Date   
Re: New Yard Bird!! #78

Janet Phillips
 

I was happy to see your sighting of the Lewis’s Woodpeckers in Horseshoe Bend as I was at Avimor residential development on Highway #55 which is just south of HB 2 days ago and a Lewis’s Woodpecker flew over me.  He was higher than I usually see woodpeckers and I scrambled to get a photo that is blurred but I was sure it was a Lewis’s WP.  Their coloration is hard to mistake!!  I feel validated!!  Thanks

On May 6, 2020, at 2:11 PM, Jon Barnett <jrb4jc@...> wrote:

So amazing – just the other day, I was driving down Porter Creek Rd, thinking how I haven’t seen a Lewis’ Woodpecker for years, whereas they were regularly seen when we first moved up here 20 years ago….they are my favorite western woodpecker…
 
…fast forward to 30 minutes ago… I was working on my computer and suddenly 2 birds flew into my crabapple tree – couldn’t believe my eyes – 2 Lewis’ Woodpeckers!   First time ever in my yard, so I’m a very happy camper right now…
 
Best, Jonathan, Horseshoe Bend
 
(the wind was blowing pretty hard, so it was so difficult to get any good shot…)
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
<Lewis Woodpecker pair - May 2020.jpg>

New Yard Bird!! #78

Jon Barnett
 

So amazing – just the other day, I was driving down Porter Creek Rd, thinking how I haven’t seen a Lewis’ Woodpecker for years, whereas they were regularly seen when we first moved up here 20 years ago….they are my favorite western woodpecker…

 

…fast forward to 30 minutes ago… I was working on my computer and suddenly 2 birds flew into my crabapple tree – couldn’t believe my eyes – 2 Lewis’ Woodpeckers!   First time ever in my yard, so I’m a very happy camper right now…

 

Best, Jonathan, Horseshoe Bend

 

(the wind was blowing pretty hard, so it was so difficult to get any good shot…)

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

Re: Leucistic Red-Winged Blackbird

climb_on2002
 

We saw a Leucistic Red-tailed Hawk East of Iona this past winter in January. It took a few minutes to figure out what it was! It was almost all white facing us but eventually flew down and up landing with its back to us! Then we saw the red tail. 

MaDWhitham
Suivez vos rêves aujourd’hui!! Demain n’arrivera peut-être jamais

On May 6, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:


That is something.  We saw a leucistic junco last fall in Valley County.  I couldn't believe my eyes.  Kind of dystopian.  

Liz Medes
Gem County

--
MaDWhitham
Follow your dreams today, tomorrow’s not a guarantee 

Re: Leucistic Red-Winged Blackbird

Elizabeth Medes
 

That is something.  We saw a leucistic junco last fall in Valley County.  I couldn't believe my eyes.  Kind of dystopian.  

Liz Medes
Gem County

Black-throated gray warbler

Elizabeth Medes
 

I heard an uncommon bird song late today. Grabbed my glasses and located a warbler way up in the nose bleed seats of our ancient front maple.  My list submission will most likely be challenged, but after comparing photographs of the distinct white eyebrow and under the eye, the blue gray back, and the song, I'm fairly certain this was a black-throated gray warbler. I spotted one in our side yard in October 2015.  Long time between visits.

I hope to be lucky enough to spot him again tomorrow.

Liz Medes
Gem County

Re: Leucistic Red-Winged Blackbird

Larry Arnold
 


Micah, regardless of IBLE community opinion and vote, that's an awesome looking bird   =)

Larry, W Boise



From: "Micah Austin via groups.io" <micahaustin@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 4, 2020 5:31:51 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Leucistic Red-Winged Blackbird

IBLE Community,

I believe the bird in the attached photos is a leucistic female red-winged blackbird. What do you all think?  Found this last Friday at Camas WMA in the east shelterbelt.  It did not sing and was generally not shy.  I was able to observe the bird for as long as I wanted, which was about 30 minutes. 

Curious to hear opinions.  Thanks everyone!

Micah Austin
Ammon, Idaho  

Leucistic Red-Winged Blackbird

Micah Austin
 

IBLE Community,

I believe the bird in the attached photos is a leucistic female red-winged blackbird. What do you all think?  Found this last Friday at Camas WMA in the east shelterbelt.  It did not sing and was generally not shy.  I was able to observe the bird for as long as I wanted, which was about 30 minutes. 

Curious to hear opinions.  Thanks everyone!

Micah Austin
Ammon, Idaho  

Gull

Robert Kiernan
 

Lower dam lake lowell 7:15 a.m. this gull? & clark- west. Grebes  5 red heads

Re: avocets swimming

Larry Arnold
 


From: "Larry Arnold" <larnold47@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 3, 2020 2:26:09 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] FOY Joy!


Awesome day, Tom, and thx for a vote of confidence, but I'd rely more on Jay because while I have a lot of experience, I don't necessarily remember it...  ;-)
Whereas Jay has excellent eyes, ears, memory and a lot of experience 

There's another factor we don't often discuss...  not long ago several of us had this game....  we'd each play a recorded bird on a specific CD set and challenge the others to name all the background songs, chirps, calls, wing sounds, whatever, and of course I always lost because those other birders were quite younger than I was, and they could separate most sounds from the "milieu" whereas I had lost much of that ability...

but...

Spring Migration Rocks !!!!
Larry



From: "Tom McCabe" <tmccabe9@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, April 27, 2020 4:51:17 PM
Subject: [IBLE] FOY Joy!

Since yesterday on the greenbelt was so crowded (social distancing notwithstanding), I was happy to jump out while it was still raining today because that always reduces greenbelt traffic. I was not disappointed.

My first FOY of the day was a Spotted Sandpiper at the main pond at Esther Simplot. I’m hoping he hangs around for a while.

Next was a Yellow Warbler singing from the trees by the river. Never saw him, but he brought me joy.

Then at the lower end of Veterans Pond there was a pair of Blue-winged Teal. This is not common for “my” stretch of the greenbelt at any time of the year.

At Les Bois track I was pleased to find multiple Western Kingbirds. They have nested around the south end of the track in prior years, so this is a good sign. Also at that end was a pair of Bank Swallows, but the overflow pond that used to attract them is now grassy, so I doubt they will linger.

But the real treat was a flock of 10 American Avocets that flew in tight formation  into Quinn’s Pond while Susan was watching. I came along a few minutes later, and they were out in the middle swimming. I had a vague recollection that they, like Phalaropes, swim, but I wasn’t sure. So both Larry Arnold and Jay Carlisle, my go-to experts on such things, confirmed that AMAV’s are swimmers. And while I was watching the Avocets, I realized that a Western Grebe, another FOY, had joined the mixed flock of Buffleheads, Cinnamon Teal and Ruddy Ducks that were on the pond in the morning.

Everywhere I went today, not only did I find the first of year birds listed above, but I also found lots of ducks, swallows and other birds that helped me to tally 51 species in 13 miles. A great day!

Tom McCabe, Boise



Re: FOY Joy!

Larry Arnold
 


Awesome day, Tom, and thx for a vote of confidence, but I'd rely more on Jay because while I have a lot of experience, I don't necessarily remember it...  ;-)
Whereas Jay has excellent eyes, ears, memory and a lot of experience 

There's another factor we don't often discuss...  not long ago several of us had this game....  we'd each play a recorded bird on a specific CD set and challenge the others to name all the background songs, chirps, calls, wing sounds, whatever, and of course I always lost because those other birders were quite younger than I was, and they could separate most sounds from the "milieu" whereas I had lost much of that ability...

but...

Spring Migration Rocks !!!!
Larry



From: "Tom McCabe" <tmccabe9@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, April 27, 2020 4:51:17 PM
Subject: [IBLE] FOY Joy!

Since yesterday on the greenbelt was so crowded (social distancing notwithstanding), I was happy to jump out while it was still raining today because that always reduces greenbelt traffic. I was not disappointed.

My first FOY of the day was a Spotted Sandpiper at the main pond at Esther Simplot. I’m hoping he hangs around for a while.

Next was a Yellow Warbler singing from the trees by the river. Never saw him, but he brought me joy.

Then at the lower end of Veterans Pond there was a pair of Blue-winged Teal. This is not common for “my” stretch of the greenbelt at any time of the year.

At Les Bois track I was pleased to find multiple Western Kingbirds. They have nested around the south end of the track in prior years, so this is a good sign. Also at that end was a pair of Bank Swallows, but the overflow pond that used to attract them is now grassy, so I doubt they will linger.

But the real treat was a flock of 10 American Avocets that flew in tight formation  into Quinn’s Pond while Susan was watching. I came along a few minutes later, and they were out in the middle swimming. I had a vague recollection that they, like Phalaropes, swim, but I wasn’t sure. So both Larry Arnold and Jay Carlisle, my go-to experts on such things, confirmed that AMAV’s are swimmers. And while I was watching the Avocets, I realized that a Western Grebe, another FOY, had joined the mixed flock of Buffleheads, Cinnamon Teal and Ruddy Ducks that were on the pond in the morning.

Everywhere I went today, not only did I find the first of year birds listed above, but I also found lots of ducks, swallows and other birds that helped me to tally 51 species in 13 miles. A great day!

Tom McCabe, Boise


Re: FOY Western Tanager

Jon Barnett
 

Oh good!  A second one for Idaho, thx! (unless there is no earlier record of a CN, I don’t know).  Well, then a reason #3:  The Western Tanager is more colorful, lol  😊

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Kerry Fitzharris
Sent: Sunday, May 3, 2020 11:46 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] FOY Western Tanager

 

I love the idea of the Western Tanager for our state bird. What about the Clark’s Nutcracker, though,—also a bird discovered in Idaho by Clark?

 

 



On May 3, 2020, at 11:12 AM, Jon Barnett <jrb4jc@...> wrote:

 

My FOY Black-headed Grosbeak hasn’t made an appearance yet – maybe today?  But I was DELIGHTED to wake up to my FOY Western Tanager sitting outside my bedroom window.

Did I ever mention that I believe we should change the State bird for Idaho to the Western Tanager? – for 2 reasons:

 

  1. Idaho would have it’s own unique State bird – ie., no longer share a State bird with another State, and more importantly…
  2. The Western Tanager is the only bird I know of that is historically noted as DISCOVERED in Idaho – by Lewis & Clark in their expedition.

 

If I am incorrect, please correct me.  But if this group got behind a drive to change the State bird, could we make it happen?  I don’t know if that is possible, but I’m throwing it out there…  😊

 

Enjoy this beautiful Spring day!  Jonathan, HSB

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Saturday, May 2, 2020 6:25 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: [IBLE] FOY Black-headed Grosbeak

 

Just showed up on safflower platform feeder.  Now up in maple, chirping away.  The gang's all here.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side) 

 

<DC5A2379CFA34153B6931AA5F20B69E3.png>

 

 

Re: FOY Western Tanager

Kerry Fitzharris
 

I love the idea of the Western Tanager for our state bird. What about the Clark’s Nutcracker, though,—also a bird discovered in Idaho by Clark?



On May 3, 2020, at 11:12 AM, Jon Barnett <jrb4jc@...> wrote:

My FOY Black-headed Grosbeak hasn’t made an appearance yet – maybe today?  But I was DELIGHTED to wake up to my FOY Western Tanager sitting outside my bedroom window.
Did I ever mention that I believe we should change the State bird for Idaho to the Western Tanager? – for 2 reasons:
 
  1. Idaho would have it’s own unique State bird – ie., no longer share a State bird with another State, and more importantly…
  2. The Western Tanager is the only bird I know of that is historically noted as DISCOVERED in Idaho – by Lewis & Clark in their expedition.
 
If I am incorrect, please correct me.  But if this group got behind a drive to change the State bird, could we make it happen?  I don’t know if that is possible, but I’m throwing it out there…  😊
 
Enjoy this beautiful Spring day!  Jonathan, HSB
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Saturday, May 2, 2020 6:25 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: [IBLE] FOY Black-headed Grosbeak
 
Just showed up on safflower platform feeder.  Now up in maple, chirping away.  The gang's all here.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side) 

 
<DC5A2379CFA34153B6931AA5F20B69E3.png>

FOY Western Tanager

Jon Barnett
 

My FOY Black-headed Grosbeak hasn’t made an appearance yet – maybe today?  But I was DELIGHTED to wake up to my FOY Western Tanager sitting outside my bedroom window.

Did I ever mention that I believe we should change the State bird for Idaho to the Western Tanager? – for 2 reasons:

 

  1. Idaho would have it’s own unique State bird – ie., no longer share a State bird with another State, and more importantly…
  2. The Western Tanager is the only bird I know of that is historically noted as DISCOVERED in Idaho – by Lewis & Clark in their expedition.

 

If I am incorrect, please correct me.  But if this group got behind a drive to change the State bird, could we make it happen?  I don’t know if that is possible, but I’m throwing it out there…  😊

 

Enjoy this beautiful Spring day!  Jonathan, HSB

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Saturday, May 2, 2020 6:25 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: [IBLE] FOY Black-headed Grosbeak

 

Just showed up on safflower platform feeder.  Now up in maple, chirping away.  The gang's all here.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)

 

FOY Black-headed Grosbeak

Elizabeth Medes
 

Just showed up on safflower platform feeder.  Now up in maple, chirping away.  The gang's all here.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)

Re: May Day visitor

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

Some Valley Co. species of note: Plumbeous vireo, several calliope hummers, Wilson’s phalarope, orange crowned warbler.
Also of note no rufous seen yet at the cabin, nor yellow warblers, yet.
But the ticks are out with a vengeance on Lickcreek Rd mossy granite out-crops😕
Cheers All, Rich Rusnak


On May 2, 2020, at 4:37 PM, henderson.danette <danette444@...> wrote:

Hi Tom,
Keep your eye out for that female Anna's with the dot. She may also have a pink smudge on her chest - both are leftover marks from winter banding. Heidi and Heather would be interested to know if this lady is hanging around nearby.
Also - just had a little male Calliope stop at the feeder. Hope he comes your way.
:) D

On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 10:40 PM Danette H <danette444@...> wrote:
Hi Tom, 
Our first BCHU male today too!  And a female Anna's as well. She has a white dot on her head....I think likely from banding? 
Hope all is well with you and family.
D

On Fri, May 1, 2020, 2:31 PM bike4birds <tmccabe9@...> wrote:

I put out my hummingbird feeders 2-3 days ago and waited IMpatiently. Today, while getting ready for my daily ride, a Black-chinned showed up, drank briefly and (I’m pretty sure) winked at me. (Well, maybe I just wanted him to wink at me.)

Tom McCabe, Boise

Re: Snow access south of Twin Falls

jmeredit@...
 

where are you headed? Job somewhere south? I am still in Arizona. Distancing..........Good luck with Cassia. Judy

 


On 2020-05-02 10:28, steve Dougill wrote:

Does anyone know if there is road access to the magic mountain ski area south of Twin Falls right now?  I will be heading south that way soon and was thinking about trying for the crossbills.  Too much snow?  Thanks for your help,
Steve Dougill

Easter Idaho Lazuli

Bill Moore
 

Our first Lazuli just showed up. They really love the cheap bird seed with millet/milo. I keep it up all summer, while sunflower seeds disappear, on my initiative, for birds in a couple weeks.

I saw Brian’s post about BH Grosbeaks. My theory is Evenings molt to BH because I don’t see both. Maybe this year???

I saw a pair of Sapsuckers yesterday and house wrens are bubbling. Maybe they will nest in garage again.

The Pygmy Owl continues it’s real early morning calls. I thought it was a Saw Whet until I hit the Cornell song site and figured out the difference. Regardless a tiny owl that would be nearly impossible to find and see up in the tree margin.

Hoot Owl out

Bill Moore
Hoot Owl
Inkom

Re: May Day visitor

henderson.danette
 

Hi Tom,
Keep your eye out for that female Anna's with the dot. She may also have a pink smudge on her chest - both are leftover marks from winter banding. Heidi and Heather would be interested to know if this lady is hanging around nearby.
Also - just had a little male Calliope stop at the feeder. Hope he comes your way.
:) D

On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 10:40 PM Danette H <danette444@...> wrote:
Hi Tom, 
Our first BCHU male today too!  And a female Anna's as well. She has a white dot on her head....I think likely from banding? 
Hope all is well with you and family.
D

On Fri, May 1, 2020, 2:31 PM bike4birds <tmccabe9@...> wrote:

I put out my hummingbird feeders 2-3 days ago and waited IMpatiently. Today, while getting ready for my daily ride, a Black-chinned showed up, drank briefly and (I’m pretty sure) winked at me. (Well, maybe I just wanted him to wink at me.)

Tom McCabe, Boise

Evening Grosbeaks Continue

lcarrigan_55
 

Like per previous post by Dave Pace, inundated with Evening Grosbeaks. Today, have counted 20+ individuals & 7 at feeders, at once. Cassin's Finches are running a close 2nd. And the American Goldfinches are in full breeding plumage & crowd the feeder in-between times, when the larger Finches make room. I've gone through 3 lbs of black-oil sunflower seeds today alone & will fill again before evening. 

Also, 2 of my favorite spring birds arrived today, both males, at the feeders. A Lazuli Bunting & Black-headed Grosbeak. A female Black-chinned Hummingbird is regularly hitting its feeder today. And, the Blue Jay continues to sneak black-oil sunflower seeds from the feeder. But, by far, the most vocal, semi-tame acting & frequent visitors, are the Evening Grosbeaks. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot 

Grosbeak Hoard In Idaho Falls

Dave & Brenda Pace
 

A pretty good hoard of Evening Grosbeaks have been devouring our black oil sunflower seeds the last few days.  There were 13 in the single feeder in the picture.  Such beautiful birds.

Dave Pace 
Idaho Falls, ID