight across the road from where I photographed them yesterday. The backlighting was strong yesterday and again today, making photography difficult.
Alan Gregory

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 6:47 PM M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association


--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association
-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


M Gregory
 

Thank you for your insight on the sp. and photography. I am going back over therein a bit with my big telephoto lens. The pale, translucent flight feathers of rosy finches stand out to me now.
Alan Gregory


On Sat, Jan 9, 2021 at 11:47 AM Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
From my experience with flocks of Horned Larks in flight they show a lot of white even in backlight situations. I would still agree with Zeke that the birds in Alan’s photographs are most probably Black and Gray-crowned Rosy Finches and I really do not see horned lark field marks but as I said before I am not the experienced birder many others on IBLE like Cliff and others are.

Photographing birds in a backlight situation is always difficult. Just in case anyone is interested …. the fastest way I know to adjust quickly is using exposure value compensation EV …. when I remember and do not get lazy about it  … I just push the button and turn the wheel to add 1 to 2 stops of exposure compensation. Since I am shooting in manual mode with auto ISO that usually results in higher ISO and but let’s me have less if any lightening to do on the computer and easier to see field marks and I need all the help I can get with ID.

On Jan 9, 2021, at 11:27 AM, Cliff Weisse <cliffandlisa@...> wrote:

There may have been Horned Larks there today but the birds in your photos from yesterday are not Horned Larks. Thick based bills, pot bellied look, and pale bar on wing coverts are on consistent with Horned Lark. I think Zeke has it right, they are Rosy Finches but I'm not going to attempt to identify them to species.

Cliff


On 1/9/21 11:20 AM, M Gregory wrote:
I figured it out by going back out there this morning. The birds are Horned Larks and they are feeding on farmland that has been tilled straight across the road from where I photographed them yesterday. The backlighting was strong yesterday and again today, making photography difficult.
Alan Gregory

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 6:47 PM M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association


--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association
-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5



--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association