Topics

Lesser Goldfinches -- Again


Scott Tuthill
 

I meant to add some thoughts to the messages a week ago, but I had to find the document with the notes I wanted to pass on. First, I would say that Lesser Goldfinches have, over the last 20 years, undergone the largest range and population expansion of any bird in, at least, the Boise/Treasure Valley area. It also has a very special place on my life list as, I believe, the only bird where I saw my "lifer" in my yard. I remember looking out one day and saw a small group feeding in lavender plants in our front yard.

As far as the notes I wanted to pass on - I have a copy of a 1986 publication "The Status of Historically Rare or Unrecorded Birds in Idaho" by Daniel Taylor and Charles Trost. The description of the Lesser Goldfinch is as follows: "This goldfinch is causal in Oregon, Wyoming, and British Columbia. It has been reported without detail to occur at Minidoka NWR as a rare spring and fall visitor. One was at the Portneuf Gap near Pocatello on 21 May 1976. Four were at Caldwell, Canyon Co. on 12-15 April 1980 and a pair (same birds?) were at nearby Nampa a month later. One was in Shoshone Basin, Lincoln Co. on 19 May 1982. They have been observed in Twin Falls Co. at T. 12S, R. 17E, Sec. 21 on 16 June 1979 and at Mullen Creek on 24 August 1979." So, 35 years ago, more or less, Lesser Goldfinches were so uncommon in Idaho that individual records were still being recognized. And, today, as I type this one is in the tree outside my window and more are coming into my thistle feeders than the sum total of the records mentioned in the 1986 publication. Pretty interesting.

Scott Tuthill


Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

In Nampa yesterday I had 2-3 lesser GF, in my native wildflowers, this being a first non winter backyard observation.
Rich Rusnak


On Aug 8, 2020, at 8:05 AM, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:

I meant to add some thoughts to the messages a week ago, but I had to find the document with the notes I wanted to pass on. First, I would say that Lesser Goldfinches have, over the last 20 years, undergone the largest range and population expansion of any bird in, at least, the Boise/Treasure Valley area. It also has a very special place on my life list as, I believe, the only bird where I saw my "lifer" in my yard. I remember looking out one day and saw a small group feeding in lavender plants in our front yard.

As far as the notes I wanted to pass on - I have a copy of a 1986 publication "The Status of Historically Rare or Unrecorded Birds in Idaho" by Daniel Taylor and Charles Trost. The description of the Lesser Goldfinch is as follows: "This goldfinch is causal in Oregon, Wyoming, and British Columbia. It has been reported without detail to occur at Minidoka NWR as a rare spring and fall visitor. One was at the Portneuf Gap near Pocatello on 21 May 1976. Four were at Caldwell, Canyon Co. on 12-15 April 1980 and a pair (same birds?) were at nearby Nampa a month later. One was in Shoshone Basin, Lincoln Co. on 19 May 1982. They have been observed in Twin Falls Co. at T. 12S, R. 17E, Sec. 21 on 16 June 1979 and at Mullen Creek on 24 August 1979." So, 35 years ago, more or less, Lesser Goldfinches were so uncommon in Idaho that individual records were still being recognized. And, today, as I type this one is in the tree outside my window and more are coming into my thistle feeders than the sum total of the records mentioned in the 1986 publication. Pretty interesting.

Scott Tuthill


Larry Arnold
 


DATA !!! 

Thank you Scott   =)



From: "Scott Tuthill" <satuthill@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 8:05:20 AM
Subject: [IBLE] Lesser Goldfinches -- Again

I meant to add some thoughts to the messages a week ago, but I had to find the document with the notes I wanted to pass on. First, I would say that Lesser Goldfinches have, over the last 20 years, undergone the largest range and population expansion of any bird in, at least, the Boise/Treasure Valley area. It also has a very special place on my life list as, I believe, the only bird where I saw my "lifer" in my yard. I remember looking out one day and saw a small group feeding in lavender plants in our front yard.

As far as the notes I wanted to pass on - I have a copy of a 1986 publication "The Status of Historically Rare or Unrecorded Birds in Idaho" by Daniel Taylor and Charles Trost. The description of the Lesser Goldfinch is as follows: "This goldfinch is causal in Oregon, Wyoming, and British Columbia. It has been reported without detail to occur at Minidoka NWR as a rare spring and fall visitor. One was at the Portneuf Gap near Pocatello on 21 May 1976. Four were at Caldwell, Canyon Co. on 12-15 April 1980 and a pair (same birds?) were at nearby Nampa a month later. One was in Shoshone Basin, Lincoln Co. on 19 May 1982. They have been observed in Twin Falls Co. at T. 12S, R. 17E, Sec. 21 on 16 June 1979 and at Mullen Creek on 24 August 1979." So, 35 years ago, more or less, Lesser Goldfinches were so uncommon in Idaho that individual records were still being recognized. And, today, as I type this one is in the tree outside my window and more are coming into my thistle feeders than the sum total of the records mentioned in the 1986 publication. Pretty interesting.

Scott Tuthill


Jay Carlisle
 

Thanks Scott

Fun to get all those details!  When I was first in town ~24 years ago, they were becoming a bit more common but now I better understand why RL was so excited about them 😁

Jay




On Saturday, August 8, 2020, 9:52 AM, Richard and Ann Rusnak <rarusnak62@...> wrote:

In Nampa yesterday I had 2-3 lesser GF, in my native wildflowers, this being a first non winter backyard observation.
Rich Rusnak


On Aug 8, 2020, at 8:05 AM, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:

I meant to add some thoughts to the messages a week ago, but I had to find the document with the notes I wanted to pass on. First, I would say that Lesser Goldfinches have, over the last 20 years, undergone the largest range and population expansion of any bird in, at least, the Boise/Treasure Valley area. It also has a very special place on my life list as, I believe, the only bird where I saw my "lifer" in my yard. I remember looking out one day and saw a small group feeding in lavender plants in our front yard.

As far as the notes I wanted to pass on - I have a copy of a 1986 publication "The Status of Historically Rare or Unrecorded Birds in Idaho" by Daniel Taylor and Charles Trost. The description of the Lesser Goldfinch is as follows: "This goldfinch is causal in Oregon, Wyoming, and British Columbia. It has been reported without detail to occur at Minidoka NWR as a rare spring and fall visitor. One was at the Portneuf Gap near Pocatello on 21 May 1976. Four were at Caldwell, Canyon Co. on 12-15 April 1980 and a pair (same birds?) were at nearby Nampa a month later. One was in Shoshone Basin, Lincoln Co. on 19 May 1982. They have been observed in Twin Falls Co. at T. 12S, R. 17E, Sec. 21 on 16 June 1979 and at Mullen Creek on 24 August 1979." So, 35 years ago, more or less, Lesser Goldfinches were so uncommon in Idaho that individual records were still being recognized. And, today, as I type this one is in the tree outside my window and more are coming into my thistle feeders than the sum total of the records mentioned in the 1986 publication. Pretty interesting.

Scott Tuthill


Nancy Miller
 

We only saw one a few years ago and then a few last year and now we see them regularly as well as American Goldfinches at our feeder.

Nancy Miller

Viola ID

 

From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jay Carlisle via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 11:40 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Lesser Goldfinches -- Again

 

Thanks Scott

 

Fun to get all those details!  When I was first in town ~24 years ago, they were becoming a bit more common but now I better understand why RL was so excited about them 😁

 

Jay



On Saturday, August 8, 2020, 9:52 AM, Richard and Ann Rusnak <rarusnak62@...> wrote:

In Nampa yesterday I had 2-3 lesser GF, in my native wildflowers, this being a first non winter backyard observation.

Rich Rusnak



On Aug 8, 2020, at 8:05 AM, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:

I meant to add some thoughts to the messages a week ago, but I had to find the document with the notes I wanted to pass on. First, I would say that Lesser Goldfinches have, over the last 20 years, undergone the largest range and population expansion of any bird in, at least, the Boise/Treasure Valley area. It also has a very special place on my life list as, I believe, the only bird where I saw my "lifer" in my yard. I remember looking out one day and saw a small group feeding in lavender plants in our front yard.

As far as the notes I wanted to pass on - I have a copy of a 1986 publication "The Status of Historically Rare or Unrecorded Birds in Idaho" by Daniel Taylor and Charles Trost. The description of the Lesser Goldfinch is as follows: "This goldfinch is causal in Oregon, Wyoming, and British Columbia. It has been reported without detail to occur at Minidoka NWR as a rare spring and fall visitor. One was at the Portneuf Gap near Pocatello on 21 May 1976. Four were at Caldwell, Canyon Co. on 12-15 April 1980 and a pair (same birds?) were at nearby Nampa a month later. One was in Shoshone Basin, Lincoln Co. on 19 May 1982. They have been observed in Twin Falls Co. at T. 12S, R. 17E, Sec. 21 on 16 June 1979 and at Mullen Creek on 24 August 1979." So, 35 years ago, more or less, Lesser Goldfinches were so uncommon in Idaho that individual records were still being recognized. And, today, as I type this one is in the tree outside my window and more are coming into my thistle feeders than the sum total of the records mentioned in the 1986 publication. Pretty interesting.

Scott Tuthill


Jim Lyons
 

Scott -

I'll add my thanks for the thoughts and yes data on the historic expansion of the Lesser Goldfinch. Wonder how it compares to other species' expansions over the same time in our area - precious few of them, alas. Have thought this would make a great Osher class!

--
Jim Lyons
jflyons@...
208-340-0533


On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 8:05 AM Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:
I meant to add some thoughts to the messages a week ago, but I had to find the document with the notes I wanted to pass on. First, I would say that Lesser Goldfinches have, over the last 20 years, undergone the largest range and population expansion of any bird in, at least, the Boise/Treasure Valley area. It also has a very special place on my life list as, I believe, the only bird where I saw my "lifer" in my yard. I remember looking out one day and saw a small group feeding in lavender plants in our front yard.

As far as the notes I wanted to pass on - I have a copy of a 1986 publication "The Status of Historically Rare or Unrecorded Birds in Idaho" by Daniel Taylor and Charles Trost. The description of the Lesser Goldfinch is as follows: "This goldfinch is causal in Oregon, Wyoming, and British Columbia. It has been reported without detail to occur at Minidoka NWR as a rare spring and fall visitor. One was at the Portneuf Gap near Pocatello on 21 May 1976. Four were at Caldwell, Canyon Co. on 12-15 April 1980 and a pair (same birds?) were at nearby Nampa a month later. One was in Shoshone Basin, Lincoln Co. on 19 May 1982. They have been observed in Twin Falls Co. at T. 12S, R. 17E, Sec. 21 on 16 June 1979 and at Mullen Creek on 24 August 1979." So, 35 years ago, more or less, Lesser Goldfinches were so uncommon in Idaho that individual records were still being recognized. And, today, as I type this one is in the tree outside my window and more are coming into my thistle feeders than the sum total of the records mentioned in the 1986 publication. Pretty interesting.

Scott Tuthill


labchick61
 

I have been observing Lesser Goldfinches in my backyard year round for several years now. I have 3 thistle socks and they come every day. They have successfully reared many fledglings that come to the feeders and beg from their parents!


rattlesnake4873
 

Location? City?

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 2:19 PM labchick61 via groups.io <lorrainp=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been observing Lesser Goldfinches in my backyard year round for several years now. I have 3 thistle socks and they come every day. They have successfully reared many fledglings that come to the feeders and beg from their parents!








bike4birds
 

I'm in the North End of Boise and I have the same thing happening. Only here
they hang out in the top of our maple and beg from up there. Right now most
of them have gotten around to feeding on their own, but some still beg.
And my wife has Rudbeckia all over the yard, which is just now starting to
bloom. The LEGO's are already hanging out in the plants, and all winter they
feed on the seeds. What's amazing is when they land on a slender stem and it
barely bends.
Right now they also have to deal with a very aggressive male Black-chinned
that seems to think he owns the yard. Sitting out on the deck for dinner has
produced some really close fly-bys.
Tom McCabe, Boise

-----Original Message-----
From: IBLE@groups.io [mailto:IBLE@groups.io] On Behalf Of labchick61 via
groups.io
Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2020 2:20 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Lesser Goldfinches -- Again

I have been observing Lesser Goldfinches in my backyard year round for
several years now. I have 3 thistle socks and they come every day. They have
successfully reared many fledglings that come to the feeders and beg from
their parents!


Elizabeth Medes
 

Odd... they won't come directly into our backyard but hang around the perimeter.  They are thick along the canal banks behind us, and north of us on Shalerock Road.  I just hung a DIY thistle feeder thinking I might be able to entice them closer, and the garden is full of all different sorts of sunflowers so we shall see.  They do seem to love the lead plant and locusts along the canal.  I see them in small flocks at unpredictable times now, throughout the year, and they certainly brighten up those last cheerless days of winter.

Liz Medes
Emmett, the east side

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 8:26 PM bike4birds <tmccabe9@...> wrote:
I'm in the North End of Boise and I have the same thing happening. Only here
they hang out in the top of our maple and beg from up there. Right now most
of them have gotten around to feeding on their own, but some still beg.
And my wife has Rudbeckia all over the yard, which is just now starting to
bloom. The LEGO's are already hanging out in the plants, and all winter they
feed on the seeds. What's amazing is when they land on a slender stem and it
barely bends.
Right now they also have to deal with a very aggressive male Black-chinned
that seems to think he owns the yard. Sitting out on the deck for dinner has
produced some really close fly-bys.
Tom McCabe, Boise

-----Original Message-----
From: IBLE@groups.io [mailto:IBLE@groups.io] On Behalf Of labchick61 via
groups.io
Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2020 2:20 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Lesser Goldfinches -- Again

I have been observing Lesser Goldfinches in my backyard year round for
several years now. I have 3 thistle socks and they come every day. They have
successfully reared many fledglings that come to the feeders and beg from
their parents!







labchick61
 

Sorry! I meant to include southeast Boise not far from Bown Crossing.


labchick61
 

Southeast Boise close to Bown Crossing.