Raptors at Tubac 3/18/2021


Diann Stone
 

Brian Carrigan's posting inspired me to share my recent observations with you. I'm in Tucson, AZ currently and enjoying different opportunities here. Hawk watch is on during the month of March, usually peaking around the 15th. I was at the official hawk watch location on 3/12 and again 3/18. Following is my narrative of 3/18/2021.

---------- Forwarded message -----
From: Diann Stone <dstoneak2id@...>
Date: Sat, Mar 20, 2021, 3:26 PM
Subject: Raptors at Tubac 3/18/2021


There are no photos with my posting, but if there were, you would see a Zone-tailed Hawk, Common Black Hawk, Gray Hawk, and in one frame both a very light and a very dark Red-tailed Hawk. The images are embedded in my brain. Thursday was the best ever Tubac Hawk Watch Day. So many birds!  There were too many for me to keep a tally. Common Black Hawks were overhead all morning, mostly in small groups. We would watch them approach, soar overhead, then continue across the sky heading northward. What a thrill! We birders often complain about "warbler neck" from looking high into the trees. "Raptor neck" is almost as bad, but a malady I accept for the grand rewards it brings.

On the drive to Tubac:
Mourning Dove
Rock Dove/Pigeon
Gila Woodpecker
Red-tailed Hawk

At Ron Morriss County Park:
Zone-Tailed Hawk
Common Black Hawk
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture
Gray Hawk
American Kestrel
 Sharp-shinned Hawk
Common Raven
 Anna's Hummingbird, 
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Vermillion Flycatcher

On to Tumacacori to eat picnic lunch and walk part of the De Anza Trail.

Rufous-winged Sparrow
Verdin
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Hutton's Vireo
Black Phoebe
Turkey Vulture (4)
Red-tailed Hawk
White-crowned Sparrow
Gray Hawk (heard in Cottonwoods)
Hermit Thrush
Northern Cardinal
Curve-billed Thrasher
Western Kingbird

So there you have it. A happy amateur's bird list for one wonderful day!  

If you want an excellent book to practice your raptor identification skills, I recommend The Crossley ID Guide, Raptors . 101 color plates, species descriptions, maps, comparison photos and self-testing photos galore. 

Diann Stone (Boise)
"Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt." John Muir


climb_on2002
 

Are you still here in Tubac?

MaDWhitham
Suivez vos rêves aujourd’hui!! 
Demain n’arrivera peut-être jamais

On Mar 21, 2021, at 2:32 PM, Diann Stone <dstoneak2id@...> wrote:


Brian Carrigan's posting inspired me to share my recent observations with you. I'm in Tucson, AZ currently and enjoying different opportunities here. Hawk watch is on during the month of March, usually peaking around the 15th. I was at the official hawk watch location on 3/12 and again 3/18. Following is my narrative of 3/18/2021.

---------- Forwarded message -----
From: Diann Stone <dstoneak2id@...>
Date: Sat, Mar 20, 2021, 3:26 PM
Subject: Raptors at Tubac 3/18/2021


There are no photos with my posting, but if there were, you would see a Zone-tailed Hawk, Common Black Hawk, Gray Hawk, and in one frame both a very light and a very dark Red-tailed Hawk. The images are embedded in my brain. Thursday was the best ever Tubac Hawk Watch Day. So many birds!  There were too many for me to keep a tally. Common Black Hawks were overhead all morning, mostly in small groups. We would watch them approach, soar overhead, then continue across the sky heading northward. What a thrill! We birders often complain about "warbler neck" from looking high into the trees. "Raptor neck" is almost as bad, but a malady I accept for the grand rewards it brings.

On the drive to Tubac:
Mourning Dove
Rock Dove/Pigeon
Gila Woodpecker
Red-tailed Hawk

At Ron Morriss County Park:
Zone-Tailed Hawk
Common Black Hawk
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture
Gray Hawk
American Kestrel
 Sharp-shinned Hawk
Common Raven
 Anna's Hummingbird, 
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Vermillion Flycatcher

On to Tumacacori to eat picnic lunch and walk part of the De Anza Trail.

Rufous-winged Sparrow
Verdin
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Hutton's Vireo
Black Phoebe
Turkey Vulture (4)
Red-tailed Hawk
White-crowned Sparrow
Gray Hawk (heard in Cottonwoods)
Hermit Thrush
Northern Cardinal
Curve-billed Thrasher
Western Kingbird

So there you have it. A happy amateur's bird list for one wonderful day!  

If you want an excellent book to practice your raptor identification skills, I recommend The Crossley ID Guide, Raptors . 101 color plates, species descriptions, maps, comparison photos and self-testing photos galore. 

Diann Stone (Boise)
"Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt." John Muir


--
MaDWhitham
Follow your dreams today, tomorrow’s not a guarantee