Date   

Re: Bird ID help

rattlesnake4873
 

I hit send too soon. The female chipping sparrow would show more striping about her eyes.

Dean

On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 2:52 PM rattlesnake4873 via groups.io <Rattlesnake4873=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I believe this USA female Cassin’s finch.

On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 12:53 PM Linda Lamb <lamreeves58@...> wrote:
Yesterday we were birding the top of Schweitzer Mountain and came across this bird. I thought at first it was a Cassin's Finch but upon closer inspection of the photo today I am not so sure. It may be an immature Chipping Sparrow. Can anyone assist? Did not hear it call so no help there. Also sorry if this is duplicated, had trouble sending. Thanks, Linda


Re: Bird ID help

rattlesnake4873
 

I believe this USA female Cassin’s finch.

On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 12:53 PM Linda Lamb <lamreeves58@...> wrote:
Yesterday we were birding the top of Schweitzer Mountain and came across this bird. I thought at first it was a Cassin's Finch but upon closer inspection of the photo today I am not so sure. It may be an immature Chipping Sparrow. Can anyone assist? Did not hear it call so no help there. Also sorry if this is duplicated, had trouble sending. Thanks, Linda


Bird ID help

Linda Lamb
 

Yesterday we were birding the top of Schweitzer Mountain and came across this bird. I thought at first it was a Cassin's Finch but upon closer inspection of the photo today I am not so sure. It may be an immature Chipping Sparrow. Can anyone assist? Did not hear it call so no help there. Also sorry if this is duplicated, had trouble sending. Thanks, Linda


Re: Not A Bird

Elizabeth Medes
 

Speaking of rarified air, Larry, we were up at the border of Gem and Valley counties, at 8k ft, Wilson's Peak, across from Snowbank Mtn.  Here's the checklist.

There was something else in Wilson's Meadow warbling that I couldn't quite nail down.  It was a strenuous hike out so I was concentrating on keeping up with the pulmonary demands, especially when the two turkey vultures showed up above us... didn't exactly inspire confidence.

I've noticed here at 2,700 ft some changes; rock wren are moving closer in to edges of town, as are horned larks.  I've seen more eastern kingbirds than before, but sadly, hardly any hummers came through.  Only have one set of black chinned.  And the yellow breasted chats have quieted down to just a few whistles.

Liz Medes 
Emmett

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020, 8:34 PM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:

hahaha Robert, kind of you to say "info" as opposed to another noun...  ;-)     In my "first life" I was a professional student....  MIT, ISU Pocatello, UC San Diego Medical School, ISU again, USAF, U Idaho, UNLasVegas...... 

but speaking of birds, they've stopped speaking hereabouts... so we need higher elevation than Treasure Valley ( we're at 2600ft on the Boise River Greenbelt )

Need higher ground, as in Seven Devils, Snow Bank, Warm Lake, Trinity, where else ??  
I ask this question annually because we keep hearing about new places to explore for high elevation birds  =) 

Larry




From: "Robert Kiernan" <photobirder@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 2:53:14 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Not A Bird

Thanks for the heads up sounds great larry what did you do in your first life you are .more then a bucket full of info

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020, 9:25 AM lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I know a lot of folks are interested in most natural phenomena, so here's another use for your binocs. Comet Neowise is putting on the most spectacular North America comet show since Hale-Bopp. This comet was only discovered on March 27 this year.

Right now, it's visible with the naked eye in early AM hrs about 8° above the NE horizon (fist on outstretched arm is 5°). My wife & I have been watching the past few mornings from our front pasture. This AM, went out at 4 & it was readily visible & the tail was amazing thru binocs. It will move higher in the sky & to the NW & arise earlier, so that toward end of July, will be visible soon after dark. 

It has a good chance to become a super comet (readily visible with unaided eye), last being Hale-Bopp (still have purchased-photo of H-B over Grand Teton in my office). And, I would say, it's quite close now. If you miss it, your next chance to view this comet will be in just another 6800 yrs. I decided I better check it out now! 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot



Re: Not A Bird

Larry Arnold
 


hahaha Robert, kind of you to say "info" as opposed to another noun...  ;-)     In my "first life" I was a professional student....  MIT, ISU Pocatello, UC San Diego Medical School, ISU again, USAF, U Idaho, UNLasVegas...... 

but speaking of birds, they've stopped speaking hereabouts... so we need higher elevation than Treasure Valley ( we're at 2600ft on the Boise River Greenbelt )

Need higher ground, as in Seven Devils, Snow Bank, Warm Lake, Trinity, where else ??  
I ask this question annually because we keep hearing about new places to explore for high elevation birds  =) 

Larry




From: "Robert Kiernan" <photobirder@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 2:53:14 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Not A Bird

Thanks for the heads up sounds great larry what did you do in your first life you are .more then a bucket full of info

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020, 9:25 AM lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I know a lot of folks are interested in most natural phenomena, so here's another use for your binocs. Comet Neowise is putting on the most spectacular North America comet show since Hale-Bopp. This comet was only discovered on March 27 this year.

Right now, it's visible with the naked eye in early AM hrs about 8° above the NE horizon (fist on outstretched arm is 5°). My wife & I have been watching the past few mornings from our front pasture. This AM, went out at 4 & it was readily visible & the tail was amazing thru binocs. It will move higher in the sky & to the NW & arise earlier, so that toward end of July, will be visible soon after dark. 

It has a good chance to become a super comet (readily visible with unaided eye), last being Hale-Bopp (still have purchased-photo of H-B over Grand Teton in my office). And, I would say, it's quite close now. If you miss it, your next chance to view this comet will be in just another 6800 yrs. I decided I better check it out now! 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot



Re: Not A Bird

Robert Kiernan
 

Thanks for the heads up sounds great larry what did you do in your first life you are .more then a bucket full of info


On Sat, Jul 11, 2020, 9:25 AM lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I know a lot of folks are interested in most natural phenomena, so here's another use for your binocs. Comet Neowise is putting on the most spectacular North America comet show since Hale-Bopp. This comet was only discovered on March 27 this year.

Right now, it's visible with the naked eye in early AM hrs about 8° above the NE horizon (fist on outstretched arm is 5°). My wife & I have been watching the past few mornings from our front pasture. This AM, went out at 4 & it was readily visible & the tail was amazing thru binocs. It will move higher in the sky & to the NW & arise earlier, so that toward end of July, will be visible soon after dark. 

It has a good chance to become a super comet (readily visible with unaided eye), last being Hale-Bopp (still have purchased-photo of H-B over Grand Teton in my office). And, I would say, it's quite close now. If you miss it, your next chance to view this comet will be in just another 6800 yrs. I decided I better check it out now! 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: not a Bird, not a Plane, not Superman.....

Larry Arnold
 


awesome reminder thx Brian...!!!  we'll be looking for it with eyeballs, bins, scopes, and listening for owls  =)
thanks too for directions.....

I've been reading about Halley's 1910 appearance when Earth actually passed thru its tail, the comet was readily visible to the unaided eye, and my reason for reading this stuff was because my other Big Hobby is family history / genealogy / and I've been reading thru my grandparents' 107 letters during 1908 - 1923, and on 19 May 1910 all life on Earth would be terminated by the comet's tail, whereas my grandmother wrote on 26 May 1910 "well I see that we are all still here!"    hahaha

this from wiki.....

The 1910 approach [of Halley's], which came into naked-eye view around 10 April[63] and came to perihelion on 20 April,[63] was notable for several reasons: it was the first approach [ of Halley ] for which photographs exist, and the first for which spectroscopic data were obtained.[16] Furthermore, the comet made a relatively close approach of 0.15 AU,[63] making it a spectacular sight. On 19 May, Earth actually passed through the tail of the comet.[95][96] One of the substances discovered in the tail by spectroscopic analysis was the toxic gas cyanogen,[97] which led astronomer Camille Flammarion to claim that, when Earth passed through the tail, the gas "would impregnate the atmosphere and possibly snuff out all life on the planet."[98] His pronouncement led to panicked buying of gas masks and quack "anti-comet pills" and "anti-comet umbrellas" by the public.[99] In reality, as other astronomers were quick to point out, the gas is so diffused that the world suffered no ill effects from the passage through the tail.[98]      

More of that history... this 1910 approach of the comet added to the unrest in China on the eve of the Xinhai Revolution that would end the last dynasty in 1911.


Just for fun,
Larry




From: "lcarrigan_55 via groups.io" <lcarrigan_55@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:25:35 AM
Subject: [IBLE] Not A Bird

I know a lot of folks are interested in most natural phenomena, so here's another use for your binocs. Comet Neowise is putting on the most spectacular North America comet show since Hale-Bopp. This comet was only discovered on March 27 this year.

Right now, it's visible with the naked eye in early AM hrs about 8° above the NE horizon (fist on outstretched arm is 5°). My wife & I have been watching the past few mornings from our front pasture. This AM, went out at 4 & it was readily visible & the tail was amazing thru binocs. It will move higher in the sky & to the NW & arise earlier, so that toward end of July, will be visible soon after dark. 

It has a good chance to become a super comet (readily visible with unaided eye), last being Hale-Bopp (still have purchased-photo of H-B over Grand Teton in my office). And, I would say, it's quite close now. If you miss it, your next chance to view this comet will be in just another 6800 yrs. I decided I better check it out now! 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Not A Bird

lcarrigan_55
 

I know a lot of folks are interested in most natural phenomena, so here's another use for your binocs. Comet Neowise is putting on the most spectacular North America comet show since Hale-Bopp. This comet was only discovered on March 27 this year.

Right now, it's visible with the naked eye in early AM hrs about 8° above the NE horizon (fist on outstretched arm is 5°). My wife & I have been watching the past few mornings from our front pasture. This AM, went out at 4 & it was readily visible & the tail was amazing thru binocs. It will move higher in the sky & to the NW & arise earlier, so that toward end of July, will be visible soon after dark. 

It has a good chance to become a super comet (readily visible with unaided eye), last being Hale-Bopp (still have purchased-photo of H-B over Grand Teton in my office). And, I would say, it's quite close now. If you miss it, your next chance to view this comet will be in just another 6800 yrs. I decided I better check it out now! 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: "fall migration"

Larry Arnold
 


Jay, thanks for your fascinating explanation of the timing of shorebird migration.   =)

 

When I got hopelessly obsessed with hummingbirds, I read everything about them I could get my hands on, and that’s when I discovered the BNA species accounts at UNM Albuquerque (with help from the science librarian  =)    For Rufous in particular, it seemed odd to be discussing “fall migration” when adult males began showing up at our humfeeders in both NM and CO during late June and early July, soon followed by adult females, and then........  a ton of stragglers, hatch-year (HY) Rufous that had no “guides” to show them when or where to go, i.e., neither direction nor distance.  This blew my mind, that they were “hard-wired” (as we called it) to migrate within weeks of hatching!!  We had enough hummers passing thru our yard in western CO that we noticed almost annually a few HY birds seemed to get “stuck” at our place, unable to put on enough body fat to leave for the next leg of their journey.  Now switching to Black-chinned hummers, because some of these remained into November, even December one year, almost making it onto our local CBC.  As a reminder, this had nothing to do with feeders being left up, as we had many salvia and agastache plants continuing to bloom into late fall…

 

I had hopes that the BNA (now BOW) diagram of the annual cycle for Rufous Hummingbird would survive cyberspace to share with IBLE, but apparently not.  Their migrations northward and southward defy our usual labels of spring and fall migration, because Rufous are screaming up the west coast as early as February, as is shown by eBird data.....

 

Hummers rule !!

Larry



Reference:  Healy, S. and W. A. Calder (2020). Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (A. F. Poole, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.rufhum.01

 





From: "Cliff and Lisa Weisse" <cliffandlisa@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 6:33:59 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

To your point, Jay, the curlews I follow for your study have all departed and are on or near their non- breeding  grounds. I recall that in the 70s while teaching at Council High, Adams County, I regularly saw yellowlegs the third and fourth weeks of August at a pond south of town.


On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 2:29 PM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I might add that, though it seems crazy relative to our traditional thinking about summer, most shorebirds are quite early migrants after breeding.  Most of this has to do with their molt strategy as all shorebirds migrate south before their complete molt. Thus, whereas many songbirds (robins, warblers, many sparrows) molt on or near the breeding grounds - and therefore linger for 3-6 weeks after nesting - adult shorebirds “pack their bags” remarkably quickly after nesting.  Reports in Idaho this year have shown multiple species of southbound shorebirds (e.g., godwits, yellowlegs, Western Sandpipers) since the last week of June and many of the Long-billed Curlews we study head S by the 2nd or 3rd week of June - 1 bird a few years ago even flew south in late May!!!

The early southbound migrants are all adults - and largely failed breeders followed by successful breeders.

Hope this helps explain this seemingly odd timing \uD83D\uDE01

Jay


It's also typical to start seeing migrant flocks of Wilson's Phalaropes in eastern Idaho by mid June.

Cliff

On 7/10/20 2:40 PM, rattlesnake4873 wrote:


Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Jon Barnett
 

Good stuff, Jay & all!


On Jul 10, 2020, at 6:34 PM, Cliff Weisse <cliffandlisa@...> wrote:



It's also typical to start seeing migrant flocks of Wilson's Phalaropes in eastern Idaho by mid June.

Cliff

On 7/10/20 2:40 PM, rattlesnake4873 wrote:
To your point, Jay, the curlews I follow for your study have all departed and are on or near their non- breeding  grounds. I recall that in the 70s while teaching at Council High, Adams County, I regularly saw yellowlegs the third and fourth weeks of August at a pond south of town.


On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 2:29 PM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I might add that, though it seems crazy relative to our traditional thinking about summer, most shorebirds are quite early migrants after breeding.  Most of this has to do with their molt strategy as all shorebirds migrate south before their complete molt. Thus, whereas many songbirds (robins, warblers, many sparrows) molt on or near the breeding grounds - and therefore linger for 3-6 weeks after nesting - adult shorebirds “pack their bags” remarkably quickly after nesting.  Reports in Idaho this year have shown multiple species of southbound shorebirds (e.g., godwits, yellowlegs, Western Sandpipers) since the last week of June and many of the Long-billed Curlews we study head S by the 2nd or 3rd week of June - 1 bird a few years ago even flew south in late May!!!

The early southbound migrants are all adults - and largely failed breeders followed by successful breeders.

Hope this helps explain this seemingly odd timing 😁

Jay




On Thursday, July 9, 2020, 10:15 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


vacation ???  


From: "Jonathan" <jrb4jc@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:35:16 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

Wow, they are already heading back?  They get less than 3 months of vacation, apparently…  Jonathan Barnett, Horseshoe Bend

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 6:35 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

 

Indeed, Denise.  This has been 115 days of  confinement while covering birding/fishing as much as possible in Gem Cty.  But what a reward waited for us this week in Valley.

 

Liz Medes

Emmett

 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020, 6:26 PM Denise Hughes <deniseh449@...> wrote:

Nice find!  I love large groups of unexpected birds. It becomes a WOW moment. 

Denise Hughes

Caldwell, Idaho



On Jul 9, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Still adding photos from a morning birding at Sugarloaf in Valley County.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S71298275

 But, the big surprise - which wouldn't have happened without a bored spouse benched from the ice rink due to Covid 19, an electric trolling motor, and a startling view of them lifting off 200 yards away, was 100+ Marbled Godwits, parked on the east side near HWY 55 among Canadian geese, pelicans, and other waterfowl.  What gorgeous critters.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)

 


-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Cliff Weisse
 

It's also typical to start seeing migrant flocks of Wilson's Phalaropes in eastern Idaho by mid June.

Cliff

On 7/10/20 2:40 PM, rattlesnake4873 wrote:
To your point, Jay, the curlews I follow for your study have all departed and are on or near their non- breeding  grounds. I recall that in the 70s while teaching at Council High, Adams County, I regularly saw yellowlegs the third and fourth weeks of August at a pond south of town.


On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 2:29 PM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I might add that, though it seems crazy relative to our traditional thinking about summer, most shorebirds are quite early migrants after breeding.  Most of this has to do with their molt strategy as all shorebirds migrate south before their complete molt. Thus, whereas many songbirds (robins, warblers, many sparrows) molt on or near the breeding grounds - and therefore linger for 3-6 weeks after nesting - adult shorebirds “pack their bags” remarkably quickly after nesting.  Reports in Idaho this year have shown multiple species of southbound shorebirds (e.g., godwits, yellowlegs, Western Sandpipers) since the last week of June and many of the Long-billed Curlews we study head S by the 2nd or 3rd week of June - 1 bird a few years ago even flew south in late May!!!

The early southbound migrants are all adults - and largely failed breeders followed by successful breeders.

Hope this helps explain this seemingly odd timing 😁

Jay




On Thursday, July 9, 2020, 10:15 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


vacation ???  


From: "Jonathan" <jrb4jc@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:35:16 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

Wow, they are already heading back?  They get less than 3 months of vacation, apparently…  Jonathan Barnett, Horseshoe Bend

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 6:35 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

 

Indeed, Denise.  This has been 115 days of  confinement while covering birding/fishing as much as possible in Gem Cty.  But what a reward waited for us this week in Valley.

 

Liz Medes

Emmett

 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020, 6:26 PM Denise Hughes <deniseh449@...> wrote:

Nice find!  I love large groups of unexpected birds. It becomes a WOW moment. 

Denise Hughes

Caldwell, Idaho



On Jul 9, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Still adding photos from a morning birding at Sugarloaf in Valley County.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S71298275

 But, the big surprise - which wouldn't have happened without a bored spouse benched from the ice rink due to Covid 19, an electric trolling motor, and a startling view of them lifting off 200 yards away, was 100+ Marbled Godwits, parked on the east side near HWY 55 among Canadian geese, pelicans, and other waterfowl.  What gorgeous critters.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)

 


-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


Rufous

Robert Kiernan
 

Reading brians mail about rufous hummers leaving.  silver city i saw plenty of them most juvies & females 2 males


Silver city

Robert Kiernan
 

Yesterday  i tried for several hrs to photo hummers at pats feeder you have to take several photos to get a few good ones as you can see it was very busy can you tell how many species are in the photo


Not Rare but Unusual Timing

lcarrigan_55
 

Had an usual appearance by a female Cassin's Finch at the black-oil sunflower seed feeder today. Primarily see in the spring, as Cassin's migrate through to higher elevations. Have never had a summer one along the Snake, before. 

Appears, after 2 wks of adult male & female Rufous Hummingbirds, they have since moved on. Now, seeing mostly female Black-chinned Hummingbirds. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

rattlesnake4873
 

To your point, Jay, the curlews I follow for your study have all departed and are on or near their non- breeding  grounds. I recall that in the 70s while teaching at Council High, Adams County, I regularly saw yellowlegs the third and fourth weeks of August at a pond south of town.


On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 2:29 PM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I might add that, though it seems crazy relative to our traditional thinking about summer, most shorebirds are quite early migrants after breeding.  Most of this has to do with their molt strategy as all shorebirds migrate south before their complete molt. Thus, whereas many songbirds (robins, warblers, many sparrows) molt on or near the breeding grounds - and therefore linger for 3-6 weeks after nesting - adult shorebirds “pack their bags” remarkably quickly after nesting.  Reports in Idaho this year have shown multiple species of southbound shorebirds (e.g., godwits, yellowlegs, Western Sandpipers) since the last week of June and many of the Long-billed Curlews we study head S by the 2nd or 3rd week of June - 1 bird a few years ago even flew south in late May!!!

The early southbound migrants are all adults - and largely failed breeders followed by successful breeders.

Hope this helps explain this seemingly odd timing 😁

Jay




On Thursday, July 9, 2020, 10:15 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


vacation ???  


From: "Jonathan" <jrb4jc@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:35:16 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

Wow, they are already heading back?  They get less than 3 months of vacation, apparently…  Jonathan Barnett, Horseshoe Bend

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 6:35 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

 

Indeed, Denise.  This has been 115 days of  confinement while covering birding/fishing as much as possible in Gem Cty.  But what a reward waited for us this week in Valley.

 

Liz Medes

Emmett

 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020, 6:26 PM Denise Hughes <deniseh449@...> wrote:

Nice find!  I love large groups of unexpected birds. It becomes a WOW moment. 

Denise Hughes

Caldwell, Idaho



On Jul 9, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Still adding photos from a morning birding at Sugarloaf in Valley County.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S71298275

 But, the big surprise - which wouldn't have happened without a bored spouse benched from the ice rink due to Covid 19, an electric trolling motor, and a startling view of them lifting off 200 yards away, was 100+ Marbled Godwits, parked on the east side near HWY 55 among Canadian geese, pelicans, and other waterfowl.  What gorgeous critters.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)

 



Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Jay Carlisle
 

I might add that, though it seems crazy relative to our traditional thinking about summer, most shorebirds are quite early migrants after breeding.  Most of this has to do with their molt strategy as all shorebirds migrate south before their complete molt. Thus, whereas many songbirds (robins, warblers, many sparrows) molt on or near the breeding grounds - and therefore linger for 3-6 weeks after nesting - adult shorebirds “pack their bags” remarkably quickly after nesting.  Reports in Idaho this year have shown multiple species of southbound shorebirds (e.g., godwits, yellowlegs, Western Sandpipers) since the last week of June and many of the Long-billed Curlews we study head S by the 2nd or 3rd week of June - 1 bird a few years ago even flew south in late May!!!

The early southbound migrants are all adults - and largely failed breeders followed by successful breeders.

Hope this helps explain this seemingly odd timing 😁

Jay




On Thursday, July 9, 2020, 10:15 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


vacation ???  


From: "Jonathan" <jrb4jc@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:35:16 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

Wow, they are already heading back?  They get less than 3 months of vacation, apparently…  Jonathan Barnett, Horseshoe Bend

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 6:35 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

 

Indeed, Denise.  This has been 115 days of  confinement while covering birding/fishing as much as possible in Gem Cty.  But what a reward waited for us this week in Valley.

 

Liz Medes

Emmett

 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020, 6:26 PM Denise Hughes <deniseh449@...> wrote:

Nice find!  I love large groups of unexpected birds. It becomes a WOW moment. 

Denise Hughes

Caldwell, Idaho



On Jul 9, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Still adding photos from a morning birding at Sugarloaf in Valley County.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S71298275

 But, the big surprise - which wouldn't have happened without a bored spouse benched from the ice rink due to Covid 19, an electric trolling motor, and a startling view of them lifting off 200 yards away, was 100+ Marbled Godwits, parked on the east side near HWY 55 among Canadian geese, pelicans, and other waterfowl.  What gorgeous critters.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)

 



Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Larry Arnold
 


ha yah !!!    Maui Wowie they call it, hahaha


From: "Chuck Trost" <trostchuck@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 12:44:29 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

Larry,
That must be pretty good weed you’ve got.  But I like the depth you want to explore.  Keep it up!
Chuck

Always forward, never straight...

On Jul 10, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Apologies for my "unkind" remarks yesterday.... 

“ hey Larry, lighten up, dude! ”   (  this ish me self-talk focus this morning   =)  (=   

 

Apparently, I'm irreversibly afflicted with HES…. "high expectations syndrome" that we, on a state listserv regarding birds, could have science-based discussions about topics like the fossil remains of birds and of their predecessors, of their subsequent evolution and radiation, phylogeny, classification, biogeography, origin of feathers and molt, origin(s) and evolution of flight, or loss of flight, aspects of physiology unique to birds, bill structure, feeding, nutrition, behaviors and communication, annual cycles and the role of photoperiod, migration or lack thereof, navigation, social behaviors, mating systems, reproduction and development, population dynamics, habitat associations, conservation, extinction, yes extinction….!!    allez allons-y, allons-y  !!!

 

Whew!  That was a mouthful, eh?

 

So, about every three years or so, I get frustrated over our lack of science-based discussion on IBLE regarding bird-related topics like those above, with THE Inferred Purpose of IBLE being to find, post, and chase the next year bird, next state bird, next county bird, the next “any list” bird, but especially the next Life Bird, regardless of how many resources we expend, e.g., petroleum.  I’ve been plenty guilty of this as well.  But hey, I’m thankful that IBLE isn’t as bad as it could be, because I know of state listservs that *forbid* posting about our yard birds (good grief), the focus being strictly listing, any and all kinds of listing…. 

 

Here’s my point, i.e., my lead-in to the notion of a “pair” of hummingbirds, which don’t really exist per se.  Most college textbooks on ornithology discuss “mating systems” and I’m lifting the following list of so called “pair bonds” (systems) and their “known” prevalence (definitions and examples are easy to find on google, wiki, etc.) from one such textbook (Ornithology, Frank Gill, 1994), but these occurrence rates have been changing as we learn more…

 

Polyandry        fewer than 1% of all bird species

Polygynandry  occurance ?

Polygyny         about 2%

Polygamy         about 3%

Promiscuity      about 6% of all bird species, including hummingbirds, manakins, grouse

Monogamy      predominant avian mating system, but I will note that I’ve seen recent peer-reviewed papers wherein this system is not as prevalent as we had always “thought” it was.  need data.  need input.  need more data and more input.  need analysis of data.  need reanalyses and peer reviews.  need science.

 

Totally free rant by Larry

No down payment necessary, easy payments of $0, no interest accruing !!   hahahaha

 

 





Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Charles Trost
 

Larry,
That must be pretty good weed you’ve got.  But I like the depth you want to explore.  Keep it up!
Chuck

Always forward, never straight...

On Jul 10, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Apologies for my "unkind" remarks yesterday.... 

“ hey Larry, lighten up, dude! ”   (  this ish me self-talk focus this morning   =)  (=   

 

Apparently, I'm irreversibly afflicted with HES…. "high expectations syndrome" that we, on a state listserv regarding birds, could have science-based discussions about topics like the fossil remains of birds and of their predecessors, of their subsequent evolution and radiation, phylogeny, classification, biogeography, origin of feathers and molt, origin(s) and evolution of flight, or loss of flight, aspects of physiology unique to birds, bill structure, feeding, nutrition, behaviors and communication, annual cycles and the role of photoperiod, migration or lack thereof, navigation, social behaviors, mating systems, reproduction and development, population dynamics, habitat associations, conservation, extinction, yes extinction….!!    allez allons-y, allons-y  !!!

 

Whew!  That was a mouthful, eh?

 

So, about every three years or so, I get frustrated over our lack of science-based discussion on IBLE regarding bird-related topics like those above, with THE Inferred Purpose of IBLE being to find, post, and chase the next year bird, next state bird, next county bird, the next “any list” bird, but especially the next Life Bird, regardless of how many resources we expend, e.g., petroleum.  I’ve been plenty guilty of this as well.  But hey, I’m thankful that IBLE isn’t as bad as it could be, because I know of state listservs that *forbid* posting about our yard birds (good grief), the focus being strictly listing, any and all kinds of listing…. 

 

Here’s my point, i.e., my lead-in to the notion of a “pair” of hummingbirds, which don’t really exist per se.  Most college textbooks on ornithology discuss “mating systems” and I’m lifting the following list of so called “pair bonds” (systems) and their “known” prevalence (definitions and examples are easy to find on google, wiki, etc.) from one such textbook (Ornithology, Frank Gill, 1994), but these occurrence rates have been changing as we learn more…

 

Polyandry        fewer than 1% of all bird species

Polygynandry  occurance ?

Polygyny         about 2%

Polygamy         about 3%

Promiscuity      about 6% of all bird species, including hummingbirds, manakins, grouse

Monogamy      predominant avian mating system, but I will note that I’ve seen recent peer-reviewed papers wherein this system is not as prevalent as we had always “thought” it was.  need data.  need input.  need more data and more input.  need analysis of data.  need reanalyses and peer reviews.  need science.

 

Totally free rant by Larry

No down payment necessary, easy payments of $0, no interest accruing !!   hahahaha

 

 




Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Larry Arnold
 


Apologies for my "unkind" remarks yesterday.... 

“ hey Larry, lighten up, dude! ”   (  this ish me self-talk focus this morning   =)  (=   

 

Apparently, I'm irreversibly afflicted with HES…. "high expectations syndrome" that we, on a state listserv regarding birds, could have science-based discussions about topics like the fossil remains of birds and of their predecessors, of their subsequent evolution and radiation, phylogeny, classification, biogeography, origin of feathers and molt, origin(s) and evolution of flight, or loss of flight, aspects of physiology unique to birds, bill structure, feeding, nutrition, behaviors and communication, annual cycles and the role of photoperiod, migration or lack thereof, navigation, social behaviors, mating systems, reproduction and development, population dynamics, habitat associations, conservation, extinction, yes extinction….!!    allez allons-y, allons-y  !!!

 

Whew!  That was a mouthful, eh?

 

So, about every three years or so, I get frustrated over our lack of science-based discussion on IBLE regarding bird-related topics like those above, with THE Inferred Purpose of IBLE being to find, post, and chase the next year bird, next state bird, next county bird, the next “any list” bird, but especially the next Life Bird, regardless of how many resources we expend, e.g., petroleum.  I’ve been plenty guilty of this as well.  But hey, I’m thankful that IBLE isn’t as bad as it could be, because I know of state listservs that *forbid* posting about our yard birds (good grief), the focus being strictly listing, any and all kinds of listing…. 

 

Here’s my point, i.e., my lead-in to the notion of a “pair” of hummingbirds, which don’t really exist per se.  Most college textbooks on ornithology discuss “mating systems” and I’m lifting the following list of so called “pair bonds” (systems) and their “known” prevalence (definitions and examples are easy to find on google, wiki, etc.) from one such textbook (Ornithology, Frank Gill, 1994), but these occurrence rates have been changing as we learn more…

 

Polyandry        fewer than 1% of all bird species

Polygynandry  occurance ?

Polygyny         about 2%

Polygamy         about 3%

Promiscuity      about 6% of all bird species, including hummingbirds, manakins, grouse

Monogamy      predominant avian mating system, but I will note that I’ve seen recent peer-reviewed papers wherein this system is not as prevalent as we had always “thought” it was.  need data.  need input.  need more data and more input.  need analysis of data.  need reanalyses and peer reviews.  need science.

 

Totally free rant by Larry

No down payment necessary, easy payments of $0, no interest accruing !!   hahahaha

 

 




Re: Thank Godwit (marbled)

Larry Arnold
 


vacation ???  


From: "Jonathan" <jrb4jc@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:35:16 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

Wow, they are already heading back?  They get less than 3 months of vacation, apparently…  Jonathan Barnett, Horseshoe Bend

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 6:35 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Thank Godwit (marbled)

 

Indeed, Denise.  This has been 115 days of  confinement while covering birding/fishing as much as possible in Gem Cty.  But what a reward waited for us this week in Valley.

 

Liz Medes

Emmett

 

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020, 6:26 PM Denise Hughes <deniseh449@...> wrote:

Nice find!  I love large groups of unexpected birds. It becomes a WOW moment. 

Denise Hughes

Caldwell, Idaho



On Jul 9, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Still adding photos from a morning birding at Sugarloaf in Valley County.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S71298275

 But, the big surprise - which wouldn't have happened without a bored spouse benched from the ice rink due to Covid 19, an electric trolling motor, and a startling view of them lifting off 200 yards away, was 100+ Marbled Godwits, parked on the east side near HWY 55 among Canadian geese, pelicans, and other waterfowl.  What gorgeous critters.

Liz Medes
Emmett (the east side)