Date   

so, everyone (like us) has one of these beasties terrorizing their feeders ?

Larry Arnold
 


https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/272817721?__hstc=60209138.b14a01ecbcc0ad97adda7baab951527d.1596206429000.1603885043563.1603894588247.110&__hssc=60209138.1.1603894588247&__hsfp=776849340

such drama....!!



Re: World Famous RL

Larry Arnold
 


way cool   =)


From: "kas dumroese" <kas.birder@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 8:14:42 AM
Subject: [IBLE] World Famous RL

Yesterday's issue of the Lewiston Tribune, front page no less, featured RL Rowland viewing the American Black Duck. 

Kas Dumroese
Moscow


World Famous RL

kas dumroese
 

Yesterday's issue of the Lewiston Tribune, front page no less, featured RL Rowland viewing the American Black Duck. 

Kas Dumroese
Moscow


Re: An interesting day for yard birds!

rattlesnake4873
 

I recall an afternoon on the John Muir trail in the early 70s or late 60s when we had all three western nuthatches and a brown creeper in the same tree simultaneously. That was a pretty cool rest stop on the way to Silver Pass. 

Dean Jones

“Bird is a verb.”

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 3:31 PM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Scott, what a remarkable "parade" through your yard, for *any* yard around here (Treasure Valley).....  including a WCSP sub-species “bullyae”   =)  
Your "where am I?" quiz would be a good one......

I thought of doing a similar thing when our Lawrence's Goldfinch / LAGO / showed up in Grand Junction CO, at the same time we had LEGO, AMGO, and PISI at our thistle feeders...... not sure why, but our LAGO attracted birders from the east coast, west coast, gulf coast, yada yada, for two months....  but I'll add that it was a very regular visitor to our thistle and was following a female LEGO around ("following flights") and doing some rapid billing (“mandibulation") with her, as in mating behaviors, resulting in thousands of photos being taken, and two stenos filled with observational notes by visiting birders.  As well as a paper published in the Colorado Field Ornithologists Quarterly.

Not sure if anyone remembers my wren quiz from a few years ago, when me and a birding buddy found all of the North American wrens in one day without driving very far.  The reason we did that was because one of our first birds of the day in our campground was a Sedge Wren, so off we went to find the others, but that involved *both* being in the right part of the country (S Texas) and the right season (winter-ish) and t’was before Pacific Wren was peeled off from Winter Wren. 

 

BTW, when I first got fascinated by hummingbirds, I went directly home from work every day for years and headed straight into our back yard in Albuquerque, where our hum-feeders were concentrated, and I took notes~notes~notes, filling a 2" binder each year with *just* hummingbird observations because I was well beyond any hope for help from a psychiatrist, hahaha

 

Thx again Scott for notes on your observations, because it unlocked some of my own deeply buried memories/experiences   =)

 

Larry,

West Boise Greenbelt 

 

Birds Rock !!!

 




From: "Scott Tuthill" <satuthill@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 7:50:20 PM
Subject: [IBLE] An interesting day for yard birds!

Nothing like the first cold snap of the year to stir up the bird life. It was a crazy and memorable day here at my place in the Boise Highlands area (Ada County). It’s worth a story so I thought I would share.

 

Right at first light the continuing ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD made it’s first of many visits today to my feeders today. I brought the feeders in overnight to keep them from freezing. Out they went a bit before dawn and the Anna’s was right there. Then looking down to the ground under my seed feeders I saw at least 10 Mourning Doves – likely a yard record. There were a similar number of Juncos, whose numbers have been building slowly over the past couple of weeks. White-crowned Sparrow number spiked back up this morning after declining from an initial peak a couple weeks ago. There was a dozen or so – 75% first winter birds. A couple of Song Sparrows were in the mix. Up on the thistle feeder were a couple Pine Siskins and a few Lesser Goldfinches. The sunflower feeder had its attendant House Finches and in the surrounding trees the resident Red-breasted Nuthatches and visiting Black-capped Chickadees where moving around. It was one happy family until a Cooper’s Hawk swooped in also looking for it’s morning meal. That scattered everyone. I had to wonder if the hawk was one of the family that nested across the street this year – which is another story to itself.

 

Later in the afternoon I looked back out in the yard to see most of the same had returned and were joined by some California Quail. It is fun too see them back in the yard after my usual flock being dispersed or consumed by the Cooper’s Hawk family. Over the past week I have noticed that one White-crowned Sparrow is particularly aggressive. Whenever it fly’s in it chases away whatever birds are where it wants to feed. It is definitely of the sub-species “bullyae”. It was in the feeding group today. And, at one point I watched it go over and grab the tail of one of the quail in its beak and shake away. I have never seen this before and just had to laugh. I had my camera with me but was not able to capture it on “film”. For its part, the quail seem surprised but after the sparrow let go, it just went on feeding with its friends.

 

This builds up to one of the best 15 minutes of birding in my yard, ever—and I have lived here 26 year. A little before 6PM I saw the ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD out feeding so I went outside with my camera to get some photos. As I looked down on the ground under the seed feeders there was a BLUE JAY. An all time new one for the yard. I have certainly been following the reports of them all over the state, but I was still shocked to see one in my yard. Unfortunately, I missed getting photos. As I looked around all of the birds from the morning were back, getting an evening meal before a cold night to come. I kept watch hoping the jay would come back but it didn’t. However, a Spotted Towhee came in. I have only a handful of prior yard records. As I kept watch I found the Anna’s perched in a maple tree just in front of me. I can’t wait to see how the photos turned out. A full frame Anna’s among the red and gold maple leaves. Just about then a flock of 20 American Robins flew by going one way and then a few Cedar Waxwings the other way. It was an amazing way to end the day.

 

I would love to create a quiz – “Where am I where I have an October 26 yard list with: Anna’s Hummingbird, Blue Jay, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Cedar Waxwings”. Or something like that.

 

 



Re: An interesting day for yard birds!

Larry Arnold
 


Scott, what a remarkable "parade" through your yard, for *any* yard around here (Treasure Valley).....  including a WCSP sub-species “bullyae”   =)  
Your "where am I?" quiz would be a good one......

I thought of doing a similar thing when our Lawrence's Goldfinch / LAGO / showed up in Grand Junction CO, at the same time we had LEGO, AMGO, and PISI at our thistle feeders...... not sure why, but our LAGO attracted birders from the east coast, west coast, gulf coast, yada yada, for two months....  but I'll add that it was a very regular visitor to our thistle and was following a female LEGO around ("following flights") and doing some rapid billing (“mandibulation") with her, as in mating behaviors, resulting in thousands of photos being taken, and two stenos filled with observational notes by visiting birders.  As well as a paper published in the Colorado Field Ornithologists Quarterly.

Not sure if anyone remembers my wren quiz from a few years ago, when me and a birding buddy found all of the North American wrens in one day without driving very far.  The reason we did that was because one of our first birds of the day in our campground was a Sedge Wren, so off we went to find the others, but that involved *both* being in the right part of the country (S Texas) and the right season (winter-ish) and t’was before Pacific Wren was peeled off from Winter Wren. 

 

BTW, when I first got fascinated by hummingbirds, I went directly home from work every day for years and headed straight into our back yard in Albuquerque, where our hum-feeders were concentrated, and I took notes~notes~notes, filling a 2" binder each year with *just* hummingbird observations because I was well beyond any hope for help from a psychiatrist, hahaha

 

Thx again Scott for notes on your observations, because it unlocked some of my own deeply buried memories/experiences   =)

 

Larry,

West Boise Greenbelt 

 

Birds Rock !!!

 




From: "Scott Tuthill" <satuthill@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 7:50:20 PM
Subject: [IBLE] An interesting day for yard birds!

Nothing like the first cold snap of the year to stir up the bird life. It was a crazy and memorable day here at my place in the Boise Highlands area (Ada County). It’s worth a story so I thought I would share.

 

Right at first light the continuing ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD made it’s first of many visits today to my feeders today. I brought the feeders in overnight to keep them from freezing. Out they went a bit before dawn and the Anna’s was right there. Then looking down to the ground under my seed feeders I saw at least 10 Mourning Doves – likely a yard record. There were a similar number of Juncos, whose numbers have been building slowly over the past couple of weeks. White-crowned Sparrow number spiked back up this morning after declining from an initial peak a couple weeks ago. There was a dozen or so – 75% first winter birds. A couple of Song Sparrows were in the mix. Up on the thistle feeder were a couple Pine Siskins and a few Lesser Goldfinches. The sunflower feeder had its attendant House Finches and in the surrounding trees the resident Red-breasted Nuthatches and visiting Black-capped Chickadees where moving around. It was one happy family until a Cooper’s Hawk swooped in also looking for it’s morning meal. That scattered everyone. I had to wonder if the hawk was one of the family that nested across the street this year – which is another story to itself.

 

Later in the afternoon I looked back out in the yard to see most of the same had returned and were joined by some California Quail. It is fun too see them back in the yard after my usual flock being dispersed or consumed by the Cooper’s Hawk family. Over the past week I have noticed that one White-crowned Sparrow is particularly aggressive. Whenever it fly’s in it chases away whatever birds are where it wants to feed. It is definitely of the sub-species “bullyae”. It was in the feeding group today. And, at one point I watched it go over and grab the tail of one of the quail in its beak and shake away. I have never seen this before and just had to laugh. I had my camera with me but was not able to capture it on “film”. For its part, the quail seem surprised but after the sparrow let go, it just went on feeding with its friends.

 

This builds up to one of the best 15 minutes of birding in my yard, ever—and I have lived here 26 year. A little before 6PM I saw the ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD out feeding so I went outside with my camera to get some photos. As I looked down on the ground under the seed feeders there was a BLUE JAY. An all time new one for the yard. I have certainly been following the reports of them all over the state, but I was still shocked to see one in my yard. Unfortunately, I missed getting photos. As I looked around all of the birds from the morning were back, getting an evening meal before a cold night to come. I kept watch hoping the jay would come back but it didn’t. However, a Spotted Towhee came in. I have only a handful of prior yard records. As I kept watch I found the Anna’s perched in a maple tree just in front of me. I can’t wait to see how the photos turned out. A full frame Anna’s among the red and gold maple leaves. Just about then a flock of 20 American Robins flew by going one way and then a few Cedar Waxwings the other way. It was an amazing way to end the day.

 

I would love to create a quiz – “Where am I where I have an October 26 yard list with: Anna’s Hummingbird, Blue Jay, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Cedar Waxwings”. Or something like that.

 

 



Re: An interesting day for yard birds!

Scott Tuthill
 

All the good birds come by your house first!

Scott


Re: An interesting day for yard birds!

Ceredig Roberts
 

Nice to have a Blue Jay visit. I also saw the Blue Jay at our house in the Boise Highlands on October 17th at about 8:15am.  Ceredig

On Oct 26, 2020, at 7:50 PM, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:

Nothing like the first cold snap of the year to stir up the bird life. It was a crazy and memorable day here at my place in the Boise Highlands area (Ada County). It’s worth a story so I thought I would share.

 

Right at first light the continuing ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD made it’s first of many visits today to my feeders today. I brought the feeders in overnight to keep them from freezing. Out they went a bit before dawn and the Anna’s was right there. Then looking down to the ground under my seed feeders I saw at least 10 Mourning Doves – likely a yard record. There were a similar number of Juncos, whose numbers have been building slowly over the past couple of weeks. White-crowned Sparrow number spiked back up this morning after declining from an initial peak a couple weeks ago. There was a dozen or so – 75% first winter birds. A couple of Song Sparrows were in the mix. Up on the thistle feeder were a couple Pine Siskins and a few Lesser Goldfinches. The sunflower feeder had its attendant House Finches and in the surrounding trees the resident Red-breasted Nuthatches and visiting Black-capped Chickadees where moving around. It was one happy family until a Cooper’s Hawk swooped in also looking for it’s morning meal. That scattered everyone. I had to wonder if the hawk was one of the family that nested across the street this year – which is another story to itself.

 

Later in the afternoon I looked back out in the yard to see most of the same had returned and were joined by some California Quail. It is fun too see them back in the yard after my usual flock being dispersed or consumed by the Cooper’s Hawk family. Over the past week I have noticed that one White-crowned Sparrow is particularly aggressive. Whenever it fly’s in it chases away whatever birds are where it wants to feed. It is definitely of the sub-species “bullyae”. It was in the feeding group today. And, at one point I watched it go over and grab the tail of one of the quail in its beak and shake away. I have never seen this before and just had to laugh. I had my camera with me but was not able to capture it on “film”. For its part, the quail seem surprised but after the sparrow let go, it just went on feeding with its friends.

 

This builds up to one of the best 15 minutes of birding in my yard, ever—and I have lived here 26 year. A little before 6PM I saw the ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD out feeding so I went outside with my camera to get some photos. As I looked down on the ground under the seed feeders there was a BLUE JAY. An all time new one for the yard. I have certainly been following the reports of them all over the state, but I was still shocked to see one in my yard. Unfortunately, I missed getting photos. As I looked around all of the birds from the morning were back, getting an evening meal before a cold night to come. I kept watch hoping the jay would come back but it didn’t. However, a Spotted Towhee came in. I have only a handful of prior yard records. As I kept watch I found the Anna’s perched in a maple tree just in front of me. I can’t wait to see how the photos turned out. A full frame Anna’s among the red and gold maple leaves. Just about then a flock of 20 American Robins flew by going one way and then a few Cedar Waxwings the other way. It was an amazing way to end the day.

 

I would love to create a quiz – “Where am I where I have an October 26 yard list with: Anna’s Hummingbird, Blue Jay, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Cedar Waxwings”. Or something like that.

 

 



An interesting day for yard birds!

Scott Tuthill
 

Nothing like the first cold snap of the year to stir up the bird life. It was a crazy and memorable day here at my place in the Boise Highlands area (Ada County). It’s worth a story so I thought I would share.

 

Right at first light the continuing ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD made it’s first of many visits today to my feeders today. I brought the feeders in overnight to keep them from freezing. Out they went a bit before dawn and the Anna’s was right there. Then looking down to the ground under my seed feeders I saw at least 10 Mourning Doves – likely a yard record. There were a similar number of Juncos, whose numbers have been building slowly over the past couple of weeks. White-crowned Sparrow number spiked back up this morning after declining from an initial peak a couple weeks ago. There was a dozen or so – 75% first winter birds. A couple of Song Sparrows were in the mix. Up on the thistle feeder were a couple Pine Siskins and a few Lesser Goldfinches. The sunflower feeder had its attendant House Finches and in the surrounding trees the resident Red-breasted Nuthatches and visiting Black-capped Chickadees where moving around. It was one happy family until a Cooper’s Hawk swooped in also looking for it’s morning meal. That scattered everyone. I had to wonder if the hawk was one of the family that nested across the street this year – which is another story to itself.

 

Later in the afternoon I looked back out in the yard to see most of the same had returned and were joined by some California Quail. It is fun too see them back in the yard after my usual flock being dispersed or consumed by the Cooper’s Hawk family. Over the past week I have noticed that one White-crowned Sparrow is particularly aggressive. Whenever it fly’s in it chases away whatever birds are where it wants to feed. It is definitely of the sub-species “bullyae”. It was in the feeding group today. And, at one point I watched it go over and grab the tail of one of the quail in its beak and shake away. I have never seen this before and just had to laugh. I had my camera with me but was not able to capture it on “film”. For its part, the quail seem surprised but after the sparrow let go, it just went on feeding with its friends.

 

This builds up to one of the best 15 minutes of birding in my yard, ever—and I have lived here 26 year. A little before 6PM I saw the ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD out feeding so I went outside with my camera to get some photos. As I looked down on the ground under the seed feeders there was a BLUE JAY. An all time new one for the yard. I have certainly been following the reports of them all over the state, but I was still shocked to see one in my yard. Unfortunately, I missed getting photos. As I looked around all of the birds from the morning were back, getting an evening meal before a cold night to come. I kept watch hoping the jay would come back but it didn’t. However, a Spotted Towhee came in. I have only a handful of prior yard records. As I kept watch I found the Anna’s perched in a maple tree just in front of me. I can’t wait to see how the photos turned out. A full frame Anna’s among the red and gold maple leaves. Just about then a flock of 20 American Robins flew by going one way and then a few Cedar Waxwings the other way. It was an amazing way to end the day.

 

I would love to create a quiz – “Where am I where I have an October 26 yard list with: Anna’s Hummingbird, Blue Jay, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Cedar Waxwings”. Or something like that.

 

 


Brown-headed cowbird

aking0601@...
 

I saw a brown-headed cowbird, adult male, on my way to walmart in Blackfoot today at about 11:00 am.  It had a distinct brown head, blackish body, and was built similar to a blackbird.  I got a pretty good look at him while I waited for the light to change...he was down on the grass near the gas station.  No photo, unfortunately.


Birds

Robert Kiernan
 

Murphy's neck adult Male hooded mergansers lower dam red breasted mergansers loon several horned grebe 1 eared grebes  w.grebe 2 small flocks ruddy ducks lions pond 1adult blk crown night Heron 1juvie 2am.widgeon 1 pie b.grebe wh.crown sparrow house finch 


Winter raptor surveys

Jeff Fleischer
 

Hi Everyone,

My name is Jeff Fleischer and I am project coordinator for the Winter Raptor Survey Project sponsored by the East Cascades Audubon Society chapter based in Bend, OR.  Our 17th season of survey work, 10th in Idaho, is about to begin and the reason for this message is to offer a chance to participate in this project if you have an interest.   Last winter we ended up with 392 active routes throughout OR, WA, ID, and extreme northern CA covering nearly 25,000 miles of transects each month and surveyed by a cadre of over 300 primary volunteers, it is an extensive citizen science project!  

Following is a list of routes in Idaho that are currently available for ownership, they average between 50-70 miles in length and designed to be completed in one day:

1.  Winchester                              
2.  Nezperce                                
3.  DeSmet - Tensed                    
4.  Churchill - Oakley                    
5.  Rupert North                           
6.  Rupert East - Minidoka.          
7.  Burley SW                                
8.  Burley SE                                 
9.  Paul
10.  Minidoka NW
11.  Heyburn
12.  American Falls SW
13.  American Falls - Rockland
14.  Arbon Valley
15.  Pocatello - Inkom
16.  Inkom - McCammon
17.  Virginia - Downey

We ask our project volunteers to commit to one survey per month during the primary months of December through February, additional opportunities are available in November and March, both optional months with usually a 50 % coverage.  You can select the day that you want to do your surveys based on your own life schedules.  Volunteers should have a good working knowledge of at least the more common raptor species in your area and of course be willing to learn more about this great family of birds :). You should have at least a pair of binoculars and if you have a spotting scope even better but not required.  You should also be comfortable with winter driving conditions, our project has a super driving track record.  

If this sounds like you would be interested in becoming a part of, please get back to me as soon as possible with your route choice, I will be filling them first come first served.  I will provide you with pertinent materials, including a survey protocol, to get you prepped for what you will be doing this winter on these surveys.  For a more detailed account of the project, I prepared a power point presentation that can be found on the ECAS website at:   ecaudubon.org   that will provide a comprehensive history of all aspects of this project.  It is a large program with 227 slides most of which have audio information tracks.  It is chock full of hundreds of wonderful photos of the 31 species of birds of prey that have been found on our surveys to date, check it out :)

Okay, hope to hear from you soon, this is a wonderful way of spending some time in the field during the winter months while helping gather extensive wintering data for these birds. I might add that all of our data is provided to The Peregrine Fund for inclusion in their large international data base of birds of prey in hopes of being used for research by various scholastic and governmental agencies. Thank you,

Jeff Fleischer
Project Coordinator
Winter Raptor Survey Project
East Cascades Audubon Society - Bend, OR

My email address:    raptorrunner97321@...


L.L. LOWER DAM

Robert Kiernan
 

5:30  water was calm below dam group of 13 ruddy ducks  small bunch red breasted mergansers 9 horned grebe  2 ear grebe another group of 6 ruddy 3 w. Grebe 1 Clark's have not seen the loon last 3 trips


Re: North Central Idaho Rarities

Larry Arnold
 


OVERDOSE !!!   

Geeze, Carl, I wouldn't be able to sleep after all this excitement,

like seriously !!!!

LA





From: "Carl Lundblad" <carl.lundblad@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>, "inland birders" <inland-nw-birders@...>
Sent: Sunday, October 25, 2020 4:44:03 PM
Subject: [IBLE] North Central Idaho Rarities

On Saturday October 24 and following Friday's early winter storm, I birded in Latah and Nez Perce Counties.  My first stop was at the UI Dairy Ponds in Moscow, where the most notable bird was a late PECTORAL SANDPIPER.  More exciting was a LONG-TAILED DUCK at the Genesee Sewage Lagoon (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75295461), a first for this well-birded location, with a Marsh Wren (uncommon here, mostly in fall).  Next, I easily refound a group of 6-8 BLUE JAYS, a long-time Nez Perce County nemesis for me, adjacent to Jewett Park in Lewiston (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75298697).  Mann Lake had about 100 TUNDRA SWANS, some Snow and Cackling Geese, Bonaparte's Gulls, at least 2 DUNLIN, and at least 2 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS.
In the late afternoon, I came across 2 LAPLAND LONGSPURS on Dry Creek Road, east of Troy in Latah County (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75361173).  Longspurs are very tough to locate in North Idaho, and this will be only the second eBird record for Latah County.  Kas Dumroese was later able to relocate them with 3 Snow Buntings!

Also yesterday afternoon, Ben Meredyk of Moscow discovered an AMERICAN BLACK DUCK at the West Levee Pond in Lewiston (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75359854).  Ben and Mason Maron relocated the Black Duck late this morning and had it in view when I arrived.  It even flapped its wings a few times, providing nice views of the uniquely violet-blue speculum without any white lining.  Thanks, Ben, for finding a great state bird (pending acceptance by the IBRC) and to both of those guys for making it easy on me.

Two PECTORAL SANDPIPERS were back at the UI Dairy Ponds in Moscow, this morning, and I relocated 5 GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCHES that Neil Paprocki found yesterday on Darby Road, northeast of town.

On Friday, I had a single SURF SCOTER, at the St Maries Sewage Ponds in Benewah County, and Kas and Neil both observed 3 White-wigned Scoters (the first record for Latah County) yesterday at a now-frozen pond near Potlatch.

Some really great storm-facilitated October birding in North Central Idaho!

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, Idaho


Re: Incredible ride today!

Larry Arnold
 



Extreme Thank You Mr. Tom, Missy and I found them all, your birds in caps, woohoo-hoo-hoo !!!    (our 1st bird this morning was GHOW)


YOU ROCK !!!





From: "Tom McCabe" <tmccabe9@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, October 25, 2020 3:09:07 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Incredible ride today!

After falling on an icy patch on the boardwalk through the marsh at Esther Simplot Park (ESP), my ride improved incredibly. After getting all the usual suspects along the way to Silver Lake, I was surprised by a RED-NECKED GREBE out in the lake. Further out was a WESTERN GREBE, but the RNGR was a first of year bird. (Maybe first in several years).

Then when I got back to Lander St., I took a little tour around the pond that is between Lander St. and the Greenbelt. This has been great for my first A. Wigeons of the season, along with Wood Ducks and an occasional Gadwall. But today, as I cruised the length of the pond on the concrete path, I discovered a EURASIAN WIGEON, a bird I haven’t seen in years. He was in with a flock of AMWI’s, but he was red where they were green. Way cool.

Final fun bird was an immature SNOW GOOSE, at ESP, on the main pond nearest Quinn’s Pond. There’s a shallow area there with a yellow rope to keep the little kiddies safe, and the bird was in that vicinity.

Gee, I wonder what I’ll find tomorrow!

Tom McCabe, Boise



North Central Idaho Rarities

Carl Lundblad
 

On Saturday October 24 and following Friday's early winter storm, I birded in Latah and Nez Perce Counties.  My first stop was at the UI Dairy Ponds in Moscow, where the most notable bird was a late PECTORAL SANDPIPER.  More exciting was a LONG-TAILED DUCK at the Genesee Sewage Lagoon (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75295461), a first for this well-birded location, with a Marsh Wren (uncommon here, mostly in fall).  Next, I easily refound a group of 6-8 BLUE JAYS, a long-time Nez Perce County nemesis for me, adjacent to Jewett Park in Lewiston (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75298697).  Mann Lake had about 100 TUNDRA SWANS, some Snow and Cackling Geese, Bonaparte's Gulls, at least 2 DUNLIN, and at least 2 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS.

In the late afternoon, I came across 2 LAPLAND LONGSPURS on Dry Creek Road, east of Troy in Latah County (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75361173).  Longspurs are very tough to locate in North Idaho, and this will be only the second eBird record for Latah County.  Kas Dumroese was later able to relocate them with 3 Snow Buntings!

Also yesterday afternoon, Ben Meredyk of Moscow discovered an AMERICAN BLACK DUCK at the West Levee Pond in Lewiston (https://ebird.org/checklist/S75359854).  Ben and Mason Maron relocated the Black Duck late this morning and had it in view when I arrived.  It even flapped its wings a few times, providing nice views of the uniquely violet-blue speculum without any white lining.  Thanks, Ben, for finding a great state bird (pending acceptance by the IBRC) and to both of those guys for making it easy on me.

Two PECTORAL SANDPIPERS were back at the UI Dairy Ponds in Moscow, this morning, and I relocated 5 GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCHES that Neil Paprocki found yesterday on Darby Road, northeast of town.

On Friday, I had a single SURF SCOTER, at the St Maries Sewage Ponds in Benewah County, and Kas and Neil both observed 3 White-wigned Scoters (the first record for Latah County) yesterday at a now-frozen pond near Potlatch.

Some really great storm-facilitated October birding in North Central Idaho!

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, Idaho


Incredible ride today!

bike4birds
 

After falling on an icy patch on the boardwalk through the marsh at Esther Simplot Park (ESP), my ride improved incredibly. After getting all the usual suspects along the way to Silver Lake, I was surprised by a RED-NECKED GREBE out in the lake. Further out was a WESTERN GREBE, but the RNGR was a first of year bird. (Maybe first in several years).

Then when I got back to Lander St., I took a little tour around the pond that is between Lander St. and the Greenbelt. This has been great for my first A. Wigeons of the season, along with Wood Ducks and an occasional Gadwall. But today, as I cruised the length of the pond on the concrete path, I discovered a EURASIAN WIGEON, a bird I haven’t seen in years. He was in with a flock of AMWI’s, but he was red where they were green. Way cool.

Final fun bird was an immature SNOW GOOSE, at ESP, on the main pond nearest Quinn’s Pond. There’s a shallow area there with a yellow rope to keep the little kiddies safe, and the bird was in that vicinity.

Gee, I wonder what I’ll find tomorrow!

Tom McCabe, Boise


E Blue Jay Valley Co.

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

Folks, I had a very unexpected visitor today at my suet feeder. I was unable to photograph this individual, but will try again tomorrow. Also using the just installed suet today were, Stellers, Canada jays, hairy WP, magpies and some low flyby of Clark’s nutcrackers.
Good Luck, Rich, Cascade area


L.L. LOWER DAM

Robert Kiernan
 

8:15 am 1500+snow geese several cackles 8 horned grebes w.& Clark's 2 dunlins on steps 1 ruddy duck  lions pond 1 hooded merganser 


[eBird Alert] Ada County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

Larry Arnold
 

Not knowing whether many local birders receive these RBA's, thought I'd share this interesting bunch of reports... colder weather inbound and tides are shifting, eyiyi........

Larry


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "ebird-alert" <ebird-alert@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 9:50:03 PM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Ada County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

*** Species Summary:

- Ferruginous Hawk (1 report)
- Black-backed Woodpecker (1 report)
- Pinyon Jay (1 report)
- Snow Bunting (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Ada County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Ada County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36228
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis) (1)
- Reported Oct 16, 2020 10:00 by Evan Buck
- Intermountain Bird Observatory at Lucky Peak, Ada, Idaho
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6056275,-116.0600716&ll=43.6056275,-116.0600716
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75237903
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "light morph, photo"

Black-backed Woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) (1)
- Reported Oct 18, 2020 10:00 by Evan Buck
- Intermountain Bird Observatory at Lucky Peak, Ada, Idaho
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6056275,-116.0600716&ll=43.6056275,-116.0600716
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75238188
- Comments: "clearly heard call note; has been at the site sporadically throughout the fall"

Pinyon Jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) (1)
- Reported Oct 16, 2020 10:00 by Evan Buck
- Intermountain Bird Observatory at Lucky Peak, Ada, Idaho
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6056275,-116.0600716&ll=43.6056275,-116.0600716
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75237903
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Nutcracker-sized and shaped bird with a light blue body/head and darker remiges. Head and face relatively uniform light blue, belly also clean blue; tail short. Relatively long, straight bill similar to CLNU. Strong direct flight, moving south with the wind. Seen well by both observers and I am familiar with the species. Managed photos but unfortunately out of focus; they still show light blue color and overall shape. Only other blue medium-large birds are steller's jay, blue jay, and scrub-jays. Each species has longer tail and does not have an overall blue color - Steller's has a dark head, blue/scrub jays have light bellies and different facial markings."

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (1)
- Reported Oct 22, 2020 08:50 by Kyle Lima
- Intermountain Bird Observatory at Lucky Peak, Ada, Idaho
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6056275,-116.0600716&ll=43.6056275,-116.0600716
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75217770
- Comments: "Flyover ID by vocalizations only. Gave three series of a twitter call followed by a soft “tew.”"

***********

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Re: Anna's Hummingbird

cheryl huizinga
 

I’ve had Anna’s in the past through the winter but they always came to the feeder so were Accustomed to that when flowers froze. My problem with these 2 this fall is they are not coming to feeder at all. I’ve used a heat lamp to keep feeder thawed in past and have it ready If/when those hummers figure out there is a feeder. Thanks for all the feedback. 

Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, Idaho

On Oct 22, 2020, at 12:59 PM, Kerry Fitzharris <birderfitz@...> wrote:

Cheryl, I put up a heated feeder for my Anna’s last year in December when I learned that someone else about a block away had put one up with success. Several came to it throughout the winter until mid-February when they vanished without a goodbye :-)

Kerry Fitzharris
Boise (north end)


On Oct 22, 2020, at 12:00 PM, rattlesnake4873 <Rattlesnake4873@...> wrote:

You can connect with Fred Erland in New Meadows. He had an Anna's all winter two years ago. Fred is on eBird and FB. Maybe IBLE, too.

Dean Jones
Donnelly and Boise



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet

-------- Original message --------
From: cheryl huizinga <bchuizinga@...> 
Date: 10/22/20 11:11 AM (GMT-07:00) 
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Anna's Hummingbird 

Thanks for ideas Larry. My plan Is to put feeder in Middle Of those plants and maybe they’ll get the message. I’ll let you know. 

Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, Idaho

On Oct 22, 2020, at 11:07 AM, cheryl huizinga <bchuizinga@...> wrote:



Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, Idaho

On Oct 22, 2020, at 10:59 AM, Terry <chipperxv@...> wrote:


Thought you would like to know that we have Anna's Hummingbirds in Reno, NV, and they are very keen on Pineapple Sage. Ours are fiercely territorial and will zoom down to hover right in your face if you get too close to their favorite plants.

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 5:26 PM Ceredig Roberts via groups.io <ceredigroberts=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Wonderful. Just had another visit of an Anna’s at our house in the Highlands this evening. Got some photos this time. Feeding on the Red Salvias And then checking out the feeders.  


On Oct 18, 2020, at 6:04 PM, Kerry Fitzharris <birderfitz@...> wrote:

I had a female Anna's coming and going from my feeder for about two hours this morning here in the North End of Boise. Beautiful red-speckled patch on her throat. Lovely to watch her in this fall light!